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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
e interchanged by the pickets near Trevilian. Custer was sent with his brigade by a wood-road to tho a position selected by General Custer; found Custer at a high board-fence, which separated him froil-fence, about a hundred yards on our right. Custer ordered every one to get out of there,--and wthe meanwhile part of Hampton's force attacked Custer, killing some of the men and horses of the batd horses, capturing about 350 men and horses. Custer sent his captures to his rear,--that is, towarton, was late in getting out that morning, and Custer, without knowing it, struck the road between tse up he espied a wagon-train, caissons, etc. (Custer's), and obligingly took them under his protection. The spoil included all of Custer's captures (except two hundred prisoners), his headquarters w, and by vigorously attacking Fitz Lee enabled Custer to retire in good order and rejoin the First Division. Torbert tried to communicate with Custer several times, without success until after noon[5 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The cavalry fight at Trevilian Station. (search)
the meantime had to care for the wounded and bury the dead. Sheridan's forces consisted of two divisions, the First commanded by General A. T. A. Torbert, and the Second by General D. McM. Gregg. The First Division was composed of the Reserve Brigade, 1st, 2d, and 5th U. S. Cavalry (Regulars), 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry, 1st New York Dragoons, commanded by Brigadier-General Wesley Merritt, the First Brigade consisting of the 1st, 5th, 6th, and 7th Michigan Cavalry, commanded by Brigadier-General G. A. Custer; the Second Brigade, 4th, 6th, and 9th New York Cavalry and 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry, commanded by Colonel T. C. Devin. The Second Division, commanded by General David McM. Gregg, was composed of two brigades, the First, commanded by General H. E. Davies, consisted of the 1st Massachusetts, 1st New Jersey, 10th New York, and 1st Pennsylvania. The Second Brigade was commanded by Colonel J. Irvin Gregg, and consisted of the 2d Pennsylvania, 4th Pennsylvania, 8th Pennsylvania, 13
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
d Kernstown. At the same time a brigade under Custer, making a reconnoissance on the Berryville-Winleft of the cavalry position. One regiment of Custer's brigade, dismounted, was moved up to the cre enemy, Torbert withdrew in good order, though Custer's brigade was pressed so closely that he was fon the flank of the pursuing infantry relieved Custer from danger, and the next morning he returned,mage was possible to the The rear-guard-general Custer's division retiring from Mount Jackson, Oche 8th of October the enemy's cavalry harassed Custer's division on the back road during the day, taike and extended across to the back road where Custer was concentrated. A stubborn cavalry engagemeght by the appearance of Rosser in the rear of Custer's picket line with his cavalry and one brigaderty-two miles to capture an exposed brigade of Custer's division on the right; but a change in the as a diversion in favor of Torbert's expedition Custer's cavalry was moved up the Valley to engage th[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
of West Virginia. Col. William H. Powell. First Brigade, Col. Alpheus S. Moore: 8th Ohio (detachment),; 14th Pa., Maj. Thomas Gibson; 22d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Andrew J. Greenfield. Brigade loss: w, 7. Second Brigade, Col. Henry Capehart: 1st N. Y., Maj. Timothy Quinn; 1st W. Va., Maj. Harvey Farabee; 2d W. Va., Lieut.-Col. John J. Hoffman; 3d W. Va., Lieut.-Col. John L. McGee. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 1; m, 1 = 3. Artillery: L, 5th U. S., Lieut. Gulian V. Weir. Third division, Brig.-Gen. George A. Custer. First Brigade, Col. Alexander C. M. Pennington, Jr.: 1st Conn., Capt. Edwin W. French; 3d N. J., Lieut.-Col. Charles C. Suydam; 2d N. Y., Capt. Andrew S. Glover; 5th N. Y., Maj. Theodore A. Boice; 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George A. Purington; 18th Pa., Maj. John W. Phillips. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 17; m, 8 = 27. Second Brigade, Col. William Wells: 3d Ind. (2 co's), Lieut. Benjamin F. Gilbert; 1st N. H. (batt'n), Col. John L. Thompson; 8th N: Y., Lieut.-Col. William H. Benjamin; 22d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
at sounded as if a couple of army corps had opened fire. The cavalry commanded by the gallant Merritt made a final dash, went over the earth-works with a hurrah, captured a battery of artillery, and scattered everything in front of them. Here Custer, Devin, Fitzhugh, and the other cavalry leaders were in their element, and vied with each other in deeds of valor. Crawford's division had advanced in a northerly direction, marching away from Ayres and leaving a gap between the two divisions. pture I saw men eating raw fresh meat as they marched in the ranks. I was informed at General Wright's headquarters, whither I was carried after my capture, that 30,000 men were engaged with us when we surrendered, namely, two infantry corps and Custer's and Merritt's divisions of cavalry. General J. Warren Keifer, in a pamphlet on the battle of Sailor's Creek, says: General A. P. Hill, a corps commander in General Lee's army, was killed at Petersburg, April 2d, 1865, and this, or some
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The surrender at Appomattox Court House. (search)
first and last great scenes of the War in Virginia were enacted upon his property.--H. P. Sheridan set a good example, however, by paying the proprietor twenty dollars in gold for the table at which Lee sat, for the purpose of presenting it to Mrs. Custer, and handed it over to her dashing husband, who started off for camp bearing it upon his shoulder. Ord paid forty dollars for the table at which Grant sat, and afterward presented it to Mrs. Grant, who modestly declined it, and insisted that s mind to delay his departure. that evening I made full notes of the occurrences which took place during the surrender, and from these the above account has been written. there were present at McLean's House, besides Sheridan, Ord, Merritt, Custer, and the officers of Grant's staff, a number of other officers and one or two citizens who entered the room at different times during the interview. Union soldiers sharing their rations with the Confederates. From a sketch made at the time.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
, Maj. James R. Dinnin; 19th N. Y. (1st N. Y. Dragoons), Maj. Howard M. Smith; 17th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Coe Durland; 20th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Gabriel Middleton. Third (Reserve) Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Gibbs: 2d Mass., Col. Casper Crowninshield; 6th Pa. (6 co's), Col. Charles L. Leiper; 1st U. S., Capt. Richard S. C. Lord; 5th U. S., Capt. Thomas Drummond, Lieut. Gustavus Urban; 6th U. S., Maj. Robert M. Morris. Artillery: C and E, 4th U. S., Capt. Marcus P. Miller. Third division, Brig.-Gen. George A. Custer. First Brigade, Col. Alexander C. M. Pennington: 1st Conn., Col. Brayton Ives; 3d N. J., Lieut.-Col. William P. Robeson, Jr.; 2d N. Y., Col. Alanson M. Randol; 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. A. Bayard Nettleton. Second Brigade, Col. William Wells: 8th N. Y., Maj. James Bliss; 15th N. Y., Col. John J. Coppinger; 1st Vt., Lieut.-Col. Josiah Hall. Third Brigade, Col. Henry Capehart: 1st N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Jenyns C. Battersby; 1st W. Va., Maj. Shesh B. Howe, Lieut.-Col. Charles E. Capehart; 2d
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
le, and represents the open common on the eastern end of the village, near that road. In the buildings, and also in the fence toward the right of the picture, a number of marks made by pistol-balls might then be seen. Here the battle began, and continued down the street seen near the center of the picture. on the flank and rear of General Farnsworth's brigade, on the common near the railway at the eastern end of the village. A severe battle ensued in the town and on its borders, when General Custer, who had advanced to Abbottsville, returned, and the Confederates were repulsed with the loss of a flag and fifty men. Farnsworth lost about-one hundred men. The gallant New York Fifth cavalry, led by Farnsworth and Major Hammond, bore the brunt of battle, and won high commendation. at this time Gettysburg was the focal point toward which the hostile armies were really tending, and circumstances speedily made the fields about that village the theater of a great battle, Gettysburg l
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
and fall on Kilpatrick's flank. This was done. At the same moment Stuart pressed his front, and Kilpatrick was driven back in some confusion, and a loss of over one hundred men made prisoners. The brunt of this heavy skirmish was borne by General Custer's brigade. On the following day, Lee crossed the Rappahannock, while Meade, in consequence of the destruction of the Orange and Alexandria railway, over which his supplies must pass, was unable to follow him further than Warrenton, for aboutrange plank road. The right and left columns of the army would thus be placed in close communication, on parallel roads. Gregg, with his cavalry, was to cross at Elly's Ford and take position on the extreme left; and to the cavalry divisions of Custer and Merritt was assigned the duty of watching the upper fords of the Rapid Anna and the trains at Richardsville. Meade had calculated the time of his march to the vicinity of Orange Court-House at not more than thirty-six hours, if all the pre
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
tions for murder at Libby Prison, presents another evidence of the wickedness of its leaders. In Dahlgren's special order, found in his pocket, he said: As General Custer may follow me, be careful not to give a false alarm. This referred to an expedition on which Custer set out, Feb. 27, 1864. for the purpose, chiefly, of divCuster set out, Feb. 27, 1864. for the purpose, chiefly, of diverting the attention of the Confederates from that of Kilpatrick. Custer crossed the Rapid Anna at Banks's Mills Ford, with fifteen hundred cavalry, These consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth Regulars, Sixth Ohio, Sixth Pennsylvania, First New York, and First New Jersey. in light marching order, flanked LCuster crossed the Rapid Anna at Banks's Mills Ford, with fifteen hundred cavalry, These consisted of detachments from the First, Second, and Fifth Regulars, Sixth Ohio, Sixth Pennsylvania, First New York, and First New Jersey. in light marching order, flanked Lee's army on the west, and pushed rapidly on by way of Madison Court-House to the Rivanna River at Berner's Bridge, within four miles of Charlottesville, where he was checked by a superior force, with a battery. Then he turned northward, in the direction of Stannardsville, skirmishing at times with Confederate cavalry; and then r
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