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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
, and died Jan. 28, 1859. His father, Judge William Prescott, died Dec. 8, 1844, at the age of eighterested in the literary work of his friends, Prescott, Bancroft, Sparks, Story, and Greenleaf,—all m a dinner at the Tremont House, where Story, Prescott, Bancroft, Ticknor, Choate, Hillard, Felton, asions when Morpeth was entertained by Story, Prescott, and Longfellow. The Earl of Carlisle (Lorroft, Ticknor, Longfellow, R. W. Emerson, and Prescott.—Speeches, Lectures, and Poems of the Earl ofors in Boston had always stood open to him,—Mr. Prescott's and my brother's. His conversation was riant, where we had a very pleasant dinner with Prescott, who regretted much that you could not come. t of General Miller to Nahant is mentioned in Prescott's Life, p. 171. Lieber is here still; he leavreenleaf is engaged upon a work on Evidence. Prescott, you know, is writing the Conquest of Mexico. he will carry on slowly through the summer. Prescott has completed the introduction to his history<
f two brigades; one under the command of Brigadier-general Heath, embraced the regiments of General Heath, and Colonels Patterson, Scammon, Phinney, Gerrish, and Prescott; the other, under the immediate command of General Putnam, comprehended the regiments of Colonels Glover, Frye, Bridge, Woodbridge, and Sargeant. Frothingham'r Two. Colonel Patterson's Regiment at Number Three. Colonel Scammon's Regiment at Number One. Colonel Phinney's Regiment at North of Number Two. Colonel Prescott's Regiment at Cambridge. Colonel Glover's Regiment at Cambridge. Colonel Frye's Regiment at Cambridge. Colonel Bridge's Regiment at Cambridge. Cotone, John Tidd, James Tufts, John Warland, Thomas Warland. Abraham Watson, Jr., was Surgeon of Col. Gardner's Regiment, and James Winthrop was aid-de-camp to Gen. Prescott. Besides the private soldiers whose names appear on the before mentioned rolls of the two companies commanded by Capt. Samuel Thatcher and Capt. Benjamin Lock
ere Grace, b. 15 Nov. 1668, d. 16 Nov. 1680; Elizabeth, b. 11 Ap. 1670, d. 22 June 1674; John, b. 22 Nov. 1671, d. 20 Dec. 1673; Hannah, b. 16 Aug. 1674, prob. d. young; Thomas, b. 22 Aug. 1676, d. 22 May 1683; Samuel, b. 18 May 1679, d. young; John, b. 9 July 1683, d. 23 Sept. 1683; Nathaniel, b. 1 Feb. 1684-5; Mary, b. 20 Mar. 1687-8; Sarah, b. 14 Nov. 1690, m. Rev. Caleb Trowbridge of Groton 10 Mar. 1714; Abigail, b.——m. Benjamin Prescott of Groton 12 June 1718, and was mother of Col. William Prescott of Bunker Hill memory, and his brothers, James, Sheriff and Judge C. C. P., and Oliver, Judge of Probate for Middlesex County; Peter; Thomas, b. 17 July 1700, grad. H. C. 1719, a schoolmaster; Samuel, b. 12 Jan. 1702-3, d. unm. 2 Dec. 1729. Thomas the f. was brought here when a child by his mother, whom. Edward Jackson. He settled in that part of the town which now forms the westerly border of Brighton District, but retained his connection with the Church at Newton, of which he
ere Grace, b. 15 Nov. 1668, d. 16 Nov. 1680; Elizabeth, b. 11 Ap. 1670, d. 22 June 1674; John, b. 22 Nov. 1671, d. 20 Dec. 1673; Hannah, b. 16 Aug. 1674, prob. d. young; Thomas, b. 22 Aug. 1676, d. 22 May 1683; Samuel, b. 18 May 1679, d. young; John, b. 9 July 1683, d. 23 Sept. 1683; Nathaniel, b. 1 Feb. 1684-5; Mary, b. 20 Mar. 1687-8; Sarah, b. 14 Nov. 1690, m. Rev. Caleb Trowbridge of Groton 10 Mar. 1714; Abigail, b.——m. Benjamin Prescott of Groton 12 June 1718, and was mother of Col. William Prescott of Bunker Hill memory, and his brothers, James, Sheriff and Judge C. C. P., and Oliver, Judge of Probate for Middlesex County; Peter; Thomas, b. 17 July 1700, grad. H. C. 1719, a schoolmaster; Samuel, b. 12 Jan. 1702-3, d. unm. 2 Dec. 1729. Thomas the f. was brought here when a child by his mother, whom. Edward Jackson. He settled in that part of the town which now forms the westerly border of Brighton District, but retained his connection with the Church at Newton, of which he
ngell, 328. Phillips, 117, 207, 255-7. Phinney, 423. Phipps, 211, 26. Phips, 112-15, 27, 30, 3, 53, 7, 68-70, 5, 6, 307, 10, 53, 4, 403, 7. Piambow, 391. Pickering, 321. Pickman, 310. Pigeon, 308. Pittimee, 391. Plympton, 168, 204, 435, 8. Pomeroy, 310. Poole, 8, 32, 116. Porter, 231, 6. 88. Post, 33. Powers, 319. Pratt, 20, 4, 6, 7, 32, 5, 76, 233. Prentice. or Prentiss, 4, 59, 76, 80, 1, 92, 4, 118, 214, 88, 92, 305, 92. 4, 400, 31. Prescott, 185, 288, 423. Price, 2 87. Prince, 33, 247. Prout, 272. Prudden, 49, 50. Pryor, 331. Putnam, 187, 423, 4, 6. Pynchon, 6, 8, 27, 398. Quincy, 42, 275, 82, 304, 65. Randolph, 76, 7, 95, 6, 103– 8. Ravenscroft, 110. Rawson, 99, 350, 1, 89, 98. Ray, 321. Raymond, 342. Read, 201, 31, 92, 324, 40, 427, 8. Reading, 11, 32. Reed, 201, 31, 92, 324, 40, 427, 8. Remington, 124, 5, 35, 224, 7, 88, 375, 94, 8. Reyle, 76. Rice, 36, 339. Richa
ks. Holmes. Nowell. Shepard, Walton. Winthrop. Oakes, 616, 17. Angler. Dudley. Flint. Hayward. Jenkins. Sewall. Sweetser. Waite. Oldham, 617. Brown. Chadwick. Dana. Fessenden. Frothingham. Gates. Parks. Reed. Wood. Oliver, 618-20. Angier. Belcher. Bradish. Bradstreet. Brattle. Brown. Cheever. Frost. Gerry. Jackson. Lowell. Manning. Mattucks. Newgate. Noves. Prentice. Prescott. Royal. Sparhawk. Trowbridge. Vassall. Wendell. Williams. Wilson. Wiswall. Wyman. Olmstead, 620. Osland, 620. Hyde. Paul. Pratt. Prentice. Wilson. Paddlefoot, 620, Blanford. Eames. Paine, 621. Palfrey, 621. Bordman. Goddard. Hicks. Williams. Palmer, 621. Bemis. Child. Cooper. Day. Ellis. Fessenden. Gamage. Gibbs. Jones. Parker. Stratton. Walker. Warland. Whitney. Wiswal
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
, but we so abused one another that I afterwards destroyed them. At this period I very much frequented the families of Mr. Stephen Higginson, Mr. S. G. Perkins, Mr. Richard Sullivan, Mr. William Sullivan, Dr. John C. Warren, Senior, and Mr. William Prescott. But my first real sight and knowledge of the world was in the winter of 1814-15, when I made a journey to Virginia,—then a serious undertaking,—and for three months was thrown much on my own resources, in the Atlantic cities, as far sowhich he barely escaped with his life. I have seldom been so much interested and entertained. We arrived at Hartford on Saturday afternoon. The Convention, as I have said, was in session. The members from Massachusetts—Mr. George Cabot, Mr. William Prescott, Mr. H. G. Otis, Mr. Timothy Bigelow, Mr. Stephen Longfellow, Mr. Wilde, and Mr. Waldo—had taken a house, and lived by themselves. We called on them immediately. Mr. Otis alone was at home, detained, by a committee, from the morning se
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
of the College. I then went to Mr. Prescott. Hon. William Prescott, then a member of the Corporation. The management nearly three hundred pages—was composed of Dr. Porter, Mr. Prescott, and Mr. Lowell, all working men. And they did work faithfully. Mr. Prescott, in particular, made an abstract of the opinions of each respondent, arranged under the appropriate hformer officers; and Mr. W. Sullivan, former Overseer. Mr. Prescott and Mr. Otis were kept away by having to attend a meetiion of the College. This we knew would be agreeable to Mr. Prescott and Mr. Otis, who thought the work could not be carriedmittee of the Corporation, consisting of the President, Mr. Prescott, and Mr. Otis, was appointed, July 25, to confer with tdingly, at the request of Judge Story, Mr. Webster, and Mr. Prescott, wrote an article on the subject for the North Americanrseers, together with suggestions from Sir. Webster and Mr. Prescott, in order to put on record, in a permanent form, the gr
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
ployers; and have the whole made a Capitol of the knowledge of the town, with its uses, which I would open to the public, according to the admirable direction in the Charter of the University of Gottingen, Quam commodissime, quamque latissime. Mr. Prescott, Judge Jackson, Dr. Bowditch, and a few young men are much in earnest about it. . . . . We went the other night to a great ball at Colonel Thorndike's, a part of which extended into your house, The two houses were connected by doors, whiAmong the rest, the work about Columbus, which is very curious, and ought to be translated bodily, as well as melted down, by Irving, into an interesting and elegant piece of biography . . . . In April, 1828, Mr. Ticknor went with his friend Prescott to Washington, being absent from home about three weeks, during which he very much enjoyed the society of his companion, and that of Mr. Webster, with whom they spent nearly all their time in Washington. He also saw many other friends and inter
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
his fixed habit of industry he used often to quote with delight what was once said to him by Judge Prescott, his friend, and the father of his friend. Soon after his return from Europe, in 1819, he was talking one evening with Judge Prescott, and said of his own prospects, that he had enough work mapped out to fill at least ten years. Take care always to be able to say the same thing; always haveriendship for him was full of sympathy. During this visit the following hasty letter went to Mr. Prescott:— my dear William,—Mr. Webster has been out shooting all day, and brought home a fineillard, already quoted. of the persons who gathered at these suppers:— I recall the two Messrs. Prescott, father and son; Mr. Webster; the Rev. Dr. Channing; Dr. Bowditch, the eminent mathematiciaseldom, but it was there I first saw him, and there, also, I first saw Mr. Webster in private. Prescott, the historian, not yet an author, was at that time in the full flush of his early manhood, run<
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