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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 2 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 233 results in 71 document sections:

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6, 302, 303, 310, 367, 370, 426, 427, 437. Description of skirmish at White House, Va., 128-29. Skirmish with Sheridan at Yellow Tavern, 427-28. Death, 428. Sullivan, Michael, 200. Patrick, 200. Thomas, 201. Sumner, General, 102, 105, 106, 137, 275, 286,294. Testimony on battle of Sharpsburg, Va., 286. Sumter (ship), 210, 237. Preparation for action, 206-07. Activities, 207-08. Supreme Court (U. S.) Case of John Merryman, 391-92. Surratt, John H., 417. Mary E., 417. Susquehanna (steamer), 63. Swann, Judge, 30. Swayne, General, 634. Swinton, —, 73. T Tacony (ship), 237. Taliaferro, General, 93, 164, 266, 268, 269, 272,296. Tallahassee (warship), 222, 237. Taney, —, 291. Tatnall, Commodore, Josiah, 73, 82, 169, 170,172. Taylor, General, 54, 271. Gen. Richard, 72, 91-92, 95, 202, 349, Taylor, Gen., Richard. 350, 351, 352-53, 438, 455, 456, 457, 458, 587, 590, 591-92, 598. Comment on Jackson, 94. Description of battle near Port Republic, 95-96
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
87325From Keweenaw Bay to Lake Superior. Port Arthur18997Port Arthur, Tex., to Gulf of Mexico. Santa Fe 70,00188010Waldo, Fla., to Melrose, Fla. Sault Ste. Marie 4,000,00018953Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at St. Mary's River. Schuylkill Navigation Co12,461,6001826108Mill Creek, Pa., to Philadelphia, Pa. Sturgeon Bay and Lake Michigan99,66118811 1-4Between Green Bay and Lake Michigan. St. Mary's Falls7,909,66718961 1-3Connects Lakes Superior and Huron at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Susquehanna and Tidewater4,931,345184045Columbia, Pa., to Havre de Grace, Md. Walhonding607,269184325Rochester, O., to Roscoe, O. Welland 23,796,353....26 3-4Connects Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. Chicago drainage Canal A canal intended chiefly for carrying off the sewage of Chicago, but which may be used for commercial purposes; begun in September, 1892; completed in January, 1900. The main channel is 29 miles long, extending from Chicago to Locksport on the Illinois River, into which strea
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
s put to flight near Tupelo, Miss. Battle near Clinton, Miss.— 15. Corbin and Grau hung at Sandusky for recruiting within the Union lines.— 18. Democratic convention in New York City expresses sympathy with Vallandigham.—22-23. Battle of Gum Swamp, N. C., —28. First negro regiment from the North left Boston.—June 1. Democratic convention in Philadelphia sympathized with Vallandigham.—3. Peace party meeting in New York, under the lead of Fernando Wood.—8. Departments of Monongahela and Susquehanna created.—12. Darien, Ga., destroyed by National forces. Governor Curtin, of Pennsylvania, calls out the militia and asks for troops from New York to repel threatened Confederate invasion. General Gillmore in command of the Department of the South.—14. The consuls of England and Austria dismissed from the Confederacy.—15. President Lincoln calls for 100,000 men to repel invasion.—19. Confederate invasion of Indiana.—21. Confederate cavalry defeated at Aldie Gap, Va.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Susquehanna settlers. (search)
Susquehanna settlers. The charter of James I., in 1620, to the Plymouth Company, covered the territory extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific and lying between lat. 40° and 46° N. Connecticut purchased a part of this territory of the Plymouth Company in 1631, with the boundary the same on the west and lat. 41° on the south. This sale was confirmed by Charles II. in 1662. The grant of Charles II. to Penn extended to lat. 42° N. Thus the Connecticut grant overlapped that of Pennsylvania one degree. In 1753 an association called the Susquehanna Company was formed, and, with the consent of the Connecticut Assembly, applied to the crown for leave to plant a new colony west of the Delaware. It was granted, and the company sent agents to the convention at Albany in 1754, who succeeded in obtaining from representatives of the Six Nations the cession of a tract of land on the eastern branch of the Susquehanna River—the beautiful valley of Wyoming. The proprietaries of Pennsylv<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Westminster Abbey. (search)
ited States by their readings and lectures. The bust of Coleridge—who has hitherto been uncommemorated in the abbey, and for some memorial of whose greatness Queen Emma of Hawaii asked in vain when she visited Westminster—is the work of an American artist and the gift of an American citizen; and the American poet and minister, Mr. J. R. Lowell, pronounced the oration when the bust was unveiled. Here, too, is the statue of Campbell, who found the subject of one of his longest poems On Susquehanna's side, fair Wyoming, and immortalized—though with many errors—the historic massacre. The white bust of Longfellow belongs to America alone. He did not attain—he would have been the last to claim for himself—the highest rank in the band of poets. He placed himself, and rightly, below the grand old masters, the bards sublime Whose distant footsteps echo Down the corridors of time, but no poet has ever been more universally beloved for his lyric sweetness and his white purity o
ches of Commodore Dupont, the commander of this expedition, exceeding in volume anything that Nelson or Collingwood had ever written. Plates, and diagrams showed how the approaches had been buoyed, and the order of battle was described, with minute prolixity. I cannot forbear giving to the reader, the names of the ships, that participated in this great naval victory, with their loss in killed and wounded, after an engagement that lasted four mortal hours. The ships were the Wabash, the Susquehanna, the Mohican, the Seminole, the Pawnee, the Unadilla, the Ottawa, the Pembina, the Isaac Smith, the Bienville, the Seneca, the Curlew, the Penguin, the Augusta, the R. B. Forbes, the Pocahontas, the Mercury, the Vandalia, and the Vixen—total 19. The killed were 8—not quite half a man apiece; and the seriously wounded 6! November 27th.—Morning thick, with heavy clouds and rain, clearing as the day advanced. Afternoon clear, bright weather, with a deep blue sea, and the trade-wind blow<
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
ach corps, and with orderlies to leave for orders. Prompt information to be sent into headquarters at all times. All ready to move to the attack at any moment. The Commanding General desires you to be informed that, from present information, Longstreet and Hill are at Chambersburg, partly towards Gettysburg; Ewell, at Carlisle and York; movements indicate a disposition to advance from Chambersburg to Gettysburg. General Couch telegraphs, 29th, his opinion that enemy's operations on Susquehanna are more to prevent co-operation with this army than offensive. The General believes he has relieved Harrisburg and Philadelphia, and now desires to look to his own army and assume position for offensive or defensive, as occasion requires, or rest to the troops. It is not his desire to wear the troops out by excessive fatigue and marches, and thus unfit them for the work they will be called upon to perform. Vigilance, energy and prompt response to the orders from headquarters are n
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
he bright side and hope for the best. I think we have a great deal to be thankful for, and things might be much worse. I had a visit yesterday from our old friend the Rev. Mr. Neill. He was very complimentary to me, and promised to call and see you on his return to Philadelphia. He was here as agent of the Christian Commission. Yesterday I went to see General Grant at City Point. He said he wanted an officer to go to Washington to take command of the Department of West Virginia, Susquehanna, Baltimore and Washington. That not wishing to take any one from the field, he had suggested Franklin, but they had declined to have Franklin. He then suggested my name, to which he had received no reply, but a message from the President asking him to meet him at Fortress Monroe. I made no reply to Grant, except to say I was ready to obey any order that might be given me. So far as having an independent command, which the Army of the Potomac is not, I would like this change very well;
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
each corps, and with orderlies to leave for orders. Prompt information to be sent into headquarters at all times. All ready to move to the attack at any moment. The commanding general desires you to be informed that from present information Longstreet and Hill are at Chambersburg, partly towards Gettysburg; Ewell at Carlisle and York. Movements indicate a disposition to advance from Chambersburg to Gettysburg. General Couch telegraphs, 29th, his opinion that enemy's operations on Susquehanna are more to prevent co-operation with this army than offensive. The general believes he has relieved Harrisburg and Philadelphia, and now desires to look to his own army, and assume position for offensive or defensive, as occasions require, and give rest to the troops. It is not his desire to wear the troops out by excessive fatigue and marches, and thus unfit them for the work they will be called upon to perform. Vigilance, energy, and prompt response to the orders from headquart
cast base, 1820. Birkenshaw, of Bedlington, Durham, invented the rolled rail; the iron, while hot, being passed between grooved rollers of the required pattern (i j k l). m n o p are respectively the Spanish, Marseilles, Strasburg, and Great Western (England) patterns. q, Durham and Sunderland, England. r, Berlin and Potsdam, Prussia. s, London and Blackwall, England. t, Manchester and Birmingham, England. u, Saint-Etienne to Lyon, France. v, Wilmington and Susquehanna, United States. w, Great Western (Old), England. x, London and Croydon, England, which first dispensed Railway-rails. with longitudinal sleepers and chairs. y, Morris and Prevost, England. z, Birmingham and Gloucester, England. a′, London and Birmingham, England. b′, London and Brighton, England. c′, Midland counties, England. d′, contractor's rail. e′, street-car rail. f′, locomotive street-rail. g′, continuous rail. h′, tubular rail. j′, King
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