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truck, and General Floyd's column took up its line of march to the Kanawha Valley by the road running west of New River, through Fayette, Raleigh, Boone, &c., while Lee and Loring still remain on Sewell. It is the purpose of Gen. Floyd to strike the Kanawha about ten miles above Charleston, and thus throw himself in the rear of thved, will prove a most important and successful one. It is understood that the movement will be greatly strengthened by the speedy advance of the central column of Lee and Loring along the line of Rosencranz's retreat. You will not be surprised, therefore, if our combined forces winter in the rich valley of the Kanawha, and the eses to move a two-horse load, and even then it is a slow and tedious business. It is almost impossible for a horse to move out of a walk from General Floyd's to Gen. Lee's camp, and before we could take up our march on yesterday, we had to cut a new road nearly four miles long! It was impossible to move over the old road, and, e
7th N. C. Troops; Capt H. M. Dixon, 35th N. C. Troops; Major Petway, 35th N. C. Troops, and Col. C. C. Lee, 37th N. C. Troops; and there being no further evidence to introduce, the Court was closed, uit by the enemy's cavalry; that he than consulted with his men as to a surrender, stating that Col. Lee recommended a surrender, whereas Col. Lee advised no such course, but on the contrary, urged thCol. Lee advised no such course, but on the contrary, urged them to make a stand; that Col. Sinclair afterwards assisted in the formation of a rear guard and offered to remain with Col. Lee and the rear guard, and after the correction made by Col. Lee, encourageCol. Lee and the rear guard, and after the correction made by Col. Lee, encouraged the man to fight and not surrender, that after the regiment was against formed the retreat was orderly to the end. From these facts the court forms the opinion (as it has not the right to approCol. Lee, encouraged the man to fight and not surrender, that after the regiment was against formed the retreat was orderly to the end. From these facts the court forms the opinion (as it has not the right to approve or his approve of the conduct of Col. Sinclair on the occasion) that, under the present emergencies of the service, no farther proceeding is now necessary in the case. R. Ransom, Brig.-General,
Arrest of a Lunatic. "A man calling himself C. C. Lee, and hailing from Prince George county, advertised in the newspapers on Saturday his intention of delivering a religious lecture or discourse on the Capitol Square on Sunday. It seems he did so, but afterwards proceeded to get off, at the base of the Washington Monument, something in favor of the reconstruction of the Union. This being a subject on which debate is inadmissible, the orator was taken in custody by Capt. Macubbin, who delivering a religious lecture or discourse on the Capitol Square on Sunday. It seems he did so, but afterwards proceeded to get off, at the base of the Washington Monument, something in favor of the reconstruction of the Union. This being a subject on which debate is inadmissible, the orator was taken in custody by Capt. Macubbin, who deposited him in Castle Godwin. When carried there Lee asked to be put in a room will the word subjects, as he wished to correct them. His wish was granted.
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1863., [Electronic resource], The raid into Southwestern Virginia--depredations of the enemy. (search)
, to sail for England, where he expects to take command of a war steamer. --Ewell has taken the place of Stonewall Jackson, although he has but one leg. Report says Lee will soon make a forward movement. Stuart expects to make a raid from Orange into Pennsylvania. It is a truth, the rebel soldiers live on rats, and anything egrasp the plantations of several of the most prominent rebels — Seddon, Secretary of War; Anderson, of the Tredegar Iron Works; Hobson, son-in- law of Gen. Wise; C. C. Lee, brother of Gen. Lee; Harrison, Colonel at Drewry's Bluff; besides the farms of hundreds engaged in the Southern service. The damage done canal and railroad wasGen. Lee; Harrison, Colonel at Drewry's Bluff; besides the farms of hundreds engaged in the Southern service. The damage done canal and railroad was repaired in twenty-four hours after the retreat. Oh, sir! the universal cry here is to raise the black flag. Oh! for the hour when the avenging angel shall appear, with torch in one hand and the avenging sword of justice in the other, and consecrate to death and destruction this land and these people, rewarding them with a
From General Lee's Army. (From Our Own Correspondent) Army of Northern Virginia,near Petersburg, Va., September 10, 1864. Atlanta has fallen; Forts Powell, t out of service for years, if, indeed, they have ever shouldered arms. Let General Lee and Secretary Seddon will it, and these men can be under arms and acting as , North Carolina and South Carolina, will just now imitate her example, Hood and Lee can both receive in this way valuable and appreciable reinforcements. Let them stworks, whilst his old troops are disengaged for work on the flanks. Shall General Lee be reinforced by men, or shall this army, worn with the fatigue and exhaustiers, cooks, ambulance-drivers, clerks, and other detailed men, can reinforce General Lee five thousand men. Why should the authorities refuse the brave men in the trountry will be benefitted; if ignored, I will not answer for results. Reinforce Lee and Hood are the suggestions of prudence and common sense, which I cannot suppos
g since the New York Times published an article setting forth that the capture of Richmond, then confidently anticipated by the Northern public, would have no effect in "crushing the rebellion," unless it was also accompanied by the capture of General Lee's army. Grant, it was alleged, saw this with great distinctness, and hence had spread his nets in such a way that the army, which is the real capital of the rebellion, should not escape. It need not be said that even Richmond has not suce people of the United States. They are just now in a state of absurd elation over the fall of Atlanta; but the fall of Atlanta, they ought never to forget, did not involve the fate of General Hood's army — an army as large as that with which General Lee now confronts the enemy in Virginia. On the contrary, General Sherman is unable to advance at present; and his success is only one of those indecisive successes which have characterized this war on both sides from the beginning. Whether it c
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