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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Comments on the First volume of Count of Paris' civil War in America. (search)
ted States had always been very small in time of peace, and after 1855, up to the beginning of the war, consisted of only eight regiments of infantry, four regiments of artillery, and five mounted regiments, numbering about ten or eleven thousand men in all. The great bulk of that army had been employed on the Western frontier as a protection against the Indians from time immemorial, and Governor Floyd, as Secretary of War, made no change in the policy of the Government in that respect. General Twiggs, the officer alluded to as having been selected for the purpose of betraying the troops placed under him, had been on frontier duty during the greater part of his military life, and had been in command in Texas from a period dating long before secession was contemplated. The troops under him that are represented as having been withdrawn front the Federal forts and arsenals, to be scattered over Texas, consisted mainly of the Second cavalry, which had been in Texas since 1856--very short
marked distinction in the war with Mexico; indeed, had been quite as often noticed in official reports for gallantry and good conduct as any officer who served in that war. After its close he had served on the Western frontier, and in Indian warfare exhibited a like activity and daring as that shown in the greater battles with Mexico. Immediately on the secession of his native state, Mississippi, he resigned from the United States Army, and, together with his veteran commander in Texas, General Twiggs, commenced recruiting men for the anticipated war. He was among the first to leave the service of the United States, and came to offer his sword to Mississippi. In the military organization there authorized, he was appointed a brigadier general, and, when the state troops were transferred to the Confederacy, he entered its service. Gentle as he was brave, and generous, freely sharing all the dangers and privations to which his troops were subjected, he possessed, like his associate Pri
, 488, 490. Judge, 614. Thompson, —. Member of Confederate peace commission, 517. Tidball, —, 589-90. Tift, Messrs. 189. Tilghman, General, Lloyd, 21, 23, 340, 343. Tod, Gov., David, 89-90. Toombs, General, Robert, 131, 283. Trabue, General, 48. Tracy, General, 334. Trenholm, —, 585-86. Trigg, General, 360. Trimble, General, 93-94, 270, 271, 281, 284, 285, 302. Trobriand, General de, 642. Tucker, Commodore John R., 165, 563, 565. Turner, Capt. Edmund P., 199, 200. Twiggs, General, 328. Tyler, Gen. E. B., 392. U United States. Comparison with Confederate States, 158. Demand for reclamation from Great Britain, 224-25. Statements of Lord Russell, 225, 226-27. Action when a neutral power, 231. Accusations against Britain, 229, 231-32. Alabama claims, 236. Oath of allegiance made qualification of voter, 258-59. Blockade of Southern ports, 288-89. Attempts to secure cotton, 289-93. Communications to foreign cabinets concerning Confederate States, 312. <
Doc. 39.--Twiggs' treason. The following is a list of the property given up to the State of Texas by Gen. Twiggs: 1,800 mules, valued at $50 each$90,000 500 wagons, valued at $140 each70,000 950 horses, valued at $150 each142,500 500 harness, valued at $50 each25,000 Tools, wagon materials, iron, nails, horse and mule shoes250,000 Corn (at this port)7,000 Clothing150,000 Commissary stores75,000 Ordnance stores400,000   Total$1,209,500 Exclusive of public buildings to whicGen. Twiggs: 1,800 mules, valued at $50 each$90,000 500 wagons, valued at $140 each70,000 950 horses, valued at $150 each142,500 500 harness, valued at $50 each25,000 Tools, wagon materials, iron, nails, horse and mule shoes250,000 Corn (at this port)7,000 Clothing150,000 Commissary stores75,000 Ordnance stores400,000   Total$1,209,500 Exclusive of public buildings to which the Federal Government has a title. Much of the property is estimated at the original cost, its value in Texas being much greater, and worth to the State at least a million and a half of dollars.--San Antonio Herald, Feb. 23.
prague's letter. San Antonio, Texas, April 24, 1861. Dear Sir:--Since my last letter events have culminated here so rapidly it is impossible for me to narrate them in detail. To myself, the most important event is my arrest as a prisoner of war. The decided measures adopted in Washington towards the Confederate States alarmed the authorities at Montgomery, when orders were transmitted to arrest and disarm the United States troops en route out of Texas, under the agreement made by Gen. Twiggs, and to arrest the United States officers on duty in San Antonio, as prisoners of war. The sacred engagement made by Texas that the entire command serving in that State should pass out unmolested has been disregarded, and Texas, through her recently acknowledged government, has participated in this most graceless act. Fifteen officers have been arrested and marched through, the streets of San Antonia, surrounded by a guard of Texas volunteers. Most of these officers have served from fiv
are our Constitution — our Union--our Country. You and your brave compatriots, from more than twenty States, will march hand in hand to victory, as certainly as a just and beneficent God rules on earth and in Heaven. Your cause is the cause of truth, of right, of civil and religious liberty, and human history records no defeat in such a cause. I will add one word: if, in the course of events, it be your good fortune to fall in with any one or more of five men named Cobb, Floyd, Thompson, Twiggs, or Davis, do not, I pray, permit them to escape you. They are wanted to satisfy the stern demands which humanity makes on traitors more infamous than any whose names have yet been mentioned among men. Our best wishes attend you. Again I say — welcome, thrice welcome, ye gallant men of the Fourteenth! The regimental color was now brought forward, and Charles Tracy addressed the regiment as follows: Col. McQuade and Officers and Members of the Regiment: The Sons of Oneida County r
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 7: at West Point as instructor, 1857-61; the outbreak of the Civil War (search)
turing, by States, of forts poorly manned, and of arsenals which had no guards to defend them. Every new item of this sort had great interest for us, for the evidences of an approaching collision on a large scale were multiplying. The story of Twiggs's surrender of United States troops to Texas, followed by details of imprisonment and paroling, reached us in the latter part of February. Twiggs's promises to allow the troops to go North were mostly broken. Six companies of the United States Twiggs's promises to allow the troops to go North were mostly broken. Six companies of the United States Infantry, including a few officers and men of other regiments, Lieutenant Colonel Reeve commanding, were obliged to give up to a Confederate commander, Earl Van Dorn, by May 9th. The organizers of the secession movement soon succeeded in firing the Southern heart. As we men from the North and South, at our post on the Hudson, looked anxiously into each other's faces, such indeed was the situation that we knew that civil war with its unknown horrors was at hand. One morning, as officers an
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 13: General E. V. Sumner and my first reconnoissance (search)
e Mexican War and had obtained therefore the reward of two brevets. He had, however, been obliged before the war for the Union to play a part in Kansas not to his liking: for his orders had required him to disperse the free-state legislature. Still, whatever were his private sympathies or political sentiments, he did not hesitate to obey. It was then a compensative satisfaction to be sent under the new administration with which he was in accord to command the Department of California. General Twiggs's defection and dismissal gave Sumner a brigadiership. His California work was made remarkable by his rallying the Union element and frightening disunionists. Prominent secessionists he caused to be arrested; and some to be apprehended outside of California while they were en route via Panama toward the Gulf States. Such was. the war-worn, loyal Sumner who arrived in Washington the last of November, 1861. McClellan immediately assigned him to duty, expecting just then some active cam
the Alabama troops; Fort Morgan, in Mobile Bay, had been taken; Forts Jackson, St. Philip, and Pike, near New Orleans, had been captured by the Louisiana troops; the Pensacola Navy-Yard and Forts Barrancas and McRae had been taken, and the siege of Fort Pickens commenced ; the Baton Rouge Arsenal had been surrendered to the Louisiana troops; the New Orleans Mint and Custom-House had been taken ; the Little Rock Arsenal had been seized by the Arkansas troops; and on the 18th of February, Gen. Twiggs had transferred the military posts and public property in Texas to the State authorities. It is remarkable that all these captures and events had been accomplished without the sacrifice of a single life, or the effusion of one drop of blood. It was, perhaps, in view of this circumstance, that people lingered in the fancy that there would be no war. Yet the whole country was agitated with passion; the frown of war was already visible; and it needed but some Cadmus to throw the stone th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, chapter 51 (search)
s Fund? If not, her success does no more credit to woman, in the opinion of these critics, than Kit's not happening to take that particular five-pound note did to his honesty. Just wait a while, they say, and you will see some woman fail in something, never fear. One critic goes so far as to say that all high creative work still remains out of the reach of woman. Romola does not seem to such a critic to be high creative work, probably; that phrase should be reserved for men — for little Twiggs, perhaps, with his fine realistic study, The Trippings of Tom Popinjay. What a flood of light all this throws on the reasons why such very able women write under masculine names! George Sand, Currer Bell, George Eliot, are but the type of many others. They wrote in that way not because they wished to be men, but because they wished for an unbiassed judgment as artists; and in each case they got it. When it came, and in the form of triumphant success, all women were benefited by it, and
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