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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 60 BC or search for 60 BC in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Planu'des or Planu'des Maximus (search)
ading is, however, somewhat doubtful), and others by Neoptolemusof Paros (Ath. x. p 454, f.), and Euhemerus (Lactant. Instit. Div. 1.9; Cic. de Nat. Deor. 1.42). 2. The Garland of Meleager. The above compilers chiefly collected epigrams of particular classes, and with reference to their use as historical authorities. The first person who made such a collection solely for its own sake, and to preserve epigrams of all kinds, was MELEAGER, a cynic philosopher of Gadara, in Palestine, about B. C. 60. His collection contained epigrams by no less than forty-six poets, of all ages of Greek poetry, up to the most ancient lyric period. He entitled it The Garland (*Ste/fanos), with reference, of course, to the common comparison of small beautiful poems to flowers; and in the introduction to his work, he attaches the names of various flowers, shrubs, and herbs, as emblems, to the names of the several poets. The same idea is kept up in the word Anthology (a)nqologi/a), which was adopted by the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Greek Anthology (search)
ading is, however, somewhat doubtful), and others by Neoptolemusof Paros (Ath. x. p 454, f.), and Euhemerus (Lactant. Instit. Div. 1.9; Cic. de Nat. Deor. 1.42). 2. The Garland of Meleager. The above compilers chiefly collected epigrams of particular classes, and with reference to their use as historical authorities. The first person who made such a collection solely for its own sake, and to preserve epigrams of all kinds, was MELEAGER, a cynic philosopher of Gadara, in Palestine, about B. C. 60. His collection contained epigrams by no less than forty-six poets, of all ages of Greek poetry, up to the most ancient lyric period. He entitled it The Garland (*Ste/fanos), with reference, of course, to the common comparison of small beautiful poems to flowers; and in the introduction to his work, he attaches the names of various flowers, shrubs, and herbs, as emblems, to the names of the several poets. The same idea is kept up in the word Anthology (a)nqologi/a), which was adopted by the
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
s--his diligentia--his diligentia-forms an especial subject of praise with Quintilian. (Comp. in general Quint. Inst. 10.1.113, 10.2.25, 12.11.28; Senec. Control. iv. Praef. p. 441, Suas. vi. p. 50; Senec. Ep. 100; Auct. Dial. de Orat. 17, 21, 25.) Meyer has collected the titles of eleven of his orations. (Orator. Roman. Fragm. p. 491, &c.) As an historian Pollio was celebrated for his history of the civil wars in seventeen books. It commenced with the consulship of Metellus and Afranius, B. C. 60, in which year the first triumvirate was formed, and appears to have come down to the time when Augustus obtained the undisputed supremacy of the Roman world. It has been erroneously supposed by some modern writers from a passage in Plutarch (Plut. Caes. 46), that this work was written in Greek. Pollio was a contemporary of the whole period embraced in his history, and was an eye-witness of many of the important events which he describes. His work was thus one of great value, and is cited b
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Pompeius Magnus or Pompeius the Great or Cn. Pompeius (search)
ad risen into importance during his absence in the East, and over which Caesar possessed unbounded influence. The object, however, which engaged the immediate attention of Pompey was to obtain from the senate a ratification for all his acts in Asia, and an assignment of lands which he had promised to his veterans. In order to secure this object the more certainly, he had purchased the consulship for one of his creatures, L. Afranius, who accordingly was elected with Q. Metellus for the year B. C. 60. But he was cruelly disappointed; L. Afranius was a man of slender ability and little courage, and did hardly any thing to promote the views of his patron: the senate, glad of an opportunity to put an affront upon a man whom they both feared and hated, resolutely refused to sanction Pompey's measures in Asia. This was the unwisest thing the senate could have done. If they had known their real interests, they would have yielded to all Pompey's wishes, and have sought by every means to win hi
P. Scae'vius a soldier who served under Caesar in Spain in B. C. 60, when the latter governed that province after his praetorship. (D. C. 37.53.)
e treasury; but the senate always offered a strong opposition to such an investigation. When the attempt was renewed in B. C. 66 by one of the tribunes, Cicero, who was then praetor, spoke against the proposal. (Ascon. in Cornel. p. 72, ed Orelli; Cic. pro Cluent. 34, de Leg. Agr. 1.4.) Soon after this Faustus accompanied Pompey into Asia, and was the first who mounted the walls of the temple of Jerusalem in B. C. 63, for which exploit he was richly rewarded. (J. AJ 14.4.4, B. J. 1.7.4.) In B. C. 60 he exhibited the gladiatorial games which his father in his last will had enjoined upon him, and at the same time he treated the people in the most sumptuous manner. In B. C. 54 he was quaestor, having been elected augur a few years before. In B. C. 52 he received from the senate the commission to rebuild the Curia Hostilia, which had been burnt down in the tumults following the murder of Clodius, and which was henceforward to be called the Curia Cornelia, in honour of Faustus and his fathe
Trebo'nius 11. C. Trebonius, played rather a prominent part in the last days of the republic. He commenced public life as a supporter of the aristocratical party, and in his quaestorship (B. C. 60) he attempted to prevent the adoption of P. Clodius into a plebeian family, contrary to the wish of the triumvirs. (Cic. Fam. 15.21.) He changed sides, however, soon afterwards, and in his tribunate of the plebs (B. C. 55) he was the instrument of the triumvirs in proposing that Pompey should have the two Spains, Crassus Syria, and Caesar the Gauls and Illyricum for another period of five years. This proposal received the approbation of the comitia, and is known by the name of the Lex Trebonia. (D. C. 39.33; Cic. Att. 4.8. b. ยง 2.) For this service he was rewarded by being appointed one of Caesar's legates in Gaul, where he remained till the breaking out of the civil war in B. C. 49. In the course of the same year he was intrusted by Caesar with the command of the land forces engaged in the
Tusce'nius an obscure person, whom Q. Cicero compelled in B. C. 60 to disgorge some dishonest gains. (Cic. ad Q. Fr. 1.1.6, 1.2.2.)
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