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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for March, 1865 AD or search for March, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 57 results in 57 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Long, Eli 1837- (search)
Long, Eli 1837- Military officer; born in Woodford county, Ky., June 16, 1837; was educated at a military school in Frankfort, Ky.; and in 1856 was appointed a second lieutenant in the 1st United States Cavalry. He served in campaigns against the Indians, and in May, 1861, was made captain. He did good service throughout the Civil War, rising rapidly until he commanded a division; in March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general of volunteers; and in August, 1867, was retired with the rank of major-general, United States army, because of wounds received in action. General Long's most brilliant exploit was the capture by cavalry of Selma, Ala., April 2, 1865. Selma was defended by earthworks intended to resist infantry. Thirty pieces of artillery in position, with a gar rison of about 3,000 of General Forrest's cavalry, and 2,000 militia. The works were taken within a half-hour after the advance was sounded. Three hundred and twenty officers and men out of 1,250 engaged wer
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McDowell, Irvin 1818-1885 (search)
owell had command of the first army gathered at Washington, and commanded at the battle of Bull Run. After McClellan took command of the Army of the Potomac, McDowell led a division under him. In March, 1862, he took command of a corps, and was appointed major-general of volunteers. In April his corps was detached from the Army of the Potomac, and he was placed in command of the Department of the Rappahannock. He co-operated with the forces of Banks in the Shenandoah Valley, and was of great assistance to General Pope in the operations of the Army of Virginia. He was relieved, at his own request, Sept. 5, 1862, and subsequently commanded the Department of the Pacific. He received the brevet of majorgeneral United States army in March, 1865. In September, 1866, he was mustered out of the volunteer service, and afterwards commanded the Departments of the Irvin McDowell. East, the South, and the Pacific till his retirement, Oct. 15, 1882. He died in San Francisco, May 4, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Palmer, Innes Newton 1824- (search)
Palmer, Innes Newton 1824- Military officer; born in Buffalo, N. Y., March 30, 1824; graduated at West Point in 1846; served in the war against Mexico; and in August, 1861, was made major of cavalry. In September he was made brigadier-general of volunteers, having been engaged in the battle of Bull Run in July previous. He commanded a brigade in the Peninsular campaign in 1862; a division in North Carolina the first half of 1863; and from August of that year until April, 1864, he commanded the defences of the North Carolina coast. He was in command of the District of North Carolina until March, 1865, participating in Sherman's movements. In 1865 he was brevetted brigadier-general U. S. A.; in 1868 commissioned colonel of the 2d United States Cavalry; and in 1879 was retired.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Petersburg. (search)
tenant-general. The leaders in the Confederate government at Richmond contemplated the abandonment of Virginia and the concentration of the troops of Lee and Johnson south of the Roanoke. The politicians of Virginia would not allow such a movement, nor would Lee have led the Army of Northern Virginia out of that State; so President Davis and his advisers had to abandon their project. Besides, Grant held Lee so firmly that he had no free choice in the matter. It was near the close of March, 1865, before Grant was ready for a general movement against Lee. Early in December Warren had seized the Weldon road farther south than had yet been done. He destroyed it (Dec. 7) all the way to the Meherin River, meeting with little opposition. A few weeks later there was some sharp skirmishing between Confederate gunboats and National batteries near Dutch Gap Canal. A little later a movement was made on the extreme left of the Nationals to seize the Southside Railway and to develop the st
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pleasonton, Alfred 1824-1897 (search)
Pleasonton, Alfred 1824-1897 Military officer; born in Washington, D. C., June 7, 1824; graduated at West Point in 1844, entering the dragoons. He served in the war against Mexico, and afterwards in California, New Mexico, and Texas. For several years he was assistant adjutantgeneral and adjutant-general to General Harney, and in the fall of 1861 was acting colonel of the 2d Cavalry. He was made brigadier-general of volunteers in July, 1862, and took command of Stoneman's cavalry brigade, leading the van when McClellan crossed the Potomac, in October. Pleasonton was in the battles at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, and was afterwards efficient in driving Price out of Missouri, in 1864. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general United States army for meritorious services during the rebellion. He resigned his commission in 1868, and was placed on the retired list as colonel in 1888. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 17, 1897.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pope, John 1822-1892 (search)
the matter was dropped. Captain Pope was one of the officers who escorted Mr. Lincoln to Washington (February, 1861), and in May was made brigadier-general of volunteers and appointed to a command in Missouri, where he operated successfully until the capture of Island Number10, in 1862. In March, 1862, he became major-general of volunteers, and in April he took command of a division of Halleck's army. Late in June he was summoned to Washington to take command of the Army of Virginia, where, for fifteen days from Aug. 18, he fought the Confederate army under Lee continuously; but finally was compelled to take refuge behind the defences of Washington. At his own request, he was relieved of the command of the Army of Virginia and assigned to that of the Northwest. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general; in 1882 was promoted major-general; and in 1886 was retired. He died in Sandusky, O., Sept. 23, 1892. See Grant, Ulysses Simpson; Logan, John Alexander; Porter, Fitz-John.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rawlins, John Aaron 1831- (search)
Rawlins, John Aaron 1831- Military officer; born in East Galena, Ill., Feb. 13, 1831; was a farmer and charcoal-burner until 1854, but, studying law, was admitted to the bar at Galena in 1855. When Sumter fell he gave his zealous support to his government, going on the staff of General Grant in September, 1861, as assistant adjutant-general, with the rank of captain. He remained with General Grant throughout the war; was promoted brigadier-general in August, 1863; and majorgeneral in March, 1865. President Grant called Rawlins to his cabinet in the spring of 1869 as Secretary of War, which post he held until his death, in Washington, D. C., Sept. 9 following. After his death a popular subscription of $50,000 was made to his family, and a bronze statue was erected to his memory in Washington.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Salomon, Frederick (search)
Salomon, Frederick Military officer: born near Halberstadt, Prussia, April 7, 1826; became government surveyor and later lieutenant of artillery; emigrated to the United States and settled in Manitowoc, Wis., as a surveyor; was chief engineer of the Manitowoc and Wisconsin Railroad in 1857-59; served through the Civil War, entering the volunteer service as captain of the 5th Missouri Infantry and rising to the rank of brigadiergeneral, June 16, 1862; was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865; mustered out of the service Aug. 25 following, and for several years thereafter was surveyor-general of Utah.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schofield, John McAllister 1831- (search)
the Civil War broke out. He was chief of Lyon's staff at Wilson's Creek, and in November, 1861, was made brigadier-general of volunteers, commanding the Missouri militia. In April, 1862, he commanded the District of Missouri, and in October the Army of the Frontier, with which he drove the organized Confederate forces into Arkansas. In November, 1862, he was made major-general of volunteers. In the Atlanta campaign, in 1864, he was conspicuous; also in the campaign against Hood in Tennessee until the battle of Nashville, when he was transferred to North Carolina, taking possession of Wilmington, and was active until the surrender of Johnston. He was brevetted major-general, United States army, in March, 1865; was Secretary of War ad interim on the resignation of General Grant in 1868; resigned in 1869; and was assigned to the Department of Missouri. He was promoted lieutenant-general in February, 1895, and retired in September following. He published Forty-six years in the army.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Simpson, James Hervey 1813-1883 (search)
Simpson, James Hervey 1813-1883 Military officer; born in New Jersey, March 9, 1813; graduated at West Point in 1832, entering the artillery corps. He was aide to General Eustis in the Seminole War, and in 1838 became a lieutenant in the corps of topographical engineers. He was colonel of the 4th New Jersey Volunteers in the Pensacola campaign, and was afterwards chief engineer of the Department of Ohio. In March, 1865, he was brevetted brigadiergeneral, United States army. Having been on surveying expeditions in the West, he published a Journal of a military reconnoissance from Santa Fe to the Navajo country; A report on the Union Pacific Railroad and its branches; and Essay on Coronado's March in search of the seven cities of Cibola. He died in St. Paul, Minn., March 2, 1883.
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