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state of defense. Gen. Robert E. Lee having been appointed by Governor Letcher to command all Virginia forces until the State should be formally incorporated in the Confederate States, directed Maj. A. Loring, commanding volunteers at Wheeling on April 29, 1861, to accept and muster into service such volunteer companies as might offer themselves in compliance with the call of Governor Letcher, and to take command of them. His command was confined to the counties of Wetzel, Marshall, Ohio, Brooke and Hancock, with special duty to protect the terminus of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. At the same time Maj. F. M. Boykin, Jr., at Weston, was directed by General Lee to muster volunteer companies into the service of the State, and posting his command at or near Grafton, to co-operate with Major Loring in holding both branches of the railroad for the benefit of Maryland and Virginia. These officers were directed to give quiet and security to the inhabitants of the country, and also to fa
, only to be repulsed, with the loss of 1,000 men; although Grant claims to have captured six pieces of artillery, several hundred prisoners, and to have detained troops that were under marching orders to Early. Gen. F. A. Walker writes of this movement: It should be frankly confessed that the troops on our side engaged, behaved with little spirit. . . . When it is added that the two brigades most in fault were the Irish brigade and that which had been so long and so gloriously commanded by Brooke, it will appear to what a condition the army had been reduced by three months of desperate fighting. Having drawn a portion of Lee's army north of the James, Grant, on the 18th, sent Warren, with the Fifth corps, to his left, to capture the Weldon railroad and attack Lee's right. Following the plank road southward to the Globe tavern, on the railroad south of Petersburg, Warren then turned northward, along the railway, toward Petersburg, until Heth's division of Hill's corps struck his e
uation, he began his services in the field in the Florida war of 1841-42. He subsequently served in garrison at Jefferson barracks, Mo., and on frontier duty at Fort Towson, Indian Territory, and Fort Smith, Ark., and as aide-de-camp to Brigadier-General Brooke at New Orleans. He was promoted first lieutenant in February, 1847, and continued in service, at San Antonio, Tex., and at Fort Pierre, Dak., where he was promoted captain. He assisted in quelling the Kansas disturbances in 1856-57,wasdon Maury Major-General Dabney Herndon Maury was born at Fredericksburg, Va., May 20, 1822, the son of Capt. John Minor Maury, United States navy, whose wife was the daughter of Fontaine Maury. His descent is from the old Virginia families of Brooke and Minor, and the Huguenot emigres, the Fontaines and Maurys. He was educated at the classical school of Thomas Harrison, Fredericksburg, studied law at the university of Virginia, and was graduated at West Point in 1846, with the rank of breve
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
. He was married, November 20, 1870, to Miss Loulie Law, of Hartsville, S. C. They have had eleven children: Margaret Ervin, now Mrs. Dr. Beckham, of Hartsville; Marion Edmonds, Thomas Law, Elihu Witherspoon, Harry Lee, Emma Cornelia (deceased), Brooke G., Marie Hart, James Ervin, Ruth Kirkpatrick and Louie (deceased). Marion E., the oldest son, is farming in Darlington county. Lieutenant Cannon is past commander and first lieutenant commander of Darlington camp, No. 785, U. C. V., at Darlingtohe took charge of the boat with a crew and brought her up under the guns of Fort Johnson. During the attack of the Federal monitors upon Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863, he was in command of a section of the east-face battery, in which was the famous Brooke gun. After a two hours engagement the fleet was compelled to retire with the loss of the Keokuk. On the morning of August 17th, when the seven days bombardment of Sumter was begun, he was officer of the guard, and when the destructive fire of th
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
s built an ironclad casemate, like that of the original Virginia. The sides of this casemate were 15 inches of pine, 3 inches of oak and 4 inches of iron. At the bow was attached a ram and a spar to carry a torpedo. Her armament was two 7-inch Brooke guns on bow and stern pivots, and two 6-inch Brooke rifles in broadside, and the larger guns were so arranged that both the 7-inch and one of the 6-inch guns could be worked on either broadside. The Georgia was of a different construction, 250 fBrooke rifles in broadside, and the larger guns were so arranged that both the 7-inch and one of the 6-inch guns could be worked on either broadside. The Georgia was of a different construction, 250 feet long and 60 feet in beam, with a casemate 12 feet high. Her machinery was defective, and it was necessary to tow her where needed. She carried seven guns and was under the command of Lieut. J. Pembroke Jones. The Atlanta, under command of Lieut. Charles H. McBlair, made a trial trip toward Fort Pulaski on July 31st and created much consternation in the Federal fleet. A Northern newspaper correspondent wrote that unless some monitor should come to the rescue, the fair-weather yachts now
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: raid of the Confederate ironclads off Charles-Ton.—attack on Fort M'Allister. (search)
s report that they were not struck by a projectile during the raid. The construction of such vessels at Charleston must have been imperfect from a lack of plant of suitable materials, and of skilled workmen. Since writing the above, one of their former lieutenants, whose opinion and statements may be relied on, states: They were well-constructed vessels, covered with four inches of iron, and would steam about seven knots. They drew twelve to thirteen feet, and were each armed with two Brooke rifled 80 pounders, and two 64-pounder shell-guns. He has no recollection as to where the enginery was made. From the experience in the capture of the Atlanta, it may be regarded certain that their casemates would not have resisted Xv-inch shells. The wonder is, that under so man disadvantages, they should have ventured to construct any vessels. In every case the labor was without compensating result, if we except the structure on the hull of the frigate Merrimac, known as the Virginia to
than 1,100 yards to outer batteries, save the Keokuk, which drifted to within 900 yards of Sumter. Engineer Echols reports nearest approach of monitors, 900 yards ; of Ironsides to Moultrie, 1,700 yards, and to Sumter, 2,000 yards. Iii—return of guns and mortars at forts and batteries in Charleston Harbor engaged with the ironclads, April 1, 1863, together with return of ammunition expended, and statement of casualties. Fort or Battery.X-in. Columbiad.Ix-in. Dahlgren.Vii-in. Brooke rifle.Viii-in. Columbiad.42-pounder, rifled.32-pounder, rifled.32-pdr., smooth.X-in. mortars.Grand total. Fort Johnson11 Fort Sumter42287113744 Fort Moultrie955221 Battery Bee516 Battery Beauregard112 Battery Cumming's Point112 Battery Wagner11 ————————— Total10321978181077 ————————— Ammunition—Shot3858086731140321343 Shell54593 Total shot and shell2,229 Total pounds of powder21,093 Casualties in action3 killed, 11 wounded. Number of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
f Colonel Rains as general superintendent, while an officer of less rank took immediate charge. Subsequently it was agreed by the War Department that the Navy should take sole charge and use the works for its own purposes. It was here that Commander Brooke made many of his formidable banded and rifled guns. The foundry and rolling-mills then grew into large proportions, supplied by the iron and coal of that region. Had the Confederacy survived, Selma bid fair to become the Pittsburgh of tht of the introduction of the charge into the air space may have been omitted in the narrative to him, and thus he may have been drawn into this helpless conclusion. I never saw the drawings of the gun until after the report of the accident. Captain Brooke, Chief of Ordnance of the Navy, with me then looked over the drawings and evolved the design of the air-chamber. After this the gun was fired, and with moderate elevations attained fair, but not remarkable ranges, as I was advised. The crac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Development of the arsenals, armories and other places of manufacture of Ordnance stores. (search)
erate finances. He made it a condition that he should be relieved of his works and contract at Selma without pecuniary loss to himself. The works were thereupon assumed by the War and Navy Departments jointly, and placed at first under the charge of Colonel Rains as general superintendent, while an officer of less rank took immediate charge. Subsequently it was agreed by the War Department that the Navy should take sole charge and use the works for its own purposes. It was here that Commander Brooke made many of his formidable banded and rifled guns. The foundry and rolling-mills then grew into large proportions, supplied by the iron and coal of that region. Had the Confederacy survived, Selma bid fair to become the Pittsburgh of the South. The iron obtained from the brown haematite at the furnaces in Bibb county (Brierfield), and from the Shelby Works, was admirable, the former being of unusual strength. Mount Vernon Arsenal was still continued, after being in a great meas
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Detached observations. (search)
On a report of the facts direct from Charleston to Captain Blakeley, he attributed the bursting to the high elevation given, though the highest, I think had been only about 150; an impotent conclusion for a scientific artillerist to reach. The fact of the introduction of the charge into the air space may have been omitted in the narrative to him, and thus he may have been drawn into this helpless conclusion. I never saw the drawings of the gun until after the report of the accident. Captain Brooke, Chief of Ordnance of the Navy, with me then looked over the drawings and evolved the design of the air-chamber. After this the gun was fired, and with moderate elevations attained fair, but not remarkable ranges, as I was advised. The cracked gun was skillfully repaired at Charleston, and restored to a reliable condition. Just before the war closed the Tredegar Works had cast its first twelve-inch gun, after the method of Rodman—cast on a hollow core with water kept flowing in and
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