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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
nson, Waldo, 73. Hill, Thomas, 53, 105, 175. Hillard, G. S., 53, 175. Hinton, R. H., 215, 231. Hoar, E. R., 170, 175. Hoar, G. F., 162. Hoffman, Wickham, 62. Holmes, Abiel, 13. Holmes, John, 16, 39, 42. Holmes, O. W., 4, 13, 24, 31, 32, 53, 139, 154, 168, 171, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 182, z86. Homer, 92, Ioi. Hoole, John, 15. Hopkins, Louisa (Stone), 129. Home, R. H., 112. Horsford, E. N., 27. Houghton, Lord, 2, 289, 294, 297. Houghton, Mr., 34. Howard, John, 5. Howe, Julia Ward, 311. Howe, S. G., 142, 148, 150, 59, 176, 215, 221, 246. Howland, Joseph, 163. Hughes, Thomas, 297. Hugo, Victor, 298, 300, 301, 302, 303, 311, 313, 321. Humboldt, Baron F. H. A. von, 272. Hunter, David, 253, 256, 261, 262. Huntin, A., 225. Hurlbert (originally Hurlbut), W. H., 107, 109, 110, III. Hutchinson, Abby, 118, Ig9. Huxley, T. H., 272, 285. Irving, Washington, 12, 170, 187, 278. Jackson, C. T., 157. Jackson, J., 33x. James, Henry, senior, 175. James, H
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 2: the Worcester period (search)
ite handsome, for seventy cents a yard, to put in the study. This afternoon an African brother visits us, not for insurrectionary purposes, but to aid in putting down the same on the study floor. Of course I think enough about Brown, though I don't feel sure that his acquittal or rescue would do half as much good as his being executed; so strong is the personal sympathy with him. We have done what we could for him by sending counsel and in other ways that must be nameless. By we I mean Dr. Howe, W. Phillips, J. A. Andrew, and myself. If the trial lasts into next week, it is possible to make some further arrangements for his legal protection. But beyond this no way seems open for anything; there is (as far as one can say such a thing) no chance for forcible assistance, and next to none for stratagem. Never was there a case which seemed more perfectly impracticable: and so far as any service on the spot is concerned, there are others who could perform it better than I. Had I bee
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 3: Journeys (search)
ay to show you how ill-prepared we are for such emergencies. The busy give no time and the leisurely no energy, and there is no organization. I should except the Committee here, which has done admirably, and that in Concord, Massachusetts, and Dr. Howe, Sam Cabot, Charles Higginson, and a few others in Boston. There is talk now of sending Dr. Howe to Kansas with a large sum of money, and this will be the best thing possible, but it should have been done a fortnight ago. August 29 We Dr. Howe to Kansas with a large sum of money, and this will be the best thing possible, but it should have been done a fortnight ago. August 29 We have excellent news from Kansas. . . Our men are nicely settled in the northern part of Kansas, which is more peaceful. Colonel Topliff, who has just come from Lawrence, speaks quite encouragingly and thinks they can resist invasion. Meanwhile it will be probably necessary for me to go out West again for several weeks [he had previously been sent to Chicago and St. Louis to aid emigrants] to the Nebraska border, and perhaps some way inside. But my mission will not be a very warlike one, and
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Index. (search)
170-81; takes command 1st S. C. Vols. 181, 182; with the regiment, 182-221; up the St. Mary's, 185; up the St. John's, 185-91; wounded and on leave, 209, 210; returns to regiment, 210; resigns commission, 221; at Newport, 224-32, 235-74; and Julia Ward Howe, 228-35; and Harvard Memorial Biographies, 242; refers to Helen Hunt, 244-46; honors received, 252; at Mt. Auburn, 256, 257; and Thomas Hughes, 258, 259; and Woman's Suffrage, 263, 265, 270; and Emily Dickinson, 268; and Philological Convent., 225 ff., 252, 264, 266, 321 ff. Hoar, George, on Woman's Suffrage, 263. Holden, Mass., tavern at, 56-58. Holmes, John, 124. Holmes, Oliver Wendell, at Atlantic dinners, 106-12. Honey, Rev. C. R., of England, 285, 289, 290. Howe, Julia Ward, 113; accounts of, 228, 229, 259; and Town and Country Club, 230; letters to, 231-35; first woman member of National Institute of Arts and Letters, 234, 235. Howe, Samuel Gridley, and Kansas, 138, 139; death of, 230, 231. Howell, Mrs.,
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, III: the boy student (search)
re the members had frequent debates. Through the four years of college life Wentworth kept a minute account of all his doings in the form of a college journal. In these records are preserved, not only lists of books read, but of books I want to read, of pieces I can repeat; of bouquets (always composed of wild flowers he had gathered), with dates of presentation to his friends; of calls he had made, of drives and walks he had taken; and of the engagements and marriages of friends, as, Dr. Howe and Julia Ward of New York; Mr. Longfellow and Fanny Appleton. He was equally careful and minute about all his expenditures, the latter being a lifelong habit. At one time he seriously thought of making the law his profession, and with this end in view he made an inventory of all the lawyers in Boston, and of various law books. He was always a great pedestrian, often walking nine or ten miles a day, and taking evening walks with Parker far into the gloomy and desolate country, after wh
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VI: in and out of the pulpit (search)
s of its most seething mental activity; and died, like so many other good things, in endeavoring to be born. The effort to include women members failed, but he persisted in similar cases, as when much later he accomplished the admission of Julia Ward Howe to the Academy of Arts and Sciences. Of all the movements which claimed the young reformer's support, that of anti-slavery was nearest his heart. He wrote to his mother:— We have had another interesting beggar, viz. a colored brothHigginson's] was the most remarkable speech he ever heard; it held the audience spellbound; it was more remarkable for what it kept back and hinted at than what it said; there was a fire in the eye that made him tremble. W. Phillips said that Dr. Howe said we were on the eve of a revolution with that speech—nothing but Ellis's speech saved us. Yet it was very short and I was conscious of no such effects. In fact I walked in a dream all that week, but it tested me to the utmost . . . . Mee
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
to tell M. about it next day. The famous watering-place attracted many celebrities and a current newspaper reported that nearly the whole Atlantic force were permanent or summer residents of that place. The Town and Country Club, with Mrs. Julia Ward Howe for president and Colonel Higginson for vice-president, drew together these congenial spirits, and Mrs. Howe's home was always an attractive resort. Describing a visit to this spot, he exclaimed,—delicious there in valley! The sight and Mrs. Howe's home was always an attractive resort. Describing a visit to this spot, he exclaimed,—delicious there in valley! The sight and smell of wild flowers refreshed my soul—they are so rare here. To Newport and to Mrs. Dame's table drifted in those days sundry bright women, whose sparkling conversation and witty repartees made meal-time a brilliant occasion. One of these gifted women was Helen Hunt, who became an intimate friend of the Higginsons. The Colonel was glad to be her literary adviser, reading in manuscript all the Saxe Holm stories, whose authorship Mrs. Hunt struggled to keep a profound secret. After she be<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIV: return to Cambridge (search)
eemed her mission to pour oil on troubled waters. Nothing specially dainty or highbred about her, but no English awkwardness or brusquerie. A most mellow voice of course. Later the Boston Authors' Club was organized through the efforts of Mrs. Howe and Colonel Higginson, they bearing to it during the former's life the relations of president and vice-president. This association of interests brought to the latter many amusing letters from Mrs. Howe, usually beginning My dear Vice. One of Mrs. Howe, usually beginning My dear Vice. One of the members called this club Higginson's last plaything. Among the annual public gatherings which he frequently attended was the meeting of the Social Science Association at Saratoga, where he presided over the educational department or gave addresses. He sometimes lectured at Chautauqua which he called An innocent Saratoga. When he went forth on these expeditions to scream among his fellows, as an irreverent friend was fond of quoting from Bryant's Waterfowl, unforeseen difficulties some
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
n before us in the jury of honor. I knew as much of New Caledonia as Stanley at first of Livingstone, but recalled some English Higginson who had been in the papers as connected with copper mines there and it seems he is called Colonel too. What a chaos of Colonels! I said if it was necessary to patriotism that I should take the credit, I'd do my best. Of his further doings in the French capital, he wrote:— This was the day of the Congres Internationel de Droit des Femmes. . . . Mrs. Howe read a paper in French ... the language seemed to give a clearness and precision to her ideas and kept her from the clouds and she read with much dignity and sweetness. At the Theatre Francais he for the first time saw acting! ... Sarah Bernhardt seemed the legitimate successor of Rachel and Ristori—a blonde Rachel, tall and slender and stately and fearfully ill like her—but oh! such power, such expression by a glance, a whisper, a motion of the hand and such utter absence of the visi<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
. To Concord, Mass., to funeral of Judge Keyes [a classmate]. This excursion to Concord was violently opposed by his family, for he was obliged to go alone, his natural guardian being absent; but he was inexorable; delighted to escape from feminine control; and came back triumphant. May 26. At the notice of an hour or so prepared a talk on Theo. Parker for F. R.A. May 27. To Boston for lunch of Free Religious Association at which I spoke for the last time. Afterwards at Mrs. Howe's birthday reception. May 30. [Decoration Day.] To exercises in morning, marched with G. A.R. to chapel. June 10, 1910. Closing the care and labor of nearly two years [Genealogy]—my last literary work properly so called. I am now the sixth on the list of Harvard graduates. One of the reforms which interested Colonel Higginson in later years was Simplified Spelling. It must be confessed that he did not attempt to remodel his own way of writing, but he defined the movement
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