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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Robert, -1871 (search)
Anderson, Robert, -1871 Defender of Fort Sumter in 1861; born near Louisville, Ky., June 14, 1805. He was a graduate of West Point Military Academy, and entered the artillery. He was instructor for a while at West Point. He served in the Black Hawk War q. v.), and in Florida. In May, 1838, he became assistant adjutant-general on the stair of General Scott, and accompanied that officer in his campaign in Mexico, where he was severely wounded in the battle of Molino Del Rey (q. v.) In 1857 he was commissioned major of artillery, and in October, 1860, Secretary Floyd removed Colonel Gardiner from the command of the defences of Charleston Harbor, because he attempted to increase his supply of ammunition. and Major Anderson was appointed to succeed him. He arrived there on the 20th, and was satisfied, by the tone of conversation and feeling in Charleston, and by the military drills going on, that a revolution was to be inaugurated there. He communicated his suspicions to Adjutant
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Angell, James Burrill, 1829- (search)
rrill, 1829- Educator and diplomatist; born in Scituate, R. I., Jan. 7, 1829; was graduated at Brown University; in 1849; Professor of Modern Languages and Literature at Brown University in 1853-60; president of the University of Vermont in 1866-71; and since 1871 president of the University of Michigan. In 1880-81 he was United States minister to China; in 1887 a member of the Anglo-American Commission on Canadian Fisheries: in 1896 chairman of the Canadian-American Commission on Deep Wateranguages and Literature at Brown University in 1853-60; president of the University of Vermont in 1866-71; and since 1871 president of the University of Michigan. In 1880-81 he was United States minister to China; in 1887 a member of the Anglo-American Commission on Canadian Fisheries: in 1896 chairman of the Canadian-American Commission on Deep Waterways from the Great Lakes to the Sea: and in 1897-98 United States minister to Turkey. He is author of numerous addresses, and magazine articles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas, (search)
d Yell1840 to 1844 Samuel Adams1844 Thomas S. Drew1844 to 1848 John S. Roane1848 to 1852 Elias N. Conway1852 to 1860 Henry M. Rector1860 to 1862 Harris Flanagin1862 to 1864 Isaac Murphy1864 to 1868 Powell Clayton1868 to 1871 Orzo H. Hadley1871 to 1872 Elisha Baxter1872 to 1874 Augustus H. Garland1874 to 1876 Wm. R. Miller1877 to 1881 Thos. J. Churchill1881 to 1883 Jas. H. Berry1883 to 1885 Simon P. Hughes1885 to 1889 James P. Eagle1889 to 1893 Wm. M. Fishback1893 to 1895 James 44 to 1848 Solon Borland30th to 33d1848 to 1853 Wm. K. Sebastian30th to 36th1848 to 1861 Robert W. Johnston33d to 36th1853 to 1861 37th, 38th, and 39th Congresses vacant. Alexander McDonald40th to 42d1868 to 1871 Benj. F. Rice40th to 43d1868 to 1873 Powell Clayton42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Stephen W. Dorsey44th to 46th1873 to 1879 Augustus H. Garland45th to 49th1877 to 1885 James D. Walker46th to 49th1879 to 1885 James K. Jones49th to----1885 to---- James H. Berry49th to----1885 to----
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Assiniboine Indians, (search)
Assiniboine Indians, A branch of the Dakota family, inhabiting each side of the boundary-line between the United States and British America in Montana and Manitoba. They were originally a part of the Yankton Sioux, but, after a bitter quarrel. they separated from the main body at the beginning of the seventeenth century, and the two bands have ever remained hostile. The French discovered them as early as 1640. In 1871 the number of Assiniboines in the United States was estimated at 4.850, and in 1900 there were 1.316, nearly equally divided at the Fort Peck and Fort Belknap agencies in Montana.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887 (search)
Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887 Scientist; born in Reading, Pa., Feb. 3, 1823; was graduated at Dickinson College in 1840. In 1850 he was appointed assistant secretary to the Smithsonian Institution. He held that office until the death of Prof. Joseph Henry (q. v.) in 1878, when he succeeded to the office of secretary, which he held until his death, on Aug. 19, 1887, Professor Baird published several works on natural history. In 1871 he was placed at the head of the United States Fish Commission. He died in Wood's Holl, Mass., Aug. 19, 1887.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Balloons in War. (search)
rtunity of demonstrating the availability of the science of aeronautics in the service of the country. After sending the above despatch, Mr. Lowe was invited to the Executive Mansion and introduced to General Scott: and he was soon afterwards employed in the military service. When in use. the balloon was kept under control by strong cords in the hands of men on the ground, who, when the reconnoissance was ended, drew it down to the place of departure. During the Franco-Prussian War (1870-71) balloons were freely used by both parties, Gambetta and other French authorities passed successfully over the investing lines of Germans; and captive or observation as well as floating balloons were frequent targets for ambitious sharp-shooters. In the Santiago campaign in Cuba, in 1898, much was expected of an observation balloon, put together and operated by men of the United States War balloon. Signal Service. Several successful ascensions were made, and messages describing the situati
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
Doctor of Civil Law. During this residence in Europe he perfected his collection of materials for his history, visiting the public archives and libraries at Paris. Returning to the United States in 1849, he made his residence in New York City, where he prosecuted his historical labors. He was engaged in this work until 1867, when he was appointed, by President Johnson (May 14), minister to Prussia, and accepted the office. In 1868 he was accredited to the North German Confederation, and in 1871 to the German Empire. In August, 1868, Mr. Bancroft received from the University of Bonn the honorary degree of Doctor Juris ; and in 1870 he celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the reception of his first degree at Gottingen. Mr. Bancroft was a contributor of numerous essays to the North American review. In 1889 he published Martin Van Buren to the end of his public career, which he had written many years before. His History of the United States has been translated into several languag
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barentz, Willem, 1594- (search)
Barentz, Willem, 1594- Navigator; born in Holland; commanded exploring expeditions to Nova Zembla and Spitzbergen in 1594-97. His first expedition was an attempt to find a passage through the Arctic Ocean to China, in which he reached lat. 78° N. On his third and last expedition, in 1596-97, he reached lat. 80° 11′ N., and discovered Spitzbergen. He died near Nova Zembla, June 20, 1597. Captain Carlsen, after a lapse of 274 years, found Barentz's winter quarters undisturbed in 1871; and some of the navigator's journals were recovered in 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barker, Jacob, -1871 (search)
Barker, Jacob, -1871 Financier; born on Swan Island, Kennebec co., Me., Dec. 7, 1779; was of a Quaker family, and related by blood to the mother of Dr. Franklin. He began trade in New York when quite Jacob Barker. young, and at twenty-one he owned four ships and a brig, and was largely engaged in commercial transactions. As a State Senator, and while sitting in the Court of Errors, he gave an opinion in an insurance case in opposition to Judge Kent, and was sustained by the court. During the War of 1812 his ships were all captured. Being in Washington, D. C., during its sack by the British (August, 1814), he assisted Mrs. Madison in saving Stuart's portrait of Washington, then hanging in the President's house, which was set on fire a few hours later. Barker was a banker, a dealer in stocks, and a general and shrewd financier for many years. He finally established himself in New Orleans in 1834, where he was admitted to the bar as a lawyer, and soon became a political and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Francis Channing, 1834-1896 (search)
96 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He died in New York City, Jan. 11, 1896.
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