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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
the field, but as there was no chief nor special administration for the arm, and no regulations for its government, its organization, control, and direction were left to the fancies of the various army commanders. General officers were practically denied it, and in 1862 the War Department announced in orders that field-officers of artillery were an unnecessary expense and their muster into service forbidden. Promotion necessarily ceased, and such able artillerists as Hays, DeRussy, Getty, Gibbon, Griffin, and Ayres could only receive promotion by transfer to the infantry or cavalry. No adequate measures were taken for the supply of recruits, and the batteries were frequently dependent on the troops to which they were attached for men enough to work their guns in battle. For battery-draft they were often glad to get the refuse horses after the ambulance and quartermasters' trains were supplied. Still, many of the batteries attained a high degree of excellence, due mainly to the se
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
Twelfth Corps, General A. S. Williams,--vice Slocum, commanding the right wing,--to Culp's Hill, on Wadsworth's right; Second Corps to Cemetery Ridge — Hays's and Gibbon's divisions, from Ziegler's to the clump of trees, Caldwell's to the short ridge to its left and rear. This ridge had been occupied by the Third Corps, which was right of Birney's division, then retiring. The junction was not effected, and Humphreys, greatly outnumbered, slowly and skillfully fell back to Cemetery Ridge, Gibbon sending two regiments and Brown's Rhode Island battery to his support. But the enemy was strong and covered the whole Second Corps front, now greatly weakened bybesides this one. When Sickles was wounded General Meade directed Hancock to take command of the Third as well as his own corps, which he again turned over to Gibbon. About 7:15 P. M. the field was in a critical condition. Birney's division was now broken up; Humphreys's was slowly falling back, under cover of McGilvery's gu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.43 (search)
The council of war on the second day. taken by permission from the Philadelphia Weekly press of July 6th, 1887, and condensed.--editors. by John Gibbon, Major-General, U. S. V. Soon after all firing had ceased a staff-officer from army headquarters met General Hancock and myself and summoned us both to General Meade's headquarters, where a council was to be held. We at once proceeded there, and soon after our arrival all the corps commanders were assembled in the little front room of t its present position, or to retire to another nearer its base of supplies? 2. It being determined to remain in present position, shall the army attack or wait the attack of the enemy? 3. If we wait attack, how long I Page 2, Replies. Gibbon:1. Correct position of the army, but would not retreat. 2. In no condition to attack, in his opinion. 3. Until he moves. Williams:1. Stay. 2. Wait attack. 3. One day. Birney:Same as General Williams. Sykes:Same as General Williams. Newto
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.53 (search)
ing of the Third day. The 29th Pennsylvania forming line of battle on Culp's Hill at 10 A. M., July 3. angle between Gibbon and Caldwell. General Newton, having been assigned to the command of the First Corps, vice Reynolds, was now in charge osisting of his own batteries, reenforced by others from the Artillery Reserve. Well — to the right, in front of Hays and Gibbon, was the artillery of the Second Corps under its chief, Captain Hazard. Woodruff's battery was in front of Ziegler's Grokett's repulse, Wilcox's, Wright's, and Perry's brigades were moved forward, but under the fire of the fresh batteries in Gibbon's front, of McGilvery's and Rittenhouse's guns and the advance of two regiments of Stannard's Vermont brigade, they soon f Gettysburg. In this-hand-to-hand conflict General Armistead, of Piekett's Division, was killed, and General Webb, of Gibbon's Division, was wounded. farm-buildings, a few hundred yards distant. Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee were on his left, covered
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Repelling Lee's last blow at Gettysburg. (search)
y Edmund Rice, Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. A. The brigades of Harrow, Webb, and Hall, of Gibbon's division, Hancock's corps, occupied the crest on Cemetery Ridge on July 3d. The right of Hallsides watched this never-to-be-forgotten scene,--the grandeur of attack of so many thousand men. Gibbon's division, which was to stand the brunt of the assault, looked with admiration on the differenttrees which was the point of direction for Pickett's men; also the monument of Webb's brigade of Gibbon's division (Second Corps), near which General Alexander S. Webb was wounded. General Armistead,g, Hurrah! For the white trefoil! Clubs are trumps! Forward the white trefoil! [The badge of Gibbon's division — the Second, of the Second Corps--was a white trefoil.--editors.] This was one ofgs and making prisoners. Pickett's division lost nearly six-sevenths of its officers and men. Gibbon's division, with its leader wounded, and with a loss of half its strength, still held the crest.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
nset. Hancock, the commander of the left center; Sickles, the commander of the Third Corps, and Gibbon, commanding, in Hancock's absence, the Second, were desperately wounded. Such an unusual succesich it was worded or expressed. He said there was no objection to having it done. I called General Gibbon, who was present, and, I think, General Williams and General fngalls, and stated to them thach might be misunderstood. Some of these officers — I do not remember which; I am very sure General Gibbon was one--I think General Hancock was there, but whether he read it over or not I am not suren order which, if carried out, would have involved a retrograde movement of the army. General John Gibbon testified that General Butterfield asked him to read the order for retreat and to comparethe general commanding insist upon or advise a withdrawal of the army. On the same point, General Gibbon wrote: I never heard General Meade say one word in favor of a retreat, nor do I believe that
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
o the command of all the troops on the field of battle, relieving General Howard, who had succeeded General Reynolds. General Gibbon of the Second Division assumed command of the corps. These assignments terminated on the evening of July 1. Similarring the battle of the 2d, when General Hancock was put in command of the Third Corps, in addition to his own. He and General Gibbon were wounded on the 3d, and Brig.-Gen. William Hays was assigned to the command of the corps. Maj.-Gen. Winfield S. Hancock (w), Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon (w). Staff loss: w, 3. General Headquarters: D and K, 6th N. Y. Cav., Capt. Riley Johnson. Loss: k, 1; w, 3 = 4. First division, Brig.-Gen. John C. Caldwell. First Brigade, Col. Edward E. Cross (k), Col. H. Capt. John W. Reynolds (w), Capt. Moses W. Oliver. Brigade loss: k, 53; w, 281; m, 49 = 383. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon, Brig.-Gen. William Harrow. Staff loss: w, 3. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Harrow, Col. Francis E. Heat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
of battle along the Brock road, and Mott's and Gibbon's divisions on Birney's left; Barlow's divisiond.--A. S. W. Carroll's and Owen's brigades of Gibbon's division were sent in to support Getty, uponwas present when, at 5 o'clock, my brigade (of Gibbon's division) was ordered to relieve General Getward Birney with his own and Mott's divisions, Gibbon's division supporting, on the left of the Planattling against both Hill and Longstreet. General Gibbon had command on the left. Hancock himself Stevenson's division, coming into the line in Gibbon's first position, advanced north across Hancocad. On the morning of the second day Webb, of Gibbon, fought on, and north of, the Plank road, whiltrictly in his command. Hancock had the left, Gibbon the left of Hancock; Birney had his own and Moup reenforcements. At 1:30 P. M. Hancock sent Gibbon east ten miles to support Warren and Sedgwick.ho was on his left, and but little in front of Gibbon, who was on his right. He now laid three pont[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
d N. Y. (detachment 7th N. Y. attached), Maj. Henry M. Karples; 57th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Alford B. Chapman; 111th N. Y., Capt. Aaron P. Seeley; 125th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Aaron B. Myer; 126th N. Y., Capt. Winfield Scott. Fourth Brigade, Col. John R. Brooke: 2d Del., Col. William P. Baily; 64th N. Y., Maj. Leman W. Bradley; 66th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John S. Hammell; 53d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Richards McMichael; 145th Pa., Col. Hiram l. Brown; 148th Pa., Col. James A. Beaver. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon. Provost Guard: 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. Mahlon Black. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alex. S. Webb: 19th Me., Col. Selden Connor; 1st Co. Andrew (Mass.) Sharp-shooters, Lieut. Samuel G. Gilbreth; 15th Mass., Maj. I. Harris Hooper; 19th Mass., Maj. Edmund Rice; 20th Mass., Maj. Henry L. Abbott; 7th Mich., Maj. Sylvanus W. Curtis; 42d N. Y., Maj. Patrick J. Downing; 59th N. Y., Capt. William McFadden; 82d N. Y. (2d Militia), Col. Henry W. Hudson. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Josh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
. Joseph Hyde; 62d N. Y. (detachment 7th N. Y. attached), Capt. Henry P. Ritzius; 111th N. Y., Capt. Lewis W. Husk; 125th N. Y., Col. Levin Crandell; 126th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. William H. Baird. Fourth Brigade, Col. John R. Brooke: 2d Del., Maj. Peter McCullough; 7th N. Y. Art'y, Maj. Joseph M. Murphy; 64th N. Y., Capt. William Glenny; 66th N. Y., Col. Orlando H. Morris; 53d Pa., Capt. Henry S. Dimm; 145th Pa., Maj. Charles M. Lynch; 148th Pa., Col. James A. Beaver. Second division, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon. Rider. Provost Guard: 2d Co. Minn. Sharp-shooters, Capt. Mahlon Black. First Brigade, Col. Henry B. McKeen: 19th Me., Capt. Joseph W. Spaulding; 15th Mass., Maj. I. Harris Hooper; 19th Mass.,Capt. Morcena Dunn; 20th Mass., Capt. Henry L. Patten; 1st Co. Mass. Sharp-shooters, Lieut. Samuel G. Gilbreth; 7th Mich., Maj. Sylvanus W. Curtis; 42d N. Y., Lieut. John Maguire; 69th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Horace P. Rugg; 82d N. Y. (battalion), Lieut. Thomas Huggins; 184th Pa., Maj. Charles Kl
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