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he Constitutions of individual States cannot be allowed to stand in the way of its vigorous prosecution. Gen. M'Clellan on Delinquent officers. A Court-Martial, of which Brig Gen. Hancock was President, has just found Col. Owens, Sixty- ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, guilty of a charge of "conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline, and unbecoming an officer and a gentle, man. The Court sentenced him (Col, Owen) to be dismissed the service of the United States. Gen McClellan in his order says: The finding and sentence of the Court are fully supported by the testimony, and are approved by the Major General commanding. It appears that on the 4th of October, 1862, the regiment of the of the accused was encamped near Harper's Ferry; that the forenoon of the day was passed by the accused at the headquarters of his brigade, in attendance upon a Court of Inquiry on the question of rank between himself and another officer. that he was then very much into
he Potomac continue to show an active forward movement, with the probability of a great battle at an early day, if the rebels remain in the Shenandoah Valley. Gen McClellan's headquarters were yesterday at Rectortown, a point at the conjunction of the Alexandria and Winchester turnpike with the Manassas Gap Railroad. Our cavalry ous duties of General Thomas he could not give his undivided attention to this subject, and Brig. Gen. Stoneman having been detached as chief of cavalry from General McClellan's staff, ordered to act in his stead. On the death of Gen. Kearney, however, Gen. Stoneman was appointed to a superior command, and since that time Colonel t, according to the act of Congress of 1833, no person who has been convicted of a criminal offence can be enlisted into the armies of the United States. Mrs. McClellan has closed her house in Washington city, and on Thursday, it is stated, proceeded to join her husband at the headquarters of the army. A letter to the Pi
d. Gen. Halleck says: "On the 6th of October Gen McClellan was peremptorily ordered to cross the Potomac and give there has been no such want of supplies in the army of Gen. McClellan as to prevent his compliance with the orders to advanc The creme of the letter consists of dissatisfaction with McClellan because he had not pushed into Virginia. The New Yorkgainst the superceded Major-General." The removal of McClellan has certainly produced a good deal of excitement in the Nk paper, sent on Sunday, asserted that the supersedure of McClellan created great excitement and dissatisfaction in the army.lellan. The following is a copy of the order removing McClellan: War Department, Adj't Gen.'s office, Washington, NovPresident of the United States, it is ordered that Major-General McClellan is relieved from the command of the Army of the Pod with them in their feeling of respect and esteem for Gen. McClellan, entertained through long and most friendly associatio
Disgrace of McClellan. We are by no means sure that the removal of McClellan from command is calculated to do the Yankee cause any great damage. It is said that he is the best General they have, and we think it probable he is. Yet they could McClellan from command is calculated to do the Yankee cause any great damage. It is said that he is the best General they have, and we think it probable he is. Yet they could have fallen upon no man who could have made a more signal failure then he did in his campaign against Richmond. If he be the best, they must all be exceedingly bad.--If Burnside be any worse than McClellan, he is not likely to take Richmond in a huMcClellan, he is not likely to take Richmond in a hurry. It is plain that the Yankees mean to make an immediate move upon Richmond. The appearance of their gunboats in James river, simultaneously with the dismissal of McClellan, indicate this fact in a manner which can leave no doubt. There isMcClellan, indicate this fact in a manner which can leave no doubt. There is just as little that they are in great force.--But, "it is a far cry to Richmond," and they have not reached it yet, From present appearances they seem to be inclining once more to Fredericksburg, where they will be in reach of their gunboats, and o
The Daily Dispatch: March 1, 1864., [Electronic resource], Yankee Raids on the Virginia Central railroad--damage thus far Trifling — Exciting rumors of the enemy's movements. (search)
nating Convention. What Lincoln's administration has done. Bennett, in commenting upon a recent report which Gen McClellan has published in the North, thus sums up what has been done for the country by interference with, and removal of thatcessary to carry that campaign to a successful issue, caused its failure. The administration, by its suspension of General McClellan in August, 1862, caused the successive disasters of Pope's campaign. And the administration, by the removal of GenGen McClellan in the fall of 1862, caused directly the massacre at Fredericksburg, the greater massacre at Chancellorsville, the advance of Lee into Pennsylvania, where the country was saved by the stubborn qualities of our soldiers, and Lee's eventualation has done; but it has not given an effective blow in the East towards the destruction of the Confederacy since General McClellan was sacrificed to the clamor of the radicals. Affairs at Norfolk. A letter dated Norfolk, February 24, app
closed in New York, and the two swords have gone to Grant and Rowan, two New men, who defeated McClellan and Farragut, two of the used up heroes. The New York, times, in a sketch of one day's proceend Union square buildings at the close of the Fair last evening was 16,156, of which McClellan received8,209 Grant7,824 Scattering123 McClellan's maj385 The highest number of votes McClellan's maj385 The highest number of votes cast by one person was by Mrs James Gordon Bennett, who gave three hundred for Gen McClellan. Among the visitors, in the forenoon, was Mrs General Grant. Before she left the hall she went up toGen McClellan. Among the visitors, in the forenoon, was Mrs General Grant. Before she left the hall she went up to the "sword" registry, paid her dollar, and modestly put down her name for Gen McClellan, who stood, at 3 P M, three hundred and eighty ahead. General Grant's friends, however, are said to have a poGen McClellan, who stood, at 3 P M, three hundred and eighty ahead. General Grant's friends, however, are said to have a powerful reserve, which, if brought up to night, may turn the scales. Among the contributions recently arrived from Europe should be mentioned one that is of the highest interest. It is an origin
e to secure that end. Grant's "fine turning movements."--how he was to have Operated on McClellan's old ground. It is very amusing to read extracts from the army correspondence of the New The Washington Union, presuming that Mr. Grant would enter Richmond from the "old ground of McClellan," reached by "that fine turning movement," thus explains how the operation was to be accomplis In the attack on Richmond it will be necessary to fight over the very ground occupied by General McClellan General Averill occupied Hawes's shop and Shady Grove at the time of the Hanover Court-Hou It will be necessary for General Grant to invest Richmond property, to occupy the very ground McClellan did, throwing his left wing around to-wards the Charles City Court House road, and his right bearing, behind which is the swamp in front of Fair Oaks. When Gen Grant does this, he is in Gen McClellan's old position with a much larger force. Morgan's raid in Kentucky--forces sent in purs
, and we may calculate with confidence that nothing less than this has been and is his design, and that no effort or stratagem will be left untried for that purpose. We have no fears for Richmond, not the slightest, nor any reverence for Grant as a great General. His object being the capture of Richmond and Gen. Lee's army, what evidence of generalship was there in permitting Lee to strip him of seventy five thousand men on his way to Richmond by the Rapidan, when by adopting at once McClellan's movement on the Peninsula he could have saved that immense force and thrown it between Lee and the South? Would not the seventy-five thousand men he has lost by coming on that famous line which he vowed he would stick to if it took all summer be very convenient now to move upon the rear of Petersburg, a movement which he may intend still to make, and which, if he were a great General, he would have provided for by placing there that immense host which he has made food for Confederate ri
The cause of Grant's failure. The New York Herald tells us that but for the interference of Old Abe, McClellan (the flagged, hunted, kicked and cuffed McClellan) would have taken Richmond two years ago; and that but for the same interference now Grant would have taken it two weeks ago. In both instances according to the HeralMcClellan) would have taken Richmond two years ago; and that but for the same interference now Grant would have taken it two weeks ago. In both instances according to the Herald, he was prompted by jealousy of his own Generals, and the wish to secure his own re-nomination and re-election. The following paragraph is rich beyond expression, in mortification and chagrin: "By that act, and later ones of the same nature, he crushed a commander who had the ability to put the rebellion down. Then we had President could only acquiesce. But he has already begun term ploy against this General the very tactics by which he prevented the success of our cause under Gen McClellan, and with what effect the present position of the contest shows. Had Gen Grant been left alone, with his simple but admirable plan for the destruction of Lee'
e Potomac, June 24. Maj. Holt, of the First Massachusetts, is slightly wounded. It is reported that the Seventeenth New York battery has lost four guns by being surprised. Skirmishing was continued all last night on burled, but with what result is not yet known. The Third Excelsior Regiment, Lieut Colonel Leonard commanding, will leave here to morrow for home, their term of service having expired. This regiment participated in all the battles of the Peninsula, under Gen McClellan, and with the exception of Antietam, all those in which the Army of the Potomac have been engaged. The shelling of Petersburg. Under date "Front of Petersburg, June 2," the Herald's correspondent thus hazards forth the villainy of its commander During the night Col Tidball, chief of the 2d corps artillery, having previously examined the ground in front posted several batteries at favorable points — some even in advance of the infantry skirmish line and this morning they th
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