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he condemned the fugitive to the flames. When he was fastened to the stake, a Franciscan friar, laboring to convert him, promised him immediate admittance to the joys of heaven if he would embrace the Christian faith, and threatened him with eternal torment if he should continue in his unbelief. The cacique asked whether there were any Spaniards in that region of bliss, and being answered in the affirmative, replied, I will not go to a place where I may meet one of that accursed race. De Soto was made captain-general of Cuba in 1537, and from that island he sailed to make a conquest of Florida. From it Cordova also sailed, and Grijalva, when they went and discovered Mexico; and from it Velasquez sent Cortez to make a conquest of the empire of Montezuma. From the advent of the Spaniards in 1511 the natives began to suffer, and they were persecuted steadily till 1898. During its early history the island changed hands several times, the Dutch once owning it for a short time and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Soto, Fernando, 1496- (search)
ting the two ocean When Pizarro went to Peru, De Soto a companied him, and was his chief lieutenantr in the precious metals than Mexico or Peru, De Soto offered to conquer it at his own expense. Peclose of May the fleet entered Cuban waters. De Soto occupied a whole year preparing for the exped natives kindly and winning their friendship, De Soto unwisely sent armed men to capture some of th fiercely hostile. With cavaliers clad in De Soto discovering the Mississippi River. steel andon neck-collars, and chains for the captives, De Soto began his march in June, 1539. He was accomptter enemy of the perfidious white people. De Soto crossed the beautiful country of the Cherokee log. When the Indian chief asked Moscoso for De Soto, that leader replied, He has ascended to heaved remnant of the expedition, The burial of De Soto. wandered another year in the region west outy of the dusky Mobilian girls. The news of De Soto's death cast a gloom over Havana, and poor Do[7 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
Florida, The twenty-seventh State admitted into the Union; received its name from its discoverer in 1512 (see Ponce De Leon). It was visited by Vasquez, another Spaniard, in 1520. It is believed by some that Verrazani saw its coasts in 1524; and the same year a Spaniard named De Geray visited it. Its conquest was undertaken by Narvaez, in 1528, and by De Soto in 1539. Panfilo Narvaez; Cabeza De Vaca (q. v.), with several hundred young men from rich and noble families of Spain landed at Tampa Bay, State seal of Florida. April 14, 1528, taking possession of the country for the King of Spain. In August they had reached St. Mark's at Appopodree Bay, but the ships they expected had not yet arrived. They made boats by September 2, on which they embarked and sailed along shore to the Mississippi. All the company excepting Cabeza de Vaca and three others perished. In 1549, Louis Cancella endeavored to establish a mission in Florida but was driven away by the Indians, who killed most
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
e tradition of which he had learned among the natives of the West Indies. He discovered the low-lying coasts of Florida, and explored its interior. Instead of the fountain of youth, he found his grave among its everglades. A few years later De Soto, who had accompanied Pizarro in the conquest of Peru, landed in Florida with a gallant array of knights and nobles, and commenced his explorations through the western wilderness. In 1541 he reached the banks of the Mississippi River, and, cross stream to the westward, and on the 16th of June reached the Mississippi near the spot where now stands the city of Prairie du Chien. To-morrow will be the 200th anniversary of that discovery. One hundred and thirty-two years before that time De Soto had seen the same river more than 1,000 miles below; but during that interval it is not known that any white man had looked upon its waters. Turning southward, these brave priests descended the great river, amid the awful solitudes. The stor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jones, Charles Colcock 1804-1863 (search)
Jones, Charles Colcock 1804-1863 Clergyman; born in Liberty county, Ga., Dec. 20, 1804; received his theological training at Andover and Princeton Theological Seminaries; was ordained in the Presbyterian Church, and became active in the work of educating the negro race. His publications include Religious instruction for negroes in the Southern States; Suggestions on the instruction of negroes in the South; and a History of the Church of God. He died in Liberty county, Ga., March 16, 1863. Lawyer; born in Savannah, Ga., Oct. 28, 1831; graduated at Princeton in 1852; admitted to the bar of Georgia in 1856; during the Civil War he served as colonel of artillery. Among his historical works are Monumental remains of Georgia; Historical sketch of the Chatham artillery; Life of Gen. Henry Lee; Commodore Josiah Tatnall; Jean Pierre Purry; Richard Henry Wilde; Siege of Savannah in 1779; De Soto and his March through Georgia, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maubila, battle of (search)
n stature, and was called the Black Warrior. De Soto had led his marauders through the beautiful Clabama to the Mississippi River. He received De Soto with haughty courtesy. When a pack-horse wasas requested to mount and ride by the side of De Soto, it was evident to him that he was really a p and moved on in the direction of the sea. De Soto discovered signs which made him uneasy. Tusceparing for their honorable reception there. De Soto did not believe him, and took measures againssted not to be held as a hostage any longer. De Soto hesitated, when the cacique, with proud and ho fall upon the Spaniards. A greater part of De Soto's army was lagging behind at that perilous mo and many wounded in that first encounter. De Soto himself was wounded, but he fought on despera and their blood flowed as freely. At length De Soto, at the head of his cavalry, made a furious cthat 11,000 native Alabamians had fallen, and De Soto lost eighty-two of his men, some of them the [4 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi, (search)
Mississippi, The first Europeans who traversed this region were De Soto and his companions. They made no settlements. La Salle discovered the river in 1682, and took formal possession of the country it watered in the name of his King. In 1716 the French erected a fort on the site of Natchez. The colonies planted there grew slowly until New Orleans was founded, when many settlers were attracted to the Mississippi River; but hostile Indians suppressed rapid growth, and it was not until after the creation of the Territory of Mississippi, April 7, 1798, that the population became numerous. The boundaries of the Territory at first included all of Alabama north of the 31st parallel. In 1817 Mississippi was admitted into the Union as a State. A new constitution was adopted in 1832. In November, 1860, the legislature, in extraordinary session, provided for an election of delegates to a convention to be held on Jan. 7, 1861, to consider the subject of secession. That convention p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mississippi River. (search)
Mississippi River. Indian name Miche-sepe, meaning Great water, or Father of waters ; was first discovered by Europeans with De Soto, in June, 1541, not far from the site of Helena, Ark., it is supposed. De Soto died on its banks. A London physician named Coxe purchased the old patent for Carolina granted to Sir Robert Heath (see State of North Carolina) in 1630, and put forward pretensions to the mouth of the Mississippi, which two armed English vessels were sent to explore. BienvilleDe Soto died on its banks. A London physician named Coxe purchased the old patent for Carolina granted to Sir Robert Heath (see State of North Carolina) in 1630, and put forward pretensions to the mouth of the Mississippi, which two armed English vessels were sent to explore. Bienville, exploring the Mississippi at a point some 50 miles from its mouth, unexpectedly encountered one of Coxe's vessels coming up. Assured that this was not the Mississippi, but a dependency of Canada, already occupied by the French, the English commander turned about and left the river; and that point has ever since been known as the English Turn. In 1673 Joliet and Marquette descended the river to a point within three days journey of its mouth. Father Hennepin explored it from the mouth of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ortiz, Juan (search)
Ortiz, Juan Soon after De Soto entered Florida he was met by a Spaniard who was a captive among the Indians. He had been captured when on the expedition with Narvaez, and preparations had been made to sacrifice him. He was bound hand and foot and laid upon a scaffold, under which a fire was kindled to roast him alive. The flm to the camp of the chief who had defeated Ucita, knowing that he would protect the Christian. When, years afterwards, he was with some hostile Indians fighting De Soto, and a horseman was about to slay him, he cried out, Don't kill me, I am a Christian; nor these people, they are my friends. The astonished Castilians stayed theld protect the Christian. When, years afterwards, he was with some hostile Indians fighting De Soto, and a horseman was about to slay him, he cried out, Don't kill me, I am a Christian; nor these people, they are my friends. The astonished Castilians stayed their firing, and Ortiz became of great use to De Soto as an interpreter.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Powell, William Henry 1823-1879 (search)
Powell, William Henry 1823-1879 Artist; born in New York City, Feb. 14, 1823; began the study of art early in life in his native city and later studied in Europe. His historical works include De Soto discovering the Mississippi; Perry's victory on Lake Erie; Siege of Vera Cruz; Battle of Buena Vista; Landing of the Pilgrims; Scott's entry into the City of Mexico; Washington at Valley Forge; and Christopher Columbus before the Court of Salamanca. He died in New York City, Oct. 6, 1879.
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