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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
. F. Lynch in the capture of the Federal steamer Fanny, and his defeat of Federal forces at Chicamacomico. In April, 1862, he commanded the Confederate forces in a spirited little battle at South Mills, in which the Union loss was 127 to a Confederate loss of 28. On June 3, 1862, he was commissioned a brigadier-general and assigned to the command of the Third, Twenty-second, Forty-sixth and Forty-eighth regiments of Georgia infantry, and the Second Georgia battalion. At first they were in Huger's division, but were afterward assigned to Anderson's division of A. P. Hill's corps of the army of Northern Virginia. At Malvern hill, Wright's brigade participated in the fierce attack of Magruder upon the Union position, of which Gen. D. H. Hill wrote: I never saw anything more grandly heroic. At Second Manassas and in the battles of the Maryland campaign, Wright and his brigade continued to valorously illustrate Georgia. At Second Manassas General Wright's son, William, serving on his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Signal Corps in the Confederate States army. (search)
lowing extracts from Captain Markoe's reports will be excused by their interest: During the month (July, 1863,) my corps has been at work day and night. At Cummins Point (Battery Gregg) Lance Sergeant Edgerton and Privates Du Barry, Lance, Huger, Martin and Grimball have gallantly worked their post with untiring zeal and ability, constantly under heavy fire of the enemy's fleet and land batteries. Fortunately, I have no casualties to report, although their station has suffered from the led by a similar notice. The dispatch was: General Gilmore The senior officer will take charge of the assaulting party on Fort Sumter, the whole to be under the command of an experienced naval officer. During the attack on Sumter, Private Frank Huger was placed in charge of the fire-ball party on the parapet, numbering some thirty men, and assisted in giving the enemy a warm reception. Major Elliot, commanding the post, speaks highly of his conduct on that occasion. The enemy have be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Old South. (search)
will be admitted, without question, that Butler's South Carolina regiment and Davis' Mississippi regiment gained more reputation than the other volunteer regiments. I think it will be equally admitted that Quitman's Southern division of volunteers had the confidence of General Scott, next to his two divisions of regulars. Scott's chief engineers on that wonderful march from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico were Swift, of North Carolina, and R. E. Lee, of Virginia. His chief of ordnance was Huger, of South Carolina. The most brilliant exploit of that war was the attack of Tatnall, of Georgia, in a little gunboat, upon the castle of San Juan D'Ulloa and the land batteries at Vera Cruz. If there was anything more daring in that war, so full of great deeds, my eyes were not so fortunate as to behold it. The bold, bluff tar of that day had a gentle, loving heart, full of kindly sympathy with his own race and lineage, as shown by rowing through shot and shell to offer such assistan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
77. Hooker, Gen., Joseph, 31. Hope, Island of, 22, 25. Hopkins. Capt. Ward, 399, 401 Horton, Sergeant, 143. Houk, Capt., 8, 16. Howard, Col. John Eager, 433. Howe's History of the Presbyterian Church, 7, 10, 13. Hoyt, Geo. H., 360. Huger, 104 Huger, Frank, 105. Huger, Gen., Isaac, 10. Huguenin, Gen, 396. Huguenin, Lt., 404. Huguenin, Capt., Thos., 159, 170. Humor of Confederate soldiers 48. Humphreys, Gen.,25, 70, 378; his Campaign 1864-1864, cited, 25, 30. HumphreyHuger, Frank, 105. Huger, Gen., Isaac, 10. Huguenin, Gen, 396. Huguenin, Lt., 404. Huguenin, Capt., Thos., 159, 170. Humor of Confederate soldiers 48. Humphreys, Gen.,25, 70, 378; his Campaign 1864-1864, cited, 25, 30. Humphreys, Wm., 13. Hunt, Gen. H. J., 30. Hunter, Andrew, 359. Hunter, Gen., David, 40. Hunter, R. M. T.—Post-Bellum Mortality among Confederates, address of Col. C. C. Jones, Jr., 270, 418. Hurlbut, Col., 302, 305, 309, 317. Imboden, Gen. J D., 27. Ingersoll, Col. C. J., 325. Ingraham, Commodore, 273 Irish in Federal army, 438. Ironsides, Gunboat, 160. Irving, Sergeant J. K., 91. Island, Taylor, 178; Battery. 178; Cole, 178; James, 178. Izler, Gen. J. F., 135, 190, 395. Izler, Se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
The report of the officer in command of that post showed that its loss was due in a great measure to the supposed persistent disregard by the Secretary of his urgent requisitions for powder and other supplies. Mr. Benjamin had directed General Huger to send powder from Norfolk to the garrison at Roanoke Island, and had been informed by Huger that compliance with that order would leave Norfolk without ammunition. The report of the commanding officer at Roanoke Island led to an investigatHuger that compliance with that order would leave Norfolk without ammunition. The report of the commanding officer at Roanoke Island led to an investigation of the loss of the post by a committee of Congress, and I give you the result in the language of Mr. Benjamin: I consulted the President, he says, whether it was best for the country that I should submit to unmerited censure or reveal to a congressional committee our poverty, and my utter inability to supply the requisitions of General Wise, and thus run the risk that the fact should become known to some of the spies of the enemy, of whose activity we were well assured. It was though
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ing with it banners representing the battalion and each of the six batteries composing the battalion, to-wit: Parker's, Jordan's, Moody's, Taylor's, Rhett's and Woolfolk's. On these banners were the names of the seventeen pitched battles in which they were engaged. At the head of the column were five tattered battle-flags carried by Private S. P. Weisiger and companions, from Georgia. The battery was headed by the former commandants of the battalion, to-wit: General E. P. Alexander, Colonel Frank Huger, Major W. W. Parker, and Captain John Haskill, adjutant of the battalion. The battery following the field officers was Parker's Battery, composed of the following: Captain J. Thompson Brown, Lieutenant J. C. Parkinson, First-Sergeant Thomas L. Alfriend, and Sergeants William Cogbill, John Cogbill, Matt Condrey, Thomas W. Pemberton, Frank Turnley, D. C. Richardson, and Quartermaster-Sergeant of the battalion S. Carter Weisiger; Corporals D. C. Howard, John W. Moody, Thomas J. Todd; P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
ing cavalry corps, Army of Tennessee. 1860. Benjamin Sloan.* 1853. Born South Carolina. Appointed South Carolina. 7. Major, Assistant Adjutant-General, Huger's Division Army of Northern Virginia, in 1862. William W. M'Creery. 1857. Born Virginia. Appointed at Large. 11. Lieutenant, Confederate States Army, 18s.* 1874. Born South Carolina. Appointed South Carolina. 28. Major, 1864, commanding Gibbes's Battalion, Artillery Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Frank Huger. 1877. Born Virginia. Appointed at Large. 31. Colonel, 1865, commanding Huger's Battalion of Artillery, Artillery First Corps, Army of Northern VirginiaHuger's Battalion of Artillery, Artillery First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Edward B. D. Riley. 1880. Born Indian Territory. Appointed at Large. 34. Lieutenant-Colonel, 1864. Chief of Ordnance, Hindman's Corps, Army of Tennessee. Harold Borland. 1887. Born North Carolina. Appointed Arkansas. 41. Captain, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Brigadier-General Chalmers, 1861, Army of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
and objurgation. Old Jack certainly did not come up to the Valley. We had to lie there all day and let Longstreet and A. P. Hill fight the notable battle of Glendale, or Frazier's farm, on that memorable Monday, June 30th, without our assistance, which aid would have insured an early victory and perhaps destroyed half of Mc-Clellan's army, the leading corps having already gone on to Malvern Hill. Why the troops on the extreme right did not come to their assistance—Magruder, Holnes, and Huger—it is not for me to say. I am writing only as to my own experience. Perhaps the detour was too great, or the enemy in their front too threatening, but whatever it was, we missed it, and the result was the battle of Malvern Hill next day, Tuesday, July 1st. It is hard to write about the battle of Malvern Hill, which seems to the subordinate a perfectly useless fight. General D. H. Hill, it is said, advised against it, and it would have been well for us if his advice had been taken. But
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
Gibbs, W. H., 75. Gilmer, J. F., 46. Gorgas, J., 48. Gracie, A., 67. Green. D. C., 59. Griffin, W. H., 37. Gwynn, W., 41. Hallonquist, J. H., 72. Hardee. W. J. 46. Harris, D. B., 36. Hawes J. M., 54. Haynes, M. A., 46. Hebert. L., 54; P. O., 47. Helm, B. H.. 63. Henry. M. W., 76. Heth H.. 57. Heywood. W. C.; 45; J. H., 69; R. C., 69. Hill, A. P., 56; D. H., 51. Holloway E. B., 53. Holmes, T. H., 44. Holt, G. W., 72. Hood, J. B., 66. Hoxton. L. G., 75. Huger B., 42; F., 75. Huse, C., 62. Ives, J. C., 63. Jackson, A., 93; George, 69; T. J., 55; T. K., 57; W. H., 70. Johnson, B. R., 47 E. 46. Johnston, A. S., 42; J. E., 44; R., 61. Jones, D. R. 55; J. M. 39; R. T., 39; ., 49; T. M.. 66; W. E., 57. Jordon, T., 48. Kerr, J. M., 75. Kimmel, M. M., 71. Lawton, A. R., 47. Lay, G. W., 51. Lea, A. M. 45. Leadbetter, D., 38. Lee, C. C.. 69; F., 70; G. W. C., 66; R. B., 40; R. E., 43 S. D., 67. Locke. J. J.. 43. Lockett, S. H.
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Eject of the News in Norfolk. Norfolk, Va., June 12, 1861. The greatest excitement was witnessed here last evening. out of the announcement that a dispatch had been received by Col. Huger, stating that 4,500 of the Lincoln hirelings were met by 1,000 Confederate troops under Col. Magruder, at Bethel Church, between Yorktown and Williamsburg and defeated with great loss. At night, tar barrels were burned, and the utmost enthusiasm exhibited. The dispatch says our men fought like lions, and the greatest skill and bravery are to be awarded them in the struggle. Col. Magruder receives the lasting praise of our people, as he will the whole South, for his action in this contest. It is but a part, however, of his military character to be expert in war. The event has been received here with such glowing delight that I could not forbear making mention of it, although you have probably been advised of the minutest particular
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