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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come together. The Admirall put forth a flag of counsel, in which was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the East, the winde at Northeast by East. On Sunday the 27. towards Evening wee tooke our leave of the Admirall and the whol
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590. (search)
willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come together. The Admirall put forth a flag of counsel, in which was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the East, the winde at Northeast by East. On Sunday the 27. towards Evening wee tooke our leave of the Admirall and the whol
willingly attended on them: who at this time with 10. other ships stood for Faial . But the Generall with the rest of the Fleete were separated from us, making two fleetes, for the surer meeting with the Spanish fleete. On Wednesday the 23. we saw Gratiosa, where the Admiral and the rest of the Queens fleete were come together. The Admirall put forth a flag of counsel, in which was determined that the whole fleete should go for the mayne, and spred themselves on the coasts of Spaine and Portugal , so farre as conveniently they might, for the surer meeting of the Spanish fleete in those parts. The 26. we came to Faial , where the Admiral with some other of the fleete ankred, othersome plyed up and downe betweene that and the Pico untill midnight, at which time the Antony shot off a piece and weyed, shewing his light: after whom the whole fleete stood to the East, the winde at Northeast by East. On Sunday the 27. towards Evening wee tooke our leave of the Admirall and the whol
part of Virginia extendeth nothing so far westward as is put downe in the Maps of those parts. Moreover it is not to be denied, but that one hundred men will do more now among the naked and unarmed people in Virginia , then one thousand were able then to do in Ireland against that armed and warlike nation in those dales. I say further, that these two yeres last experience hath plainly shewed, that we may spare 10000. able men without any misse. And these are as many as the kingdome of Portugal had ever in all their garrisons of the Acores , Madera, Arguin, Cape verde, Guinea, Brasill, Mozambique , Melinde, Zocotora, Ormus, Diu, Goa, Malaca , the Malucos, and Macao upon the coast of China . Yea this I say by the confession of singuler expert men of their own nation (whose names I suppresse for certaine causes) which have bene personally in the East Indies, & have assured me that their kings had never above ten thousand natural borne Portugals (their slaves excepted) out of their
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An Epistle Dedicatorie to sir Walter Ralegh, prefixed by master Richard Hakluyt before the history of Florida , which he translated out of French 1587 (search)
part of Virginia extendeth nothing so far westward as is put downe in the Maps of those parts. Moreover it is not to be denied, but that one hundred men will do more now among the naked and unarmed people in Virginia , then one thousand were able then to do in Ireland against that armed and warlike nation in those dales. I say further, that these two yeres last experience hath plainly shewed, that we may spare 10000. able men without any misse. And these are as many as the kingdome of Portugal had ever in all their garrisons of the Acores , Madera, Arguin, Cape verde, Guinea, Brasill, Mozambique , Melinde, Zocotora, Ormus, Diu, Goa, Malaca , the Malucos, and Macao upon the coast of China . Yea this I say by the confession of singuler expert men of their own nation (whose names I suppresse for certaine causes) which have bene personally in the East Indies, & have assured me that their kings had never above ten thousand natural borne Portugals (their slaves excepted) out of their
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
shoare, and so presently got him to the further side of the yland, where hee found a little Carvel ready to depart for Portugal , in the which he came to Lisbone, and passed into France, and so into England , where hee ended his life in the Citie otherefore it was commanded to be no more entreated of, and all remained unthought upon, had it not bene for a villanous Portugal that was in the company, who said, Basta ser Ingles para saber todo esto y mas: who the next day, without imparting aninding his Vice-admirall, he anchored, tooke in fresh water, and set saile for Cape Blank, where in the way wee tooke a Portugal caravel, laden with fish called Mullets : from thence we sailed to cape Verde. In our course thither we met a Frenchman of Rochel called captaine Bland, who had taken a Portugal caravel, whom our vice admiral chased and tooke. Captaine Drake, now Sir Francis Drake was made master & captaine of the Caravel, and so we kept our way till we came to Cape Verde, and ther
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Robert Tomson Marchant, into Nova Hispania in the yeere 1555. with divers observations concerning the state of the Countrey: And certaine accidents touching himselfe. (search)
he said port to an ancker, about midnight he found the meanes to get him naked out of the ship into the sea, & swam naked a shoare, and so presently got him to the further side of the yland, where hee found a little Carvel ready to depart for Portugal , in the which he came to Lisbone, and passed into France, and so into England , where hee ended his life in the Citie of London. And I for my part kept still aboord the ship, and came into Spaine, and was delivered to the Inquisitors of the Holthe Scriptures your selfe, and you shall so finde it. The talke was perceived to be prejudiciall to the Romish doctrine, and therefore it was commanded to be no more entreated of, and all remained unthought upon, had it not bene for a villanous Portugal that was in the company, who said, Basta ser Ingles para saber todo esto y mas: who the next day, without imparting any thing to any body, went to the Bishop of Mexico, and his Provisor, and said, that in a place where he had bene the day befo
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The travailes of Job Hortop, which Sir John Hawkins set on land within the Bay of Mexico, after his departure from the Haven of S. John de Ullua in Nueva Espanna, the 8. of October 1568. (search)
ur Generall heard that his Vice-admirall with the Swallow, and the William and John were at the Iland called Gomera , where finding his Vice-admirall, he anchored, tooke in fresh water, and set saile for Cape Blank, where in the way wee tooke a Portugal caravel, laden with fish called Mullets : from thence we sailed to cape Verde. In our course thither we met a Frenchman of Rochel called captaine Bland, who had taken a Portugal caravel, whom our vice admiral chased and tooke. Captaine Drake, Portugal caravel, whom our vice admiral chased and tooke. Captaine Drake, now Sir Francis Drake was made master & captaine of the Caravel, and so we kept our way till we came to Cape Verde, and there we anchored, tooke our boates, & set souldiers on shore. Our Generall was the first that leapt on land, & with him Captaine Dudley: there we tooke certaine Negroes, but not without damage to our selves. For our Generall, Captaine Dudley, & 8. other of our company were hurt with poysoned arrowes: about nine dayes after, the 8. that were wounded died. Our general was tau
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
m. There they sitte to examine matters of theft, which if a man be taken with, to steale but a Portugal cloth from another, hee is sold to the Portugals for a slave. They consult also, and take ordea mischiefe pretended toward them, as then was in deede. Which the next day we understood of a Portugal that came downe to us, who had trafficked with the Negros, by whom hee understood, that the ki because the Spaniards stood in some feare of the Frenchman of war, supposing our ship to be a Portugal , and that we were his prize: neverthelesse hee certified them to the contrary. And in staying ope was to meete my lost ship, and withall to renue my victuals upon the Canthers, which are Portugal fishermen: but the Canthers had bene so frighted by Frenchmen, as I could get none. Riding undh to the Northward of the yle of Madera, and is inhabited by old souldiers, which the kings of Portugal were wont to reward for their former olde services, by placing of them there. This yland is ri
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage made by M. John Hawkins Esquire, and afterward knight, Captaine of the Jesus of Lubek, one of her Majesties shippes, and Generall of the Salomon, and other two barkes going in his companie, to the coast of Guinea, and the Indies of Nova Hispania, begun in An. Dom. 1564. (search)
aine sitteth in the midst, and the Elders upon the floore by him: (for they give reverence to their Elders) and the common sorte sitte round about them. There they sitte to examine matters of theft, which if a man be taken with, to steale but a Portugal cloth from another, hee is sold to the Portugals for a slave. They consult also, and take order what time they shall goe to warres: and as it is certainely reported by the Portugals, they take order in gathering of the fruites in the season of y had bene a great companie, and sought to have taken them at more advantage, as God would, departed to their ships, not thinking there had bene such a mischiefe pretended toward them, as then was in deede. Which the next day we understood of a Portugal that came downe to us, who had trafficked with the Negros, by whom hee understood, that the king of Sierra Leona had made all the power hee could, to take some of us, partly for the desire he had to see what kinde of people we were, that had sp
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