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ign, Cold Harbor, Yellow Tavern, Reams' Station and Trevilian's. His gallant and cool leadership in these important engagements led to his promotion, August 10, 1864, to the rank of major-general. He was given command of a division composed of the cavalry brigades of Bradley T. Johnson, W. L. Jackson, Henry B. Davidson, J. D. Imboden and John McCausland, and rendered prominent and distinguished service in the Valley campaign of the army under General Early, at the battles of Winchester, Tom's Brook and other encounters. At the battle of Woodstock, October 9th, he was made a prisoner by Torbert's cavalry, but made his escape about three hours later by personally overthrowing his captor. On October 31st he was assigned to the command of the cavalry wing of the army under Early, and on March 29, 1865, was put in entire command of the Valley district of the department of Northern Virginia. After the fall of Richmond he moved his forces to Lynchburg, and when Lee surrendered sent the
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Maps, sketches, etc., Pertaining to the several volumes. (search)
t Royal, Va. 85 Gordonsville, Va. 84 Gooney Run, Va. 82 Guard Hill, Va. 82 Hupp's Hill, Va. 84, 85 Kearneysville, W. Va. 82 Lacey Spring, Va. 84 Liberty Mills, Va. 84 Milford, Va. 84 Moorefield, W. Va. 84 Mount Jackson, Va. 85 New Creek, W. Va. 54, 84 New Market, Va. 85 Newtown, Va. 84, 85 Opequon, Va. 85, 99 Opequon Bridge, W. Va. 82 Rude's Hill, Va. 81, 85 Shepherdstown, W. Va. 82, 85 Smithfield, W. Va. 82, 85 Tom's Brook, Va. 69, 82, 85, 99 Waynesborough, Va. 85 Weyer's Cave, Va. 85 Williamsport, Md. 85 Winchester, Va. 84, 85, 99 Volume XLIV. Atlanta to Savannah, Ga. 69, 70, 71, 101 Augusta, Ga. 132 Boyd's Neck, S. C. 91 Deveaux's Neck, S. C. 91 Honey Hill, S. C. 91 Macon, Ga. 135 Milledgeville, Ga. 71 Savannah, Ga. 69, 70, 90 Volume XLV. Columbia, Tenn. 105 Franklin, Tenn. 72, 73, 105, 135-B, 135-C Nashville, Tenn 72, 73 West Harp
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
use, Va., March 31, 1865 74, 2 Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1864 99, 2 Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865 68, 3 Shenandoah Valley Campaign, Aug. 7-Nov. 28, 1864 69, 1, 2 Sheridan's cavalry operations, 1864-65 74, 1 Tom's Brook, Va., Oct. 9, 1864 69, 3 Waynesborough, Va., March 2, 1865 72, 3, 7 Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 99, 1 Gilliss, John R.: Cincinnati, Ohio, Covington and Newport, Ky. 103, 2 Gillmore, Quincy A.: Cape Fear River, N.use, Va., March 31, 1865 74, 2 Fisher's Hill, Va., Sept. 22, 1864 99, 2 Five Forks, Va., April 1, 1865 68, 3 Missionary Ridge, Tenn., Nov. 25, 1863 50, 3 Shenandoah Valley Campaign, Aug. 7-Nov. 28, 1864 69, 1, 2 Tom's Brook, Va., Oct. 9, 1864 69, 3 Waynesborough, Va., March 2, 1865 72, 3, 7 Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 99, 1 Sherman, William T.: Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864 45, 3; 90, 3 Atlanta to Savannah, Ga. 101, 21 Augusta, Ga.
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
4, 1 Rude's Hill, Va., Nov. 22, 1864 81, 5 Shepherdstown, W. Va., Aug. 25, 1864 82, 5 Sketches 84, 22-36; 85, 6-85, 40 Smithfield Crossing, W. Va., Aug. 29, 1864 82, 7 Theater of operations 69, 1, 69, 2 Tom's Brook, Va., Oct. 9, 1864 69, 3 Welch's (or Flowing) Spring, W. Va., Aug. 21, 1864 82, 6 Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864 69, 2; 99, 1 Operations in May 15-June 17, 1862— Army of the Valley District, routes and positions 85, 1 o Creek, Miss. 63, 3 Tobesofkee Creek, Ga. 101, 21 Todd's Tavern, Va. 41, 1; 45, 1; 55, 3; 74, 1; 81, 1; 94, 7; 96, 3; 100, 1; 117, 1 Position 2d Corps, May 8, 1864 55, 3 Tompkinsville, Ky. 118, 1; 135-A; 150, E8 Tom's Brook, Va. 69, 3; 74, 1; 82, 11; 85, 34; 100, 1; 137, A4 Engagement, Oct. 9, 1864 69, 3 Tortugas Islands, Fla. 171 Totopotomoy Creek, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 19, 1; 20, 1; 21, 9; 22, 1; 55, 5; 63, 8; 74, 1; 81, 3; 83, 3; 92, 1; 96, 6; 1
e to the eastern slope of the Alleghanies, with directions to burn all forage and drive off all stock, as they moved to the rear. This was in compliance with Grant's orders to leave nothing for the subsistence of an army on any ground abandoned to the enemy. The most positive orders were given, however, not to burn dwellings. Early followed at a respectful distance, but on the 8th, his cavalry under Rosser, came up with Sheridan near Woodstock, and harassed Custer's division as far as Tom's Brook, three or four miles south of Fisher's Hill. That night Torbert, in command of the national horse, was ordered to engage the rebel cavalry at daybreak, and notified that the infantry would halt until after the defeat of the enemy. At an early hour on the 9th, the heads of the opposing columns came in contact, and after a short but severe engagement, the rebels were completely routed, losing eleven guns, together with caissons, battery forges, Headquarters' wagons, and everything else
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
brigade. General Fitz Lee having been seriously wounded at the battle of Winchester, 19th September, I had command of Wickham's brigade from that time, except at the battle of Cedar Creek, when I was absent on sick leave. At General Rosser's Tom's Brook cavalry disaster, where we lost nearly everything on wheels, my trunk and desk containing all the data I had collected fell into the hands of the enemy. Wickham did not call for a report while with us in the Valley and I did not make one. oths and tent-flies—in short, all that we wanted, and our transportation were all branded U. S., together with the mules and harness. Our cavalry battery, caissons, battery forges, &c., all had the U. S. brand until Rosser's great disaster at Tom's Brook 9th October, 1864. Reconnoisance in force 19th August, 1864. Wickham's brigade of Fitz. Lee's division, Anderson's corps, was stationed to the right of Winchester, near Abram's creek. Its pickets extended along the line of the Opequon c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
rd Virginia, and Brethead's battery of horse artillery. We fell back up the Luray Valley, skirmishing all the way. Some several weak charges were attempted by the enemy, but without any real advantages to them or loss to us. Wickham moved back to Gorny Run and formed his line, and there remained for the day and night. There were the cavalry in poor condition which Sheridan had so guilelessly said he could not get at. This trouble seemed to have followed him until our great disaster at Tom's Brook, where by Rosser's rashness we were entrapped, and lost more in that one fight than we had ever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Front Royal pike this morning and drove them from Front Royal up the Luray Valley for a distance of six miles. I directed two brigades of the First
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
rd Virginia, and Brethead's battery of horse artillery. We fell back up the Luray Valley, skirmishing all the way. Some several weak charges were attempted by the enemy, but without any real advantages to them or loss to us. Wickham moved back to Gorny Run and formed his line, and there remained for the day and night. There were the cavalry in poor condition which Sheridan had so guilelessly said he could not get at. This trouble seemed to have followed him until our great disaster at Tom's Brook, where by Rosser's rashness we were entrapped, and lost more in that one fight than we had ever done before, in all of our fights together. (I refer to material, not men.) On page 176, Pond's book, we find the following: The night of the 21st he sent this dispatch (Sheridan to Grant). Gen. Wilson's cavalry division charged the enemy at Front Royal pike this morning and drove them from Front Royal up the Luray Valley for a distance of six miles. I directed two brigades of the First
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8 (search)
e 9th they encountered the whole cavalry force at Tom's Brook, in rear of Fisher's Hill, and both of their commsmall brigade of the enemy. To make the fight at Tom's Brook was against all the rules of discretion and judgmery severe fight, and had forced the enemy across Tom's Brook, in sight of their infanty camps; our loss had be pickets at Edinburg. In our fight and race at Tom's Brook, I had bruised an ugly boil, which had now turnedrasburg, while Merrit, covering the rear, reached Tom's Brook, which crosses the Valley three miles south of thine connected from the Valley pike to the road at Tom's Brook, while our line could not reach and hold one-quarttle this new Cavalry General. The engagement at Tom's Brook was a fine offset to the check received by Torberlight.] The moral effect of Sheridan's victory at Tom's Brook was very great The Confederate cavalry in the She mortification and suffering, and the disaster of Tom's Brook crushed all hope of efficiency with the Confedera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate dead in Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester, Va. Memorial services, June 6, 1894. (search)
like, he fought as he fled, and though often threatened by overwhelming foes, he felt secure from surprise, for the rattle of Ashby's small arms, the sound of Chew's guns, told him always exactly the whereabouts of the Federal advances. At Tom's Brook, though two guns were lost, never was witnessed greater valor. The lines of blue almost surrounded it, sharpshooters poured volleys into its ranks; squadron after squadron of blue, on flank and rear, dashed at it, and not until the gray was lde was formed, composed as follows: Major S. J. C. Moore, of Berryville, chief marshal; Friendship Fire Company, headed by the Friendship Military Band, 127 men; Sarah Zane Fire Company, 80 men, headed by C. V. Camp's Drum Corps; Woodstock and Tom's Brook Military Companies, of the Second Virginia Regiment; members of camps, Confederate Veterans, headed the Chapel Grove Band. The procession marched to the cemetery, and while several dirges were played by the bands the graves were decorated.
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