Your search returned 396 results in 86 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
nd shall be entirely abandoned for the future. I shall, therefore, await anxiously your reply, after referring to the authorities of the Confederate States. I am, etc., Russell. J. M. Mason, Esq., J. Slidell, Esq., J. Mann, Esq. Secretary of state Seward to Hon. Charles F. Adams, United States Minister to England.—(Extract.) Department of state, Washington, March 9, 1865. In accordance with Earl Russell's suggestion, the Secretary of War has, by direction of the President, transmit written on that occasion to the Secretary of War, and so soon as we shall have received a report from the Lieutenant-General of his proceedings in the matter, I will communicate the result to you for the information of Earl Russell. Secretary of state Seward to Secretary of War Stanton. Department of state. Washington, March 8, 1865. sir: The enclosed paper has been received at this department from Earl Russell, her Britannic Majesty's principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
ent was handed to him for perusal. He looked at him and said: Shall we make it $50,000? But I obeyed orders, and $16,000 was ordered to be paid. Upon the receipt of the money, Page paid off the crew to May 19, 1865, and delivered the Stonewall into the hands of the Captain-General of Cuba. In July, 1865, she was delivered to the government of the United States, and the conditions of the surrender are set out in the annexed correspondence between the Spanish Minister at Washington and Mr. Seward, the United States Secretary of State. She was subsequently sold by the United States to the government of Japan. Technical questions. It may be thought by those who are inclined to be severely critical that in the arrangements for despatching the City, of Richmond, some liberty was taken with the municipal law of England, and that there was some violation of her neutral territory. Scarcely anyone, however, will maintain that the shipment of arms by the steamer was illegal; and the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
lated; and he further accused Lincoln of managing the war for personal ends. Seward has been much criticised, and accused of rare presumption, for a letter that hsuperiority and condescendingly offered his advice and aid. It is probable that Seward did feel something of the contempt for Lincoln that his brethren in the Cabinetrequently showed to his face throughout their long terms of office. Like them, Seward was a man of the highest social standing and of large experience in the highesthumility, but there is a much more obvious way of accounting for them. Whether Seward's letter gave offense or not, it suggested the policy that Lincoln adopted, whif the war nor the emancipation would have been possible. The policy advised in Seward's letter is, Change the question before the public from the one upon slavery foestion upon Union or Disunion. The letter did not come to light for years, and Seward might well say, as he did, that Lincoln had a cunning that was genius. See Don
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
lated; and he further accused Lincoln of managing the war for personal ends. Seward has been much criticised, and accused of rare presumption, for a letter that hsuperiority and condescendingly offered his advice and aid. It is probable that Seward did feel something of the contempt for Lincoln that his brethren in the Cabinetrequently showed to his face throughout their long terms of office. Like them, Seward was a man of the highest social standing and of large experience in the highesthumility, but there is a much more obvious way of accounting for them. Whether Seward's letter gave offense or not, it suggested the policy that Lincoln adopted, whif the war nor the emancipation would have been possible. The policy advised in Seward's letter is, Change the question before the public from the one upon slavery foestion upon Union or Disunion. The letter did not come to light for years, and Seward might well say, as he did, that Lincoln had a cunning that was genius. See Don
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Peace conference [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, February 25, 1900.] (search)
e, I answer with pleasure. On January 29, 1865, the Confederate commissioners—Stephens, Hunter and Campbell—left Richmond to meet the Federal commissioners at Fort Monroe. There, on January 31st, they met in conference President Lincoln and Mr. Seward, Secretary of State. The conference lasted four hours, and Mr. Stephens, Vice-President of the Confederate States, has left on record a detailed report of the discussion there. Mr. Stephens pressed for a secret military convention betweenlition of slavery, as stated. But, on this subject, he said, he could give no assurance; enter into no stipulation. He barely expressed his own feelings and views, and what he believed to be the views of others upon the subject. Page 617. Mr. Seward said the Northern people were weary of the war. They desired peace and a restoration of harmony, and, he believed, would be willing to pay, as an indemnity for the slaves, what would be required to continue the war, but stated no amount (page 6
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
oat, 221. Rich Mountain campaign in 1861, 38. Rockbridge county, Roster of Company C, 1st Virginia cavalry, from, 377. Rodes, General R E., killed, 5 Ropes, John Codman, historian, 83. Rosser, General T. L., 283. Sailor's Creek, Battle of, 324. Sanders, Palmer, killed, 141. Scott, Colonel W. C., 44. Secession, Right of, 61, 114; advocated by Massachusetts, 65; by the N. Y. Tribune, 67; cause of, 81. Seddon, James A., 317. Sedgwick, General, John, killed, 37. Seward, W. H., 375. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 49, 200. Sheridan, General P. H., 173, 314. Slavery, Virginia did not fight for, 76; pro-tested against continuation of, 77; the emancipation proclamation, 64. Slave trade, Debate on the, in 1858, 99. Smith, Mrs. F. H., 184, 259 South, Vindication of the, 60; cause of the, 119. Southern Historical Society-Its history, 344. Stanton, E. M., 369. Star Spangled Banner, 120. Stephens, Alex. H., 375. Steuart, R. D., 176. Stewart, Colonel W. H.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Personal reminiscences of the last days of Lee and his Paladins. (search)
and honor and keep and defend their memories! Away with the apologetic whine for the part we took in the war between the States, and the maudlin confession that we fought for what we thought was right! We fought for what we knew was right. The issue of battle never yet established a principle, it can only determine a policy. We contended for the principle of State Sovereignty, as written in the Constitution of our fathers, for the rights of the State and for the liberty of the citizen. Mr. Seward tinkled his little bell at Washington and notified the world that the laws were silent, and Mr. Greely declared that the Constitution was a league with hell and a covenant with the devil. Congress ordained that the safety of the nation demanded such construction, and the sword established the new Policy of Central Power. We yielded, not convinced, but conquered—and only after such contest, that the world looked and wondered how six millions of people could keep at bay for four long years
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of the history Committee of the Grand Camp C. V., Department of Virginia. (search)
issolution of the Union. And the votes of Messrs. Seward, Chase and Hale were recorded in favor of e treachery and duplicity of Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward, practiced on the Commissioners sent to Washres—one in front and the other in the rear. Seward's treachery and duplicity. I wish I had theracticed on the Confederate Commissioners by Mr. Seward, with, as he says, the knowledge of Mr. Lincashington, as they stated in their letter to Mr. Seward to treat with him, with a view to a speedy anecessary. I can only state that although Mr. Seward refused to treat with the Commissioners direshowed. Judge Campbell wrote two letters to Mr. Seward, setting out all the details of the deceptioause there was none that could be given. And Mr. Seward's own memorandum, made by him at the time, s taking ground for secession, Started by Mr. Seward The New York Express said, on April 15th, The Irrepressible conflict started by Mr. Seward, and endorsed by the Republican party, has a[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
dge us at once in the family of nations. As to the North, the 4th of March will determine its policy. February 20.—The exciting question now is, Who will constitute the cabinet? It is understood that Yancey is to be Attorney-General, Captain Bragg, Secretary of War, and Toombs, Secretary of the Treasury. The State portfolio was offered to Barnwell and declined by him—so says Keitt. From five to twenty letters come to me every day, begging for office. Gwynn, of California, writes that Seward told him there would be no war. February 22.—President Davis dines at our table every day. He is chatty and tries to be agreeable. He is not great in any sense of the term. The power of will he has, made him all he is. February 26.—An act was passed this morning, giving to each of the commissioners to Europe $12,000 per annum. Yancey and Slidell are both mentioned. Henry R. Jackson is also spoken of, but Mr. Davis acts for himself and receives no advice, except from those who pre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
Rebel, was the Confederate soldier a, 247. Resolutions of 1798, 162 Richardson, Sergeant and Thos. E., 217. Richardson, Captain V. V. 1. Riddick, Captain, captured, 31. Rodgers, Judge Robert L, 222, 316. Rogers, Major, Arthur Lee, 89. Rogers, Colonel George T., 211. Rosser's Laurel Brigade, 101. Ruff, Lieutenant-Colonel, 300. Sage, B. J., 157, 169. Scott, Colonel W. C 259. Secession, pioneer of, 81; right of 169. Seven Days Battle, how begun, 90. Seward, W. H., duplicity of, 188. Shaw, General Abbott D., 309 Sheridan's charge at Appomattox, 44; vandalism, 98. Shoes, Cowhide Moccasins for, 8. Slaves, Emancipation of, 197. Smith, General Francis H. 14. Smith, D. D., Rev. James P., 276. Spotsylvania Courthouse, Battle of, 2. South against the North, Case of the, 156. Southern Women, their glorious devotion, 377. Stamp Act of 1765, Declaration of rights under, 157. Starke, General, Wm. N. 3. Stephens, Alex. H. 18
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9