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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., New Orleans before the capture. (search)
now, as one tells of it; but the times were grim. Opposite the rear of the store where I was now employed,--for it fronted in Common street and stretched through to Canal,--the huge, unfinished custom-house reared its lofty granite walls, and I used to go up to its top now and then to cast my eye over the broad city and harbor below. When I did so, I looked down upon a town that had never been really glad again after the awful day of Shiloh. She had sent so many gallant fellows to help Beauregard, and some of them so young,--her last gleaning,--that when, on the day of their departure, they marched with solid column and firm-set, unsmiling mouths down the long gray lane made by the open ranks of those old Confederate Guards, and their escort broke into cheers and tears and waved their gray shakoes on the tops of their bayonets and seized the dear lads' hands as they passed in mute self-devotion and steady tread, while the trumpets sang Listen to the Mocking-bird, that was the last
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Incidents of the occupation of New Orleans. (search)
an lived not in the city who dared to haul down the flag from over the City Hall. The people-boys generally — were perfectly quiet until near the City Hall, when they began to give vent to their feelings by Hurrah for Jeff Davis! Hurrah for Beauregard! and the use of some angry language.--Editors. The mob tired itself out, and no longer threatened such violence as on the 26th. On the 29th Farragut decided that the time had come for him to take formal possession of the city; he felt that s. took it to the floor below and handed it to Captain Bell, who on our return to the Scene at the City Hall — hauling down the State flag. The local papers spoke of the State flag on the City I-all at the time as the Lone Star flag. General Beauregard, in a letter to Admiral Preble, in 1872, says this flag was adopted in 1861 by the State Convention of Louisiana. It had thirteen stripes, four blue, six white, and three red, commencing at the top, with the colors as written. The Union w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Operations of 1861 about Fort Monroe. (search)
ontraband. from a War-time sketch on the ground that if left on farms or in gardens aid and comfort to the enemy might ensue. There were few cases of real lawlessness, consequently the Beauty and Booty proclamation This proclamation by General Beauregard was dated Department of Alexandria, Camp Pickens, June 5th, 1861, and was addressed To the Good People of the Counties of Loudoun, Fairfax, and Prince William, in which, referring to the Union forces, he says: All rules of civilized warfare are abandoned, and they proclaim by their acts, if not on their banners, that their war-cry is Beauty and Booty. --Editors. of General Beauregard was uncalled for, and even in the vague and uncertain light of that day was absurd. The negroes in Virginia, learning of our presence, began to arrive at our camp in large numbers. While other commanders were hesitating and quibbling over the question, General Butler promptly declared slaves of Confederates contraband of war, inasmuch as they gav
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
afford room for manoeuvring and to enable the brigades to support each other. The contingency of the enemy's crossing the Potomac above the city was foreseen and promptly provided for. Had he attempted this about three months after the battle of Manassas, he would, upon reaching the rear of Washington, have found it covered by respectable works, amply garrisoned, with a sufficient disposable force to move upon his rear and force him to a decisive engagement. The words quoted are General Beauregard's. (See Vol. I., p. 221).--Editors. It would have been the greatest possible good fortune for us if he had made this movement at the time in question, or even some weeks earlier. It was only for a very few days after the battle of Bull Run that the movement was practicable, and every day added to its difficulty. Two things were at once clear: first, that a large and thoroughly organized army was necessary to bring the war to a successful conclusion; second, that Washington must be
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. by John D. Imboden, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. Soon after the battle of Bull Run Stonewall Jackson was promoted to major-general, and the Confederate Government having on the 21st of October, 1861, organized the Department of Northern Virginia, under command of General Joseph E. Johnston, it was divided into the Valley District, the Potomac District, and Aquia District, to be commanded respectively by Major-Generals Jackson, Beauregard, and Holmes. On October 28th General Johnston ordered Jackson to Winchester to assume command of his district, and on the 6th of November the War Department ordered his old Stonewall brigade and six thousand troops under command of Brigadier-General W. W. Loring to report to him. These, together with Turner Ashby's cavalry, gave him a force of about ten thousand men all told. A Confederate of 1862. His only movement of note in the winter of 1861-62 was an expedition at the end of December to Bath and Ro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
The Second battle of Bull Run. accompanying General Beauregard's paper on the first battle of Bull Run (Vol. I., pp. 196--227) are maps and many pictures of interest; with reference to the Second battle.--Editors. by John Pope, Major-General, U. S. A. Early in June, 1862, I was in command of the army corps known as the Army of the Mississippi, which formed the left wing of the army engaged in operations against Corinth, Miss., commanded by General Halleck. A few days after Corinth was evacuated I went to St. Louis on a short leave of absence from my command, and while there I received a telegram from Mr. Stanton, Secretary of War, requesting me to come to Washington immediately. I at once communicated the fact to General Halleck by telegraph, and received a reply from him strongly objecting to my leaving the army which was under Picketing the Rapidan. his command. I quite concurred with him both as to his objections to my going to Washington for public reasons and as to t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
enemies and brought about a brief but lively skirmish, from which both parties soon retired upon their respective friends — the Confederates, however, bearing off the spolia opima. General Ewell reaped the fruits of the contest, for he obtained and enjoyed his canteen of buttermilk. Shortly after this, then late in the afternoon, the Federal columns were discovered passing, and the Confederate Jackson's line on the afternoon of the last day, August 30th. The topography is after General Beauregard's map, made from survey after the first battle of Bull Run. The deep cut and the embankment as far as the Dump were the scene of the fighting with stones, illustrated on p. 534. Here the unfinished railroad embankment is made of earth and blasted rock taken front the cut. The Dump was a break in the embankment, or rather a space which was never filled in; several hundred Union soldiers were buried near it.--Editors. line, formed parallel to the turnpike, moved rapidly forward to the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
er when I have orders to take this powder to Beauregard without a minute's delay? The answer was inre shut up tightly in a box car, personating Beauregard's ammunition,--hearing sounds outside, but ueorgia, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, Beauregard must have reinforcements to meet the vast acf the Mississippi. On the 25th of May General Beauregard called his subordinate commanders togethhad indeed become apparent to every one, and Beauregard issued the appropriate orders the same night removed by the railways which were still at Beauregard's service. That the army was about to retreas within 4 miles of Halleck's headquarters; Beauregard with his entire army was still within 27 mila single prisoner, nor did he parole one. Beauregard, far from being frantic with alarm and despaa troops. The Official Records show that Beauregard lost less than 4000 on the retreat from Cori of Corinth occurred on the 30th of May, General Beauregard withdrawing his army to Tupelo, where, J[15 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
our advance, under Halleck, from Pittsburg Landing in April and May, 1862, was fought on the 3d and 4th of October, of that year, between the combined forces of Generals Earl Van Dorn and Sterling Price of the Confederacy, and the Union divisions of Generals David S. Stanley, Charles S. Hamilton, Thomas A. Davies, and Thomas J. McKean, under myself as commander of the Third Division of the District of West Tennessee. The Confederate evacuation of Corinth occurred on the 30th of May, General Beauregard withdrawing his army to Tupelo, where, June 27th, he was succeeded in the command by General Braxton Bragg. Halleck occupied Corinth on the day of its evacuation, and May 31st instructed General Buell, commanding the Army of the Ohio, to repair the Memphis and Charleston railway in the direction of Chattanooga — a movement to which, on June 11th, Halleck gave the objective of Chattanooga and Cleveland and Dalton ; the ultimate purpose being to take possession of east Tennessee, in coo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. Joseph Wheeler, Lieutenant-General, C. S. A. In the van. General Bragg succeeded General Beauregard in command of the Confederate troops at Tupelo, Miss., about fifty miles south of Corinth, on June 27th, 1862. The field returns of June 9th, a week after our army reached Tupelo, reported it at 45,080. To prevent misconception, and to avoid frequent repetitions, I will here state that through-out this paper when I mention the figures of field returns of Confederate troops I shall always include all officers, all non-commissioned officers, and all privates who are reported present for duty.--J. W. This return included the Army of Mississippi, reinforced by the troops brought from Arkansas by Generals Price and Van Dorn, together with detachments gathered from various localities. About two thousand cavalry not included in this return also belonged to the army. This was the maximum force General Bragg could expect to concentrate at that poi
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