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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
ss at Cambridge on their twenty-fifth year from graduation. On board a steamer, August 11, he wrote a letter denouncing Judge Kane's imprisonment of Passamore Williamson, the friend of fugitive slaves, on the charge of contempt of court. Works, vol. IV. pp. 52-57. Mr. Conger, M. C., of Michigan, was a fellow-passenger, and in his eulogy in the House, April 27, 1874, stated the circumstances under which this letter was written. On his rapid return home he made brief pauses at Saratoga, Lake George, the White Mountains (where he ascended Mount Washington), and Portland, and was in Boston September 6,—having in his absence, as he wrote, traversed eleven free States and three slave States. The journey was followed by his usual visit to his brother Albert at Newport. In a speech made a few weeks after his return, he spoke of certain incidents witnessed by him in the slave States, At Lexington, Ky. which were not calculated to shake his original convictions. Works, vol. IV. p.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, chapter 12 (search)
had ever eaten in the country, with an infinitude of other fruits; and that the lake extended close to the mountains, which were, according to my judgment, fifteen leagues from us. I saw others to the south, not less high than the former; only that they were without snow. The Indians told me it was there we were to go to meet their enemies, and that they were thickly inhabited, and that we must pass by a waterfall, Ticonderoga. which I afterwards saw, and thence enter another lake Lake George. three or four leagues long; and, having arrived at its head, there were four leagues overland to be travelled to pass to a river Hudson River. which flows towards the coast of the Almouchiquois, tending towards that of the Almouchiquois, Indians east of Cape Cod. and they were only two days going there in their canoes, as I understood since from some prisoners we took, who, by means of some Algonquin interpreters who were acquainted with the Iroquois language, conversed freely with
6 July 1707. No further trace of him has been discovered. Susanna Hancock, prob. the widow of Ebenezer, m. Jacob Hill 29 Sept. 1714. The dau. Susanna was named [1719] in her grandfather's will, and was prob. the same who m. Ebenezer Wyeth about 1726. 7. Solomon, s. of Nathaniel (3), was a shoemaker; m. Mary, daughter of Rev. Josiah Torrey of Tisbury, 4 Nov. 1730, and probably res. with his father on Holmes Place. He served in a company of Artillery during the French war, and d. at Lake George 20 Sept. 1756, a. 50. (His age is erroneously marked 57 on the gravestone.) His widow d. 18 Mar. 1799, a. 88. Their children were Nathaniel, b. 1 Aug. 1731, a housewright in Boston in 1773; Torrey, b. 4 Nov. 1733, d. young; Ebenezer, bap. 14 Aug. 1737, d. young; Mary, bap. 12 July 1741, d. unmarried—June 1828, a. 87, and is well remembered by very many; her res. was on the south side of the Common near Appian Way; Sarah, bap. 15 Ap. 1744, m. William Colson 21 Oct. 1779, and rem. to Nort
6 July 1707. No further trace of him has been discovered. Susanna Hancock, prob. the widow of Ebenezer, m. Jacob Hill 29 Sept. 1714. The dau. Susanna was named [1719] in her grandfather's will, and was prob. the same who m. Ebenezer Wyeth about 1726. 7. Solomon, s. of Nathaniel (3), was a shoemaker; m. Mary, daughter of Rev. Josiah Torrey of Tisbury, 4 Nov. 1730, and probably res. with his father on Holmes Place. He served in a company of Artillery during the French war, and d. at Lake George 20 Sept. 1756, a. 50. (His age is erroneously marked 57 on the gravestone.) His widow d. 18 Mar. 1799, a. 88. Their children were Nathaniel, b. 1 Aug. 1731, a housewright in Boston in 1773; Torrey, b. 4 Nov. 1733, d. young; Ebenezer, bap. 14 Aug. 1737, d. young; Mary, bap. 12 July 1741, d. unmarried—June 1828, a. 87, and is well remembered by very many; her res. was on the south side of the Common near Appian Way; Sarah, bap. 15 Ap. 1744, m. William Colson 21 Oct. 1779, and rem. to Nort
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
ngagement and marriage. Something of what he then underwent is described in the following passage from a letter to Mr. Charles Daveis, written August 4, 1821:— You know our journey taken on Mr. Norton's marriage. Prof. Andrews Norton (mentioned ante, p. 319) had recently married Miss Catherine Eliot, sister of Miss Anna Eliot, to whom Mr. Ticknor was engaged. There was never anything more delightful. We went first to New York, . . . . then up the North River, and to the beautiful Lake George, and Lake Champlain. . . . . . But the whole party was disposed, from the first, to give me the pleasure of seeing my father at Hanover, where he went early in May, some weeks before we left Boston; and we therefore crossed the Green Mountains, and came down by the exquisite banks of the White River, to its confluence with the Connecticut. The two last days of this ride were, certainly, the most gay and delightful of the gayest and most delightful journey I ever took in my life. On th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
seen. We could, in fact, adapt our reading to our real wants and best interests much more than we do now, and so do much more by it for the general improvement and elevation of the national character. To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Caldwell, Lake George, August 22, 1852. my dear Charles,—By this time you may, perhaps, be curious touching our whereabouts; and if you are not, I have some mind to give you an account of what we have done since I saw you last, and what we propose to do, peradvend died after six years illness, while we were at Niagara. The beauty of everything without, and the luxury, finish, exactness, of everything within, contrasted strongly with the noiseless stillness of a house of death . . . . Here, again,—Lake George, In the years from 1851 to 1855, inclusive, Mr. Ticknor and his family passed a part of each summer on the shores of this lovely lake.—is another contrast to the rushing glories of Niagara, for the beautiful, quiet lake is always before us,<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
dition I shall sacrifice the plates to my vanity of making the book as good as I can. Meantime, the old Spanish books do no harm; they amuse me, and they will be valuable in some public library hereafter. . . . . To C. S. Daveis. Caldwell, Lake George, August 2, 1854. My dear Charles,—. . . . Since I wrote the preceding pages Cogswell has come in upon us for a few days; he looks a little thin and pale, as a man well may who has been in New York all summer, but he seems in good health andat, as all men in the United States have this summer, I suppose, but less than most of them. The thermometer has averaged about seven or eight degrees below the temperature from Boston to Baltimore. . . . . To Sir E. Head, Bart. Caldwell, Lake George, August 3, 1854. My dear Sir Edmund,—I am delighted with the news Sir Edmund Head was appointed Governor-General of Canada. In the autumn of this year, when he transferred his residence from Fredericton to Quebec, he passed through Bost
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
orite with him. When once the work of preparing a proper building had been taken in hand, Mr. Bates began to give cautious intimations of further generous purposes in relation to the Library. He kept up a frequent correspondence with Mr. Everett and Mr. Ticknor, and in July, 1855, he finally expressed, to both of them, a distinct intention of giving a large quantity of books to fill the shelves of the new edifice as soon as it should be ready. Mr. Ticknor was passing the summer at Lake George, and there received two letters to this effect from Mr. Bates, and one from Mr. Everett enclosing what he had received. Immediately each of these gentlemen expressed the conviction, that some one should go soon to England to confer with this liberal benefactor, and each proposed that the other should go. Mr. Ticknor urged Mr. Everett, as far as he thought he properly might, to undertake this mission, and Mr. Everett answered him in the following terms, both feeling that this was a turnin
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
139, 148, 151, 152, 155, 257, 263, 44 and note, 360, 351, II. 106, 494. Lafayette, Madame de, II. 106. La Fontaine, Auguste, I. 112. Lagrange, visits, I. 151, 152. La Granja. See St. Ildefonso. Laharpe, General, II. 35, 36. Lake George, visits, II. 281 and note, 289. Lallemand, General, II. 113. Lamartine, A. de, I. 470 note, II. 116, 117, 119, 128, 136, 137, 141. Lamb, Charles, I. 294. Lamb, Sir, Frederic, II. 1. Lansdowne, Marchioness of, I. 418, 415, II. 151. Paris, 102-143; London and Scotland, 144-183; return to America, 183, 184. 1838-56. Life in Boston, 184-311; summers at Woods' Hole, 187, 208-210; journeys, 221. 222; Geneseo, 225; journeys, 226-228; Manchester, Mass., 239, 268; journeys and Lake George, 277, 281, 289. 1840-49. History of Spanish Literature, 243-262. 1850. Visit to Washington, 263, 264. 1852-67. Connection with Boston Public Library, 299-320. 1856-57. Third visit to Europe, 321-400; London, Brussels, Dresden, Berlin, Vienn
rge cavalry force was not far distant, no time was lost in returning to the boats and recrossing the river, with a capture of 62 men, 1 captain and 1 lieutenant, without having fired a gun. After crossing the river, feeling assured all was safe, a needed rest was taken. Having planned another expedition, 15 miles up the river to Fort Butler, and having transportation for not more than 25 men, he set out with this heroic little band and his gallant Lieutenant McEaddy. He crossed little Lake George and, leaving a guard of three men with the boats, marched a short distance. Anticipating another capture, Captain Dickison wrote demanding the surrender of the Federal command. While thus engaged, a cavalryman rode from a farmhouse near by and was within 50 yards of our men before he was seen by our picket. The men were ordered not to fire and a vigorous pursuit was made, one detachment of 12 men under Sergt. Charles Dickison—son of the captain—following in the direction of the house,
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