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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
steamer could make at times fourteen knots, her highest speed that day was twelve and a half. At night the Florida changed her course and ran off to Cuba, where she was burning prizes the next day, while the Cuyler was looking for her in the Yucatan channel. On the day after the Florida ran out, the Oneida was sent to Key West with despatches for Admiral Bailey, informing him of the escape of the Florida. Bailey sent her to the coast of Cuba; but she missed the Confederate cruiser, and Wilkes, commanding the Flying Squadron, having fallen in with her, constituted her a part of his force, as well as the Cuyler, to the no small injury of the blockade; an act which subsequently brought down upon him the displeasure of the Department. Galveston, the third point of importance in the Gulf, was, like Mobile, comparatively easy of blockade, except against vessels of the lightest draft. The absence of strong fortifications, especially in the early part of the war, enabled the blockadi
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
screw-sloop San Jacinto, commanded by Captain Charles Wilkes. Early in November, 1861, the San Jacvy Department, somewhat prematurely, gave Captain Wilkes an emphatic commendation. But the Secretan that Great Britain, by condemning the act of Wilkes, had for the first time acknowledged the illegvessel and sending her in for adjudication. Wilkes probably had some such idea in his mind, for h illegality was due to the principle, of which Wilkes lost sight for the moment, that the captor of ls were subsequently added to the squadron. Wilkes sailed from Hampton Roads in the Wachusett on e, ran directly into his cruising ground. But Wilkes was unable to find them; and the main purpose on the subject, and to suggest that if any of Wilkes's ships came into his neighborhood, he should ctions. This judicious plan was defeated by Wilkes. On the 28th of February, the Vanderbilt, afte, fell in with the Wachusett off St. Thomas. Wilkes thereupon left the Wachusett, and transferring[6 more...]
mand of naval defences of Virginia, 76; sinks Merrimac. 78 Texas, blockade and coast of, 46 Torpedoes, invention and early history of, 3 et seq. Tredegar Iron Works, 22, 54 Trent, the, 177 et seq. Tuscaloosa, the, 199 et seq. Union, the, blockades Savannah, 85 Vanderbilt, the, 77, 203 et seq. Vincennes, the, 128, 130 et seq. Wachusett, the, captures the Florida, 188, 202 Ward, Commodore, Jas. H., 85 et seq.; killed, 88 Water Witch, the, 122, 128 et seq. Weehawken, the, captures the Atlanta, 117 et seq. Westfield, the, 143, 144 (note); 146 et seq.; destroyed, 150 Wilkes, Captain, 140; seizes Mason and Slidell, 177 et seq. Wilkes, Captain, Chas., commands flying squadron, 201; relieved of command, 203 et seq. Wilmington, 85, 87 et seq.; harbor of, 91, 92 et seq. Winslow, Lieutenant, Francis, 128 et seq., 135 Worden, Lieutenant John L., commands Monitor, 56, 67 et seq.; wounded, 71, 75 (note); commands Montauk, 216 Wyalusing, the, 99
The Romance of war. --How Captain Wilkes got even with John Bull.--The Brooklyn (N. Y.) Times is responsible for the following: Captain Wilkes, the bold and responsibility-assuming commander of the San Jacinto, who caused a gun to be fired across the bows of the British steamer Trent, brought her to, and relieved her oCaptain Wilkes, the bold and responsibility-assuming commander of the San Jacinto, who caused a gun to be fired across the bows of the British steamer Trent, brought her to, and relieved her of Messrs. Mason and Slidell, and their Secretaries, is now about 56 years of age. Consequently, as Jack Bunsby would say, he was once younger than he is now. Though every inch a sailor, and not often given to the melting mood, the blind god once succeeded in sending one of his shafts clear through his rough son' sweater, which fourival, contented himself with "poisoning" the mind of the "stern parent" of the fair one, until he refused his consent to his daughter's marriage with the bold Chas. Wilkes, and insisted upon her giving her hand to young Slidell; when, after many protestatations, and the customary amount of tears and hysterics, she did, and became
ry for their relief. When the rebellion has been crushed out it will be easy to arrest and punish the ringleaders. including those who have been imprisoned. As there are instances on record of our having exchanged prisoners even with the Algerine pirates, why should it not be done for the advantage of brave and loyal men, who are guilty of no other crime than that of faith fully defending their country. Secretary Welles on naval Precedents. Navy Department, Nov. 30, 1861. Copt. Chas. Wilkes, Commanding the U. S. Steamer San Jacinto: Sir: I congratulate you on your safe arrival, and especially do I congratulate you on the great public service you have rendered in the capture of the Confederate emissaries. Messrs. Mason and Slidell have been conspicuous in this conspiracy to dissolve the Union, and it is well known that when seized by you they were on a mission hostile to the Government of the country. Your conduct in seizing these public enemies was marked by intellige
srs. Mason and Slidell, the rebel Commissioners to Europe, has very naturally caused great excitement. From the telegraphic statement, we think it clear that Captain Wilkes has violated international rights, and this act must be disavowed by the Government, they being on their European voyage, and an apology be made to the British Government. National honor, justice and consistency would seem to demand this of us. Captain Wilkes has done the very thing, in principle, for which we went to war with England for doing. It is true that the right of search exists in a time of war, and veers in the belligerent; but this forcible seizure of political prisoners,ly for a vigorous prosecution of the war — after arguing against the policy of their seizure, says: The whole country will applaud the zeal and pluck of Captain Wilkes in this transaction; but coll and sober minded men must nevertheless condemn it. He has brought the country into a bad scrape, and the sooner we get out of it
[special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch]Northern news. Secretary Seward's letter to Minister Dayton--Com. Wilkers's official report — Congressional, &c. Norfolk, Dec. 12. --The following items of news are taken from latest Northern papers received here: Washington, Dec. 10.--Secretary Seward's letter to Minister Dayton, of France, is out. He is very anxious to abolish privateering. Thouvenel is chary. Seward rejects his proposition of neutrality. Commodore Wilkes's official statement, about Mason and Slidell, charges the British agent with complicity in their escape to Europe. Mr. Pendleton, of Ohio, moved that Congress alone shall have the power to suspend the writ of habeas corpus. He spoke at length upon his resolution. It was afterwards tabled by a vote of four to one. New York, Dec. 10.--Cotton firm but unchanged. Sales of 1,800 bales at 31a31½. Stock exchange — U. S. coupons $93a93¾; Virginia 6's $67a6
Report of Capt. Wilkes.why he did not seize the Trent. The following is the report of Capt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this shiCapt. Wilkes, assigning his reasons for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 16. Sir: --In my dispatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the reports of the movement of this ship, and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and Macfarland, as I intended to write you particularly relative to the reasons which induced my action in making these prisoners. When I heard at Cienfuegos, on the south side of Cuba, of these Commissioners having landed on the Island of Cuba, anI am assured they are quite content to forego any advantages which might have accrued to them under the circumstances. I may add that having assumed the responsibility, I am willing to abide the result. I am, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy.
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource], The orders for the arrest of Mason and Slidell. (search)
The orders for the arrest of Mason and Slidell. The following is a copy of the orders issued by Captain Wilkes, of the San Jacinto, to Lieut. Fairfax, executive officer of that vessel, for the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell: "U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, At Sea, Nov. 8, 1861. "Sir: You will have the second and third cutters of this ship fully manned and armed, and be, in all respects, prepared to board the steamer Trent, now hove to under our guns. "On boarding her you ster. "Lieut. James A. Greer will take charge of the third cutter, which accompanies you, and will assist you in these duties. "I trust that all those under your command, in executing this important and delicate duty, will conduct themselves with all the delicacy and kindness which becomes the character of our naval service. "I am, very respectfully, "Your obedient servant, (Signed,) "Charles Wilkes, "Captain, "Lieut. D. M. Fairfax, U. S. Navy, Executive Officer, San Jacinto."
be put again under the protection of the British flag, accompanied by proper ceremonials and apology, or Lord Lyone is to demand his passports. If half of this be true, compliance is impossible. The Yankee Government have adopted the act of Wilkes irrevocably. Their House of Representatives have passed a resolution of approbation and thanks. Their Secretary of Navy has not only approved the conduct of his officer, but expressed a regret that the vessel had not been captured and brought into port as a prize. Their Secretary of State has written a letter of commendation to Wilkes; and their President has alluded, approvingly, to the act in his annual Message. Their Government has received the captured persons as prisoners, and placed them in close confinement. And lastly, the whole expression of popular sentiment at the North, through their press, and all other organs of utterance, has been in approval, in hearty and cordial commendation of the boarding and the seizure. O
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