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ons of a leading journal, which soon after became, and has since remained, a noisy oracle of Secession. the time-honored organ of her Whig Conservatives, who had secured her vote for Bell and Everett, had been changed — by purchase, it was said — and was now as zealous for Secession as hitherto against it. Finally, her Convention resolved, on the 4th aforesaid, to send new Commissioners to wait on President Lincoln, and appointed Messrs. William Ballard Preston, Alex. H. H. Stuart, and George W. Randolph (of whom the last only was formerly a Democrat, and was chosen as a Secessionist), to proceed to Washington on this errand. They did not obtain their formal audience until the 13th--the day of Fort Sumter's surrender — when its bombardment, if not its capture also, was already known in that city — and there was a grim jocosity in their appearance at such an hour to set before the harassed President such a missive as this: Whereas, in the opinion of the Convention, the uncertainty
wther signs himself Colonel, are the Partisan Rangers, permission to raise which band of guerrillas is given from Richmond in the rebel commission copied below. War Department, Richmond, May 29, 1862. Major Robert R. Lawther, Present: sir: Upon the recommendation of Major-Gens. Price and Van Dorn you are authorized to raise a regiment of partisan rangers, to be enlisted and mustered into service for the war, and to be composed of companies of infantry and of cavalry, as may be found practicable, each company to be fully organized as required for other companies of like arm. The men are entitled to bounty, but must furnish their own arms and equipments so far as possible, and the mounted men their own horses. You will be commissioned with proper rank as soon as the corps is completed, whether regiment or battalion. The other officers must be elected. Report for duty to the General commanding the department in which the men are enlisted. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War.
e Peninsula, to which they do not refer. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. Bankhead Magruder, Major-General. From General Lee to Secretary of War. headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, August 14, 1862. Hon. G. W. Randolph, Secretary of War, Richmond, Virginia: sir: I have the honor to transmit the report of Major-General Magruder, and the officers of his command, of the operations in the late engagements around Richmond. At the request of General Magrud that of Lieutenant-Colonel Carey. I am, sir, very respectfully yours, J. Bankhead Magruder, Major-General commanding. [no. 2.] General Magruder to the Secretary of War. Fairfield race-course, near Richmond, August 13, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War: Sir: I have the honor to request that you will change the Thirty-second regiment Virginia volunteers, mentioned in my report, immediately after the name of Colonel Tomlin, into the Fifty-third Virginia regiment, whi
rnment, and was mustered in on the 26th of that month. The battalion made its mark at Bull Run on July 18th, but its most conspicuous service was at Fredericksburg, in December, 1862, when from Marye's Heights it played an important part in repulsing repeated assaults of the Union troops. Its strength was afterward much reduced, and in Virginia the batteries consisted of three guns each. Next in importance was the Richmond Howitzers, organized at the time of the John Brown raid by George W. Randolph, afterward Confederate Secretary of War. In 1861, it was recruited up to three companies and formed into a battalion, though in the field the first company was never associated with the other two. It has been said that the flower of the educated youth in the South gravitated toward the artillery, and it is claimed that over one hundred men were commissioned from this corps, of every rank from that of second lieutenant to Secretary of War. One of its features was the Howitzer Glee Clu
ave the Federal Government an excess of prisoners which it was unwilling to release on parole. As the next move on the chess-board, the Confederate Government refused longer to make individual exchanges on the ground that, as political pressure in many cases caused the Federal Government to ask for the exchange of certain individuals, those who had no influential friends would be left in prison. On a letter of General McClellan proposing an exchange, the Confederate Secretary of War, G. W. Randolph, Colonel Robert Ould Confederate agent for the exchange of prisoners The most important person in the exchange of prisoners in the South was Colonel Robert Ould. His appointment as Confederate agent for exchange came immediately after the signing of the agreement to exchange prisoners, July 22, 1862. When Virginia left the Union, Colonel Ould followed his State. He served for a short time as Assistant Secretary of War. His relations with Colonel William H. Ludlow, the Federal a
t in the political life of Virginia for thirty years, having served as a member of the State Legislature and in the United States House of Representatives. He had been a determined opponent of secession, declaring that the State had no right to secede, and that the leaders in the South were conspirators. After the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus, he was arrested March 2, 1862, in his home in Richmond, and confined for several weeks. Through a personal interview with Secretary of War George W. Randolph, he finally obtained permission to remain in his own home in Richmond, upon taking an oath to say nothing prejudicial to the Confederacy. Tiring of confinement in his house, he purchased a farm in Culpeper County and removed there in January, 1863, where he denounced and criticised secession and the seceders to the Confederate officers who often were his guests. His home was always full of visitors, and Confederate officers and Union generals often sat at his table. He was
njustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansas with a number of her own servants and went to the seat of war in the West, serving first at Memphis, then at Belmo
njustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hospitals, where they read to the convalescents, wrote letters for them, and fed them. Mrs. Felicia Grundy Porter, of Nashville, gave freely of her time and means; Mrs. Gilmer, of Pulaski, Tennessee, served as nurse and matron at various hospitals; Mrs. Ella Newsom, a wealthy young widow, left her home in Arkansas with a number of her own servants and went to the seat of war in the West, serving first at Memphis, then at Belmo
eration of the Confederate army, the part played by President Davis must be borne in mind; also the fact that he previously had seen service in the United States army and that he had been Secretary of War of the United States. As Secretaries of War in the Confederate States Government there were associated with President Davis, the following: LeRoy Pope Walker, of Alabama, February 21, 1861, to September 17, 1861; Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, September 17, 1861, to March 17, 1862; George W. Randolph, of Virginia, March 17, 1862, to November 17, 1862: Major-General Gustavus W. Smith, of Kentucky, November 17, 1862, to November 21, 1862; James A. Seddon, of Virginia, from November 21, 1862, to February 6, 1865; and Major-General John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, February 6, 1865, to the close of the war. Unlike the Union army there were generals, both regular and of the provisional army, as well as lieutenant-generals; it being the intention that every commander of an army shoul
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
re, in command of Reserves defending Richmond. Edwin G. Lee, on special service. James B. Terrell led Pegram's old brigade at the Wilderness. Robert H. Chilton, Lee's adjutant-general. Seth M. Barton led a brigade in Lee's Army. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War in 1862. William C. Wickham fought Sheridan before Richmond. Eppa Hunton led a brigade in Pickett's division. Gracie, Arch., Jr. , Nov. 4, 1863. Gray, Henry, Mar. 17, 1865. Grayson, John B., Aug. 15, 1861. Green5, 1861. Pillow, Gideon J., July 9, 1861. Polk, Lucius E., Dec. 13, 1862. Preston, William, April 14, 1862. Pryor, Roger A., April 16, 1862. Quarles, Wm. A., Aug. 25, 1863. Rains, G. J., Sept. 23, 1861. Rains, James E., Nov. 4, 1862. Randolph, G. W., Feb. 12, 1862. Ransom, M. W., June 13, 1863. Reynolds, A. W., Sept. 14, 1863. Richardson, R. V., Dec. 1, 1863. Ripley, Roswell S., Aug. 15, 1861. Roberts, Wm. P., Feb. 21, 1865. Robertson, B. H., June 9, 1862. Robertson, J. B., Nov.
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