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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 74 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 74 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 4 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 65 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 64 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 62 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 60 4 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 59 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 2 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Meade at Gettysburg. (search)
ere thus engaged, our cavalry was doing good service on both flanks. General Farnsworth, on our left, with one brigade, made a gallant charge against the enemy's infantry; and, on our right, General Gregg successfully resisted an attempt of General Stuart to pass to our rear while Pickett attacked us in front. Thus ended, in victory for the Union army, the battle of Gettysburg, one of the greatest battles on record-great in its results, as well as in the skill and valor with which it was fseem to over-estimate him, we give the opinion of General Lee, the man of all others best qualified to judge of the skill of our generals. In an article written by Colonel J. Esten Cooke, who served in the Southern army, on the staff of General J. E. B. Stuart, that officer says: General Lee esteemed the late General Meade very highly as a soldier, declaring that he was the best officer in the Federal army, and had given him more trouble than any of them. General Grant, too, has put on
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), A campaign with sharpshooters. (search)
ned pursuer. At Farmville a decided stand was made, and here the rear guard was joined by Fitz Lee and his cavalry. The fighting on the retreat, except in rare instances, did not reach the dignity of pitched battles; but one action that took place near Farmville deserves the record it has so far received from no pen or tongue. When the army reached this point, the conduct of operations in the rear was intrusted to Major General Fitz Lee, of cavalry fame; an officer who, after the death of Stuart, ranked first in the army for energy, elan, and all other qualities that make the ideal beau sabruer. With a small column of infantry, and such of his own command as he was yet able to hold together, Fitz Lee stoutly guarded the rear of the retreating army. As the main column passed the bridge in rear of Farmville, Fitz Lee in person held the town, gradually diminishing his front, which was closely pressed by the enemy, till there remained with him but a handful of brave men. Seated on hors
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign in Pennsylvania. (search)
s corps; then moved by Ashby's and Snicker's Gaps into the Valley, and likewise crossed the Potomac river, leaving to General Stuart the task of holding the gaps of the Blue Ridge Mountains with his corps of cavalry. The Federal commander had meanwh hand. The absence of that indispensable arm of the service was most seriously felt by General Lee. He had directed General Stuart to use his discretion as to where and when to cross the river — that is, he was to cross east of the mountains, or refact immediately, without forcing an engagement. No tidings whatever had been received from, or of our cavalry under General Stuart, since crossing the river; and General Lee was consequently without accurate information of the movements, or positioched for this service. On the side of the Confederates, the entire cavalry corps is included. That portion which General Stuart accompanied made a complete circuit of the Federal army, and only joined General Lee on the evening of the second day
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
lement of that grand army. The rebel cavalry under Stuart, and his lieutenants, the younger Lees, had from the forces confronting on the river. The strength of Stuart's command at this time was subsequently ascertained Wyndham, fell upon the enemy so furiously that General Stuart's headquarters were captured. There were no rend to impede the march of our army. The advance of Stuart's command had reached Aldie, and here, on June 17thdecided successes for us, and terminated in driving Stuart's cavalry through the gap at Paris. On June 17the division advanced to Middleburg, where a part of Stuart's force was posted, and was attacked by Colonel Irvkett's Division on our line, it was discovered that Stuart's cavalry was moving to our right, with the evidentt of war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met by General Gregg, with two of his brigades e details of the fight, it need only be added, that Stuart advanced not a pace beyond where he was met; but af
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Recollections of General Reynolds. (search)
r to report, for the information of Major General Reynolds, commanding the corps, that Mrs. —, named in your communication of this date, has called at these headquarters, and has given me the following information: I live about four miles and a half from Martinsburg, on the road to Shepherdstown, in the lines of the rebel army. The rebel infantry all left that neighborhood on Thursday night of this week. I think the whole rebel army was there. When they left they moved toward Winchester. Stuart's cavalry have been left. The number I do not know. They have torn up the railroad and everything belonging to the road at Martinsburg, and down toward Kearneyville. They took up the cross-ties and burnt them, putting the rails on the fire. They are treating the Union citizens badly, and using and destroying their property. This is all of any importance that Mrs. — seemed to know in reference to the movements and conduct of the enemy. The next day, the whole army was in motion for t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of fleet Wood. (search)
e, when stating the force of the cavalry under Stuart's command in June, 1863, General Gregg falls ithese deductions are made, it will appear that Stuart's available force did not much exceed, if at afield remained in the undisputed possession of Stuart, save that from the opposite hills a fierce arandy Station,! or The battle of Fleetwood, as Stuart called it, was one of the most splendid passagrt-House. On the 7th of June, he notified General Stuart that he would review his cavalry on the neth everything in readiness for an early start, Stuart himself bivouacked on the night of the 8th, one danger. Before sending Hampton into action, Stuart had ordered that one of his regiments be detact Pennsylvania Cavalry. My authority is this: Stuart states, in his report, that the Thirty-fifth V. Through their colonel they presented to General Stuart an humble confession of their fault, and aumn, and delay its progress. (Signed) J. E. B. Stuart, Major General. See Reports of battle[20 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
the 4th and 5th of June. Hood's Division and Stuart's cavalry moved at the same time. On the 8th,cross the Rappahannock, and sent to attack General Stuart. They were encountered at Brandy Station,by's gaps, and the line of the Blue Ridge. General Stuart was in my front and on my flank, reconnoitI was leaving the Blue Ridge, I instructed General Stuart to follow me, and to cross the Potomac at s from General Lee; whereupon I withdrew. General Stuart held the gap for a while, and then hurried eyes shut. General Lee says of his orders to Stuart: General Stuart was left to guard the passes oGeneral Stuart was left to guard the passes of the mountains and to observe the movements of the enemy, who he was instructed to harass and impedempt to cross the Potomac. In that event, General Stuart was directed to move into Maryland, crossi's statement) by the deplorable absence of General Stuart and the perplexity occasioned thereby. Wiopportunity for an effective blow. Third, General Stuart should not have been permitted to leave th[10 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
ther communications captured, was evident. Stuart, stung at being surprised, soon had his commannnoissance, I stated I was of the opinion that Stuart was not now likely to cross the river. The GeWarrenton Junction until the 16th of June, and Stuart never made any attempt to cross the river duril Lee's intentions. Did General Lee know that Stuart's papers had been lost? Did he or Stuart supptime with his corps, and communicated with General Stuart. He knew, therefore, that General Stuart ain the whereabouts of General Hooker's army. Stuart had been doing his best to execute General Leethe Bull Run mountains; but, unfortunately for Stuart, the enemy harassed him so much, and drove him second dispatch was brought him, stating that Stuart, with his cavalry, were making a raid near Wasmmunication. I laughed at this news, and said Stuart has served us better than he is aware of; we se enemy when he was making a false move. That Stuart could only join Lee by recrossing the Potomac,[17 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
rom the official report of the Confederate General Stuart, which is of infinite importance to the trat, after the battles of Aldie and Upperville, Stuart became separated from Lee's army, and was prevposition of Gregg's and Kilpatrick's Cavalry. Stuart was thereby compelled to make a wide detour, o Robertson, and Jones, which did not accompany Stuart upon his independent movement, were amply sufforrect in the main, but he erroneously locates Stuart with his cavalry on the right of the Confederave promise of solid results and advantages. Stuart acknowledges that the position which he held wition. Gregg's position was as inferior to Stuart's as the general line occupied by the main bodenant A. C. M. Pennington. On the other hand, Stuart had with him, as he states in his report, Hamp go hard with the Army of the Potomac. It was Stuart's last reserve and his last resource, for, if ewn over the field in our possession. At dark Stuart withdrew to the York pike, preparatory to cove[15 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg (search)
war will understand. When opposite our right, Stuart was met by General Gregg with two of his brigatails of the fight, it need only be added that Stuart advanced not a pace beyond where he was met; b a withdrawal to the York road was directed by Stuart, because his advanced position was hazardous oo a victory over Gregg, at Gettysburg, made by Stuart. The results of the battle were so overwhelmiould construe the victory to his opponent. Stuart describes the charge of one of W. H. F. Lee's reports of the two commanders here being that Stuart mentions the repulse in the mildest language, isoners (a large number) taken to the rear. Stuart's artillery commanding the same ground as Gregfield remained in the undisputed possession of Stuart, save that an artillery duel was maintained un charge is not a charge. Every charge made by Stuart's cavalry on that day was met, and met successter the mounted charges had ceased, no part of Stuart's command occupied any portion of the field ex[31 more...]
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