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Savage, James, 16. Savannah, Ga., 141,150, 208, 239, 240, 253, 261, 263, 286, 287, 289. Savannah Republican, 252. Savannah River, 233, 286. Sawyer, Mr., 312. Saxton, Rufus, 1, 37, 105, 208, 221, 228, 229. Saxton, Rufus, letter to E. N. Hallowell, 229. Scammon, E. P., 195, 228, 233. Schimmelfennig, A., 157, 189, 195, 199, 201, 206, 211, 221, 274, 275, 283. Schmitt, Michael, 146. Schouler, William, 33. Schwabe, Leo B., 221. Scott, Charles, 304. Scudder, Marshall S., 15. Seabrook Island, S. C., 199. Sea Voyages, 35, 36, 39, 40, 51, 148, 151, 184, 234, 286, 288, 309, 317. Secessionville, S. C., 53, 54, 56, 57, 189, 192, 197, 199, 211. Secretary of War, 2, 31, 97, 190, 191, 220. Sentinel, steamer, 39, 40, 41, 44. Serrell, E. W., 108, 109. Seven Mile Bridge, S. C., 291. Severance, Mrs. C. M., 23. Seymour, Battery, 139. Seymour, Truman, 74, 86, 88, 133, 150, 152, 153, 155, 156, 157, 158, 160, 162,163, 164, 167, 169, 170, 172, 174, 175, 177, 181, 182, 183, 195
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter army life and camp drill (search)
Rogers, Dr. Minor, his assistant, and Lieutenant Bingham, the quartermaster, two as true, pure-hearted, and manly young fellows as the world can show. Then there is Captain Rogers and the adjutant and his wife; he always steady, unassuming, and equal to all he undertakes, and she taking life always on the sunny and sensible side. With two or three more women as bright and pleasant our little household would be quite a model. . . . Then I call for Rinaldo and away to visit the pickets. At Seabrook we keep a nice little sailboat which I brought from Jacksonville. Sometimes I take that and cross to some island which we do not picket and which we and the enemy both approach cautiously, they especially, for they have never shown daring except in hopes to find us napping. April 23 I hope you have not been troubled by the attack on me by Conservator in the Evening post. As to the putting on shore of furniture, etc., at Jacksonville, I certainly did it; for it was a choice between
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1857. (search)
of operations by which he captured Fort Wagner and silenced Fort Sumter. Folly Island was first seized, and then a landing effected on Morris Island, at the northern extremity of which was Fort Wagner. Some of Lieutenant Perkins's letters written at this time, besides giving an excellent picture of what was going on, show unconsciously how bravely he was bearing up against debility and sickness, and how faithfully he was doing his duty, in spite of all depressing influences. Seabrook Island, South Carolina, July 10, 1863. They are banging away furiously on Folly Island. About five o'clock this morning the fire commenced, and it has been very heavy down to this time, seven A. M. Every regiment in the department, but two or three, is up there on Folly. Six companies only of the Twenty-fourth have gone. Four of us, unlucky ones, are left here in garrison by order of General Gillmore. He said they should be of the Twenty-fourth, and the Colonel, or General Stevenson, said tha
out, Feb. 10, 1866. Osborn, Francis Augustus. Born at Danvers, Mass., Sept. 22, 1833. Captain, 4th Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Apr. 20, 1861. Lieut. Colonel, 24th Mass. Infantry, Aug. 31, 1861; mustered, Oct. 1, 1861. Joined Burnside's expedition at Annapolis, Md., Dec., 1861; engaged in battles of Roanoke Island, New Berne, Tranter's Creek and various expeditions in North Carolina. Colonel, Dec. 28, 1862. Ordered to Hilton Head, S. C., Jan., 1863, thence to Seabrook Island and Edisto Inlet; at James Island, July, 1863; at Fort Wagner and on siege and trench duties; at St. Augustine and Jacksonville, Fla., until Apr, 1864; at Gloucester City, Va. With the Army of the James. Mustered out, Nov. 14, 1864. Brevet Brig. General, U. S. Volunteers, Mar. 13, 1865. Paine, Charles Jackson. Born at Boston, Mass., Aug. 26, 1833. Captain, 22d Mass. Infantry, Oct. 1, 1861. Major, Eastern Bay State Regiment, Jan. 14, 1862 (S. O. 11, Adj. General's orders, U. S.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
ase of swift torpedo boats from English builders. On November 15th, Maj. John Jenkins, Third South Carolina cavalry, reported that the enemy had reoccupied Seabrook island (John's island) in large force. On the following day there was a considerable action between the Federal monitors and the Sullivan's island batteries, Capt. their absence. Gen. Henry A. Wise, in command of the Sixth district, reported that the enemy landed in force on Kiowah island, the night of the 8th, crossed Seabrook island, at the Haulover to John's island, driving in the pickets of the advanced post held by Maj. John Jenkins, with part of the Sixth South Carolina cavalry. Jenk 1st, he sailed from Hilton Head with a force of 5,000 infantry, 100 cavalry and two sections of artillery. Two brigades, under General Hatch, were landed on Seabrook island with orders to push to the north end, seize the ferry, cross over and destroy the railroad. Another brigade was landed at White Point under General Birney,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
a private was detailed to the office of Surg.-Gen. R. W. Gibbes, with headquarters at Charleston. Six months later he entered the Washington artillery, Capt. George H. Walters commanding, and was mustered into the Confederate service with this command, thereafter known as Walters' light battery. He was present at the bombardment of Fort Sumter in 1861, and with the artillery he participated in a considerable number of engagements in North and South Carolina, including the fights at Seabrook's Island causeway, June 17, 1863, Waterloo, John's island, July 9, 10, 11, 1864; with gunboats on the Dawhoo river; with the Pawnee, Little Britain island, in February, 1865, and the battles of Averasboro and McNeill's Ferry, N. C., in March, 1865. He was also detailed on various occasions, in the office of Captain Maloney, adjutant-general of Hagood's brigade, as secretary of the brigade medical board, in the office of Adjutant-General Stringfellow, when the latter was connected with the depa
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
The Seneca and the Ellen had in the meantime entered Whale Branch, and after ascending two miles, Captain Elliott, of the Seventy-ninth Highlanders, came on board the Seneca from Port Royal Island, and one mile higher up pointed out an earthwork at Long Point, on Barnwell's Island, at a ten-second fuse range. The channel being quite narrow the vessels anchored and shelled the work, without receiving a reply. Captain Elliott embarked a force of 300 men in scows from a creek one mile below Seabrook, and landed on the site of the earthwork. Signals from him indicated the position of the enemy, and as requested the vessels opened fire until signal was made to discontinue. A platform for one heavy gun was in place; the incomplete earthwork was designed for a number of guns. Captain Elliott destroyed the magazine and wood-work by fire, as well as some wood that had served as a concealment. At 2.30 Commander Rodgers, from the Ottawa at Port Royal Ferry, signalled the Seneca and Ellen
move when the enemy, in anticipation, doubtless, of my attempt to reinforce Finegan, made a strong demonstration on St. John's island. Though assured of the purpose of this movement it assumed, however, so serious a form as to compel me to divert temporarily General Colquitt and three and a half regiments of his brigade to reinforce General Wise, then confronted by at least two brigades of the enemy, about 4,500 strong, pushed forward in advance of the bridge-way between St. John's and Seabrook islands, and in addition several regiments of infantry were detached from Sullivan's and James islands to be in readiness for the development of the enemy's purposes. On the night of the 11th of February I ordered all our batteries bearing on Morris island to open a heavy simultaneous fire on that position, as if a cover for an assault, and with the hope of forcing the enemy to withdraw from St. John's island to the protection of his own works. This strategem seemed to have produced the des
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
o our brigade was assigned the duty of guarding the entire district lying between the Ashley and the Edisto, with the exception of James' island. On the Atlantic front it extended from the Stono to the Edisto, including Johns' island, Kiahwah, Seabrooks, Jehosse, Kings, and Slau's islands, and the Wadmalaw. At first, our headquarters were at Wappoo, and then farther South at Adams' Run, and extended from Willtown on the Edisto, to the Church Flats on the Stono, posting Willtown, the Toogadoo,proved in the sequel to be true, and enabled General Beauregard to forward reinforcements to General Finnegan. Just before these reinforcements were to depart for Florida, General Alex. Schimmelfinnig with 6,000 men crossed over the bars to Seabrook Island, and surprising the picket at the Haulover from that island to the main, he advanced up the Bohickett road and nearly reached the headquarters of Major Jenkins, in command at that point, twenty-five miles from Adams Run. Major Jenkins had no
Comparative statement of Inspections of Tobacco in the City of Richmond, from 1st October, 1859, to 1st February, 1860, and from 1st October, 1860, to 1st February, 1861: 1860. Shockoe1,155 Public630 Seabrook's425 Dibrell's495 Mayo's, (no inspection.) 2,705 1861. Shockoe2,172 Public1,482 Seabrook's792 Dibrell's597 Mayo's968 6,011 2,705 Excess3,306 Wm. Y. Sheppard, Proprietor of Tobacco Exchange. Richmond Tobacco Exchange, Feb. 1, 1861. fe 2--1t Comparative statement of Inspections of Tobacco in the City of Richmond, from 1st October, 1859, to 1st February, 1860, and from 1st October, 1860, to 1st February, 1861: 1860. Shockoe1,155 Public630 Seabrook's425 Dibrell's495 Mayo's, (no inspection.) 2,705 1861. Shockoe2,172 Public1,482 Seabrook's792 Dibrell's597 Mayo's968 6,011 2,705 Excess3,306 Wm. Y. Sheppard, Proprietor of Tobacco Exchange. Richmond Tobacco Exchange, Feb. 1, 1861. fe 2--1t
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