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December 7. The United States mail steamer Ariel was captured off the eastern shore of Cuba by the rebel privateer Alabama, but was released after some detention, on giving a bond for two hundred and twenty-eight thousand dollars, payable in thirty days after the acknowledgment of the rebel government.--General A. P. Hovey, returned to Friar's Point on the Mississippi, this morning. The battle of Prairie Grove, or Fayetteville, Arkansas, was this day fought between the National forces under the command of Generals Blunt and Herron, and the rebels under Generals Hindman, Marmaduke, Parsons, and Frost, resulting in the defeat of the latter with heavy loss.--(Doc. 24.) A fight took place at Hartsville, Tenn., between a body of Union troops under the command of Colonel A. B. Moore, of the One Hundred and Fourth Illinois, and a numerically much superior force of rebels under General John H. Morgan, resulting in the surrender of the whole Union force.--(Doc. 65.)
December 12. A skirmish took place near Corinth, Miss., between a body of Union troops, under Colonel Sweeney, Fifty-second Illinois, and a rebel force, commanded by Colonel Roddy, resulting in a rebel loss of eleven killed, thirty wounded, and forty prisoners. The Union party lost one killed and two prisoners.--One thousand seven hundred and fifty paroled Union prisoners, captured by the rebel guerrilla chiet, John H. Morgan, arrived at Nashville, Tenn., this day. A reconnoissance was this day made by a strong force of Union troops, under the command of General Ferry, to the Blackwater River, Va. The rebels were discovered, in great strength, all along the river in the vicinity of Zuni. After an artillery fight of three or four hours, in which the rebels were driven back, the National force returned to their camp at Suffolk.--(Doc. 71.) This afternoon the gunboat Essex, accompanied by the transport Winona, while making a reconnoissance of the fortifications at Port H
nough patriotism in the land, North as well as South, to save the present Union under the existing Constitution, with all its guarantees and obligations, if the great heart of the nation can be touched and aroused. All that is wanting is a little time and patriotic forbearance. --A brief skirmish took place in the vicinity of Munfordville, Ky., between a detachment of the Second Michigan cavalry, under the command of Lieutenant Darrow, and the advance-guard of the rebel forces, under General J. H. Morgan, resulting in a retreat of the latter with some loss.--(Doc. 88.) The obsequies of Rev. A. B. Fuller, late Chaplain of the Sixteenth regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, killed at Fredericksburgh, Va., took place at Boston, Mass.--A portion of Colonel Spears's Eleventh Pennsylvania cavalry, had a spirited engagement at Joiner's Bridge, four miles above Franklin, on the Blackwater River, Va., with a squadron of rebel cavalry and a body of infantry, whom he dispersed, capturing on
December 27. Elizabethtown, Ky., was this day captured by the rebel forces, under General J. H. Morgan, after a short resistance by the Union garrison of the post, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. S. Smith. An immense amount of public and private property was destroyed and carried off by the rebel troops.--(Docs. 52 and 88.) A fight took place at Dumfries, Va., between the garrison of the town, consisting of three infantry regiments, a section of a field-battery, and a regiment of cavalry, under the command of Colonel Charles Candy, and the rebel forces of Generals Stuart and Fitz-Hugh Lee, with a battery of artillery, in all about three thousand five hundred men, resulting, after a desperate conflict of several hours' duration, in a retreat of the rebel forces with great loss.--(Doc. 89.) Yesterday the expeditionary army, under General Sherman, successfully disembarked near the mouth of the Yazoo River, and to-day marched on Vicksburgh.--(Doc. 91.) To-
February 15. A party of the One Hundred and Twenty-third Illinois regiment, under the command of Colonel James Monroe, in company with twenty of Stokes's Tennessee cavalry, encountered a body of rebel cavalry belonging to Gen. J. H. Morgan's force, at a point near Cainesville, Tenn., and after a sharp conflict completely routed them, killing twenty, wounding a large number, and taking six prisoners. He also captured fifty horses and destroyed three hundred stands of arms. During the action three of Colonel Monroe's men were wounded.--Cincinnati Gazette. A detachment of fourteen men of the Second Minnesota volunteers, under the command of Sergeant L. N. Holmes, while escorting a wagon-train near Nolensville, Tenn., were attacked by a party of rebel guerrilla cavalry, numbering one hundred and thirty-five men. The small Union party stood firm, and returned the rebel fire with such effect, that in a few minutes they had killed eight, wounded twenty, and taken four of their n
Greenville, Miss., between the rebel forces under General Ferguson, and the Nationals, commanded by General Burbridge. In the action, Major Mudd, of the Twenty-second Illinois cavalry, was killed.--New York Tribune. A skirmish took place near Athens, Ky., between a party of National troops and a body of Morgan's guerrillas, who were making a raid through that State. In the fight, Dr. Theophilus Steele, a rebel, was severely wounded, and Charlton Morgan, a brother to the rebel General John H. Morgan, with others, was taken prisoner. The One Hundred and Thirty-third New York regiment, accompanied by a company of cavalry, went from Plaquemine to Rosedale, La., a distance of nearly thirty miles, to break up a rebel camp, supposed to be situated there. They found the rebels had gone, but some medicines, nineteen bales of cotton, and several horses were taken, together with four prisoners. A portion of the party went three miles above Port Hudson, on the opposite side of the ri
March 20. A battle was this day fought at Vaught's Hill, near Milton, Tenn., between a body of Union troops under the command of Colonel A. S. Hall, of the One Hundred and Fifth Ohio, and the rebel forces under Generals Wheeler and Morgan, terminating, after a well-contested struggle, in the defeat and retreat of the rebels, with a loss of nearly four hundred of their number killed and wounded.-(Doc. 141.)
must not disguise the fact that we have traitors in our midst, who are doing all in their power to involve this country in the horrors of civil war; to such persons, I say, pause and reflect well before plunging into the yawning abyss of treason. An indignant people will rise in their majesty, and swift retributive justice will be their certain doom. General Stanley, with two thousand cavalry, and an infantry brigade under Colonel Mathews, left Murfreesboro, on an expedition to capture Morgan's and Wharton's rebel regiments of infantry and cavalry at Snow Hill, Tenn. Beyond Auburn they drove in the rebel pickets, the Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry turning the rebel right while Minty's cavalry, with a battery under Captain Newell, moved up in front. The rebels fled, but were again encountered at Smith's Ford and on Dry Fork, from both of which places they were driven with some loss. Finally they formed a third line on Snow Hill, when the Second and Fourth Ohio cavalry sent to thei
turnpike to Green Hill, Tenn. Dashing into a rebel camp where there was a large number of conscripts, on a sabre charge, he killed five and captured fifteen. He captured all their arms, horses, and equipment. The rebels were composed of parts of Morgan's and McCoun's men. Among the prisoners were Captain Bondy, of the Eighteenth Tennessee, and a lieutenant of Morgan's cavalry. A still-house, containing forty casks of liquors, was destroyed. One man was wounded. General Mitchell's command madMorgan's cavalry. A still-house, containing forty casks of liquors, was destroyed. One man was wounded. General Mitchell's command made the march of fifty-five miles in twelve hours.--National Intelligencer. The United States gunboats Hartford, Switzerland, and Albatross, which had been blockading the mouth of the Red River, on the Mississippi, since the first instant, got under way early this morning, and proceeded down to Bayou Sara, where they stopped, seized upon and threw into the river ten thousand sacks of corn, after which they proceeded to Port Hudson, coming to anchor five miles above the rebel batteries.--Gold
May 11. A fight took place in the vicinity of Greasy Creek, Ky., between a force of National troops under the command of Col. R. T. Jacob, and a large body of rebel cavalry under General John H. Morgan, terminating, after a desperate contest of seven hours duration, in which the rebels had nearly one hundred of their number killed and wounded, in a retreat of the Unionists with a loss of twenty-five killed and wounded.--Louisville Journal. Crystal Springs, Miss., on the New Orleans and Jackson Railroad, was entered and burned to-day by a party of National cavalry.
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