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Essex, crashed through her side and penetrated her boiler, instantly killing both her pilots and flooding the vessel from stem to stern with scalding steam. The Essex, wholly disabled, drifted The Unlucky Essex after Fort Henry Commander W. D. Porter The thousand-ton ironclad Essex received the severest punishment at Fort Henry. Fighting blood surged in the veins of Commander W. D. Porter, son of Admiral David Porter and brother of Admiral David D. Porter. The gunboat which he leCommander W. D. Porter, son of Admiral David Porter and brother of Admiral David D. Porter. The gunboat which he led into action at Fort Henry was named after the famous Essex which his father commanded in the War of 1812. Fifteen of the shots from Fort Henry struck and told upon the Essex, the last one penetrating her armor and piercing her middle boiler. Commander Porter, standing among his men directing the fight, was terrible scalded by the escaping steam, as were twenty-seven others. Wrongly suspected of disloyalty at the outbreak of the war, Commander Porter's conduct during the struggle gave the lie
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The sea life of 1861: life on the Federal war-ships (search)
on that place. The troops with the aid of the Federal gunboats were defeated. Then Commander W. D. Porter started up-stream with the Essex. As he approached the Arkansas, a few well-directed shots disabled her so that she became unmanageable. Porter, seeing his advantage, loaded with incendiary shells, but at the first discharge the Arkansas was seen to be already ablaze. Porter and his men redoubled their efforts. The Arkansas managed to get near enough in-shore to make fast but her cablePorter and his men redoubled their efforts. The Arkansas managed to get near enough in-shore to make fast but her cable burnt away, and drifting again into the current she blew up. The Essex had accomplished the destruction of the last Confederate ram operating on the Mississippi River. William young, gunner's mate of the Essex Four picked men gunners' crew of the Essex received large sums. If other vessels were in a certain radius of distance or attached to the same station, they also had a share in the money awarded by the prize-courts, and an escaping blockade-runner would remind one of a hare purs
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Light Infantry, 1807-1861. (search)
y William Lownes in 1807, upon receiving the news of the Leopard and Chesapeake affair, its roll of thirteen commanders down to 1861, reveals the character of its membership-Lowndes, Cross, Crafts, Simons, Miller, Gilchrist, Ravenel, Lee, Jervey, Porter, Walker, Hatch, Simonton. The public observance of Washington's birthday, by an oration and social functions, on 22d February, was an annual feature of W. L. I. life, and the annual response from the community indicated the highest public favobellum career of the corps there was maintained an esprit de corps, watchful and virile. Success was the rallying cry, and without a single failure, uniformly crowned all company efforts. Witness the great parade of 4th July, 1846, under Captain W. D. Porter, with one hundred and forty-six members in line; and, fourteen years later, on 4th July, 1860, under Captain C. H. Simonton, with one hundred and forty-four members in line; both parades decisive tests of company pride and strength. Furth
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of members from the three companies of the war, 1860-1865. (search)
Hanahan, J. S. Jamison, W. H. Johnson, C. H. Lovegreen, L. B. Lanneau, J. B. Locke, P. P. Muckenfuss, W. M. Martin, J. C. Malloy, L. E. McDowell, R. H. O'Sullivan, T. F. Parker, Dr. F. L. Pennal, R. E. Phelps, J. B. Robb, James. Reneker, F. W. Roy, Robert. Simonton, C. H. Simons, W. Seyle, S. H. Stocker, J. D. Schulte, J. H. Taylor, F. E. Trumbo, A. S. Warren, B. W. Welch, S. E. Graham, S. G. Honour, J. L. Honour, T. A. Holmes, Wm. E. Houston, J. H. Jones, D. H. Lloyd, E. W. Lanneau, W. S. Lebby, T. D. Muckenfuss , W. G. Marsh, D. C. Mulkai, T. D. Moffett, G. H. Olney, H. B. Porter, Rev. A. T. Prevost, Clarence. Parry, R. E. Proctor, W. E. Reneker, J. H., Jr. Riecke, Gerhard. Robertson, D. P. Simons, T. G., Jr. Lucas, Sheppard, J. L. Stewart, R. Steinmyer, W. H. Schreiner, J. H., Jr. Taft, A. W. Woodbury, S. B. Williams, H. H.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of members (search)
Gale, R. W. Hughes, E. T. Hyde, J. B. Hammett, A. C. Klinck, G. W. Lanneau, C. B. LeBleaux, L. F. Lawton, P. T. Lynah, E., Jr. Martin, H. O. Mintzing, J. F. Matthews, Chris'r McCabe, B. F. O'Brien, A. F. Porter, J. H. Pemberton, G. W. Ravenel, Dr. W. C. Richards, F., Jr., Simons, T. G., Sr. Salas, F. P. Sanders, J. O'H. Snowden, W. E. Smythe, E. A. Stocker, J. B. Torley, J. E. Walker, Joseph Walker, C. I. Willis, JH. W. Gilliland, A. Howell, S. S. Hughes, T. S. Honour, W. E. Harper, F. M. Kingman, J. W. Logan, S., M. D. Lea, A. C. Lee, J. Moultrie Marion, John Morris, W. R. Mikell, W. E. McQueen, D. Olney, C. C. Porter, W. H. Pringle, W. A., Jr. Prince, A. Robertson, J. L. Robertson, D. C. Smythe, A. T. Sanders, L. N. Small, Jno. J. Snowden, W. H. Seigling, R. Tennant, Wm. Trim, W. J. Wilkie, Oct. Willis, Ed. Walpole, J.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Fourth action of the Arkansas. (search)
speed. On the 21st of July, Flag Officers Farragut, Davis and W. D. Porter held a council of war on board the Benton, at which Commander PoCommander Porter volunteered the service of the Essex to make an effort to destroy the Arkansas; and the following programme was agreed on: That onby the Arkansasin the early morning fight on the Yazoo River. W. D. Porter, commanding the Esssex, reports: On the morning of the 22d, I gois charge of having no relief or assistance was sharply resented by Porter's superiors. Flag Officer Farragut writes to Davis: I regret to sa to you how much I was disappointed and chagrined at the results of Porter's fight this morning. It appears that in the first place he missedeir skilful management of her in loosening their shorefast, whereby Porter slipped by her and ran ashore. Then Flag Officer Davis writes Farre was killed and no one even seriously wounded. * * * I charge Commodore Porter, in his statement of the conduct of the Benton, and other ves
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The end of the Arkansas. (search)
what we had on, which, being our fighting rig, was rather scanty. The reports made by the commander of the Essex, W. D. Porter, were found to be so little supported by the facts of the case (See Official Records, Vol. 19, pp 117-127,) that they guage used by the latter is: Any virtuous and brave man cannot fail to be shocked at the extraordinary assertions of Commander Porter in relation to the part both the Essex and Cayuga took in the affair. * * It was precisely no fight at all. * * As n one-quarter of a mile nearer the enemy, and her fire was only occasional at that great distance. * * * Subsequently Captain Porter explained to me that he had intended to have the honor of destroying the Arkansas all to himself, but that on his appnation as I hoped they would, but sufficient to satisfy themselves that there was no justification for the report of Commander Porter. * * They fully proved that he had determined to attack her alone, and only wanted Fairfax to be in supporting dista
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
nd, Stonewall Jackson was in the Valley fighting a series of battles. On the 26th of June the Confederate army was engaged with McClellan at Mechanicsville, which is near the Confederate capital. Our army suffered severely in this fight. On the 27th my regiment, brigade and division, under General D. H. Hill, took part in the battle of Gaines' Mill, near Cold Harbor, which proved to be one of the most hotly contested battles in which we were ever engaged. The enemy was commanded by General Porter. They had long lines of infantry, in double column, and numerous batteries of artillery, on top of a hill. It became our duty to cross a creek in a swamp, and the enemy had cut the timber so as to impede the advance of our attacking force. I can never forget that when in a short distance of the enemy we made a halt and I was placed in command of a detachment of four men from each company, and ordered to deploy in their front, and shoot the cannoneers who were doing fatal damage in ou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, W. H., 96 Patton, Colonel G. W., killed, 284 Pegram's Brigade, glories of, 61 Peters U. C. V., Colonel Winfield, 26 Petersburg Military Park, 352 Porcher, Francis Peyre, 161 Port Hudson, strategic value of, 83; seige of, 86 Porter, General Fitz. John, 32 Porter, Commander W. D., false reports by, 32 Powell, D. D., Rev. W. C. 290 Powers, Colonel Frank, 83 Preaching in Camp, 289 Private Soldier of C. S. A., The, 65, 111 Purcell, Mrs. John B., 26 RandolphPorter, Commander W. D., false reports by, 32 Powell, D. D., Rev. W. C. 290 Powers, Colonel Frank, 83 Preaching in Camp, 289 Private Soldier of C. S. A., The, 65, 111 Purcell, Mrs. John B., 26 Randolph, Lt. J. Tucker, 58; Norman V., 58 Re-enlistment in Army, 258, 269 Rodes, General R. E. and family, 281, 282 Rodgers Robert L., 306 Rogers, Rev. E. J., 289 Rosser, D. D., Rev. L., 235, 290 St. Johns' Church Richmond, Va., 194 Saunders, General J. C. C., 360 Scott, Dr. Wm. Wallace 292 Semmes, General Paul J., 105 Seven Days Battles, 223 Seven Pines, Battle of, 218 Sharpsburg or Antietam Battle of, a bloody contest, 110; 15th Va. at 97; losses as compared with t
, 322, 324; and staff, IV., 221, 222; V., 35, 38; VIII., 356; X., 183, 198. Porter, H.: III., 81; VIII., 185, 226, 235; IX., 112, 113, 115, 182; X., 19, 49. Porter, J. C., II., 320. Porter, J. L., VI., 140, 144, 154, 155. Porter, W. D.: I., 74 seq., 77, 78 seq., 94, 183 seq.;II., 198; VI., 226, 316. Porter's independent forces, Confederate, II., 320. Porterfield, J., Confederate agent, VIII., 300. Portland, Me., L, 88. Portsmouth, Va., L, 364. PPorter's independent forces, Confederate, II., 320. Porterfield, J., Confederate agent, VIII., 300. Portland, Me., L, 88. Portsmouth, Va., L, 364. Portsmouth,, U. S. S., VI., 183, 190. Posey, C., X., 153. Post, P. S., X., 201. Post office of the Army of the Potomac Viii., 33, 35. Posts, G. A. R., origin of, X., 290. Potato-digging by Grant's men, VIII, 198-199. Potosi, Mo., L, 350. Potomac, The Army of the (see also Army of the Potomac), I., 282. Potomac Creek, Va.: bridge over, V., 272; VII., 41. Potomac River: I., 62; in Virginia, II., 19, 56; in Maryland and Virginia, II., 229; view o
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