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ed his musket into the bomb-proof among the rebels, and eight or ten others who had ventured near the forts were wounded by our shells. As the ammunition gave out the vessels retired from action, and the ironclads and Minnesota, Colorado, and Susquehanna were ordered to open rapidly, which they did with such effect that it seemed to tear the works to pieces. We drew off at sunset, leaving the ironclads to fire through the night, expecting the troops would attack in the morning, when we would first line, followed in order by the Mohican, Tacony, Kansas, Yantic, Unadilla, Huron, Maumee, Pequot, Pawtuxet, Seneca, Pontoosuc, and Nereus, thirteen vessels. The Minnesota led the second line, followed in order by the Colorado, Wabash, Susquehanna, Powhatan, Juniata, Shenandoah, Ticonderoga, Vanderbilt, Mackinaw, and Tuscarora, eleven heavy vessels. The Santiago de Cuba led the third line, followed in order by the Fort Jackson, Osceola, Sassacus, Chippewa, Cuyler, Maratanza, Rhode Is
flag-officer Francis S. Dupont and Captain Charles H. Davis, Chief of staff, with flag on board of the Wabash. Name of vessel.Name of officer commanding.Battery. WabashCommander C. R. P. Rogers.28 IX-in., 14 Viii-in., 2 X-in. pivots. SusquehannaCaptain J. L. Lardner15 Viii-inch guns. MohicanCommander S. W. Godon2 XI-in. pivots, 4 32-pounders. SeminoleCommander John P. Gillis1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PocahontasCommander Percival Drayton1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PawneeLrifled8913230 4 100-pdrs., rifled 1 Xi-inch shell gun.70 42 Ix-inch shell guns.1,495 ColoradoThatcher1 150-pdr., rifled3140 1 Xi-inch shell gun30 46 Ix-inch shell guns756 WabashSmith1 150-pdr., rifled1540120 42 Ix-inch shell guns1,781 SusquehannaGrodon2 150-pdrs. rifled2153158 12 Ix-inch shell guns643 PowhatanSchenck3 100. pdr., rifledNot given.3197 1 Xl-inch shell gun 14 Ix-inch shell guns JuniataPhelps1 100. pdr., rifled5100 2 30-pdrs.. rifled238 6 Viii-inch shell guns.765
tain F. S., 74 Stellwagen, Commander Henry S., 165, 171 Stephens, Alexander H., address of, 1 et seq., 246 Stettin, the, 80 et seq. Stevens, General I. L, 30, 43, 45 Stevens Lieutenant-Commanding Thomas H., 21, 54, 61, 138 Stimers, Chief-Engineer Alban C., 109 et seq., 138 Stolesbury, Engineer, 213 Stringham, Commodore, 165, 169, 171 Strong, Commander J. H., 81 Stuyvesant, Report of, 143 Sumter, Fort, see Fort Sumter. Sumter, the, U. S. steamer, 7 Susquehanna, the, U. S. vessel, 7, 16, 20 et seq., 23, 27, 32, 166 et seq., 174, 224, 228 Swan, Paymaster, 212 T. Tacony, the, 218, 228, 239 Tatnall, Commodore, Josiah, 19; his defence of Fort Walker, 22 et seq., 47 Taylor, Captain, Wm. Rogers, 77, 81 Terry, General A. H., 129 et seq., 160, 228, 231 et seq., 236 et seq., 241 et seq. Thompson, Colonel, 171 Ticonderoga, the, 222, 228 Toombs, Engineer, 141 Torpedoes, sketch of, 140; success of, 148; facts about, 157 et se
1864. General: I have the honor to forward as complete a field return as is possible at the present time. The most strenuous exertions are being made by me to obtain a full return, but the difficulty in obtaining such from the commanding officer, Department of West Virginia, because of his command covering so great an extent of country, has so far prevented. The enclosed return does not include the cavalry under Averill, about 2,500, or the troops of the Department of Washington, Susquehanna, or Middle. I simply forward it you as a statement showing the number of men for duty south of the Potomac. Hoping soon to furnish complete all reports required, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, P. H. Sheridan, Major-General. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General, United States Army. Field return of troops in the field belonging to the Middle military division, September 10, 1864. Present for duty. troops.officers.Enlisted.aggregate. 6th Army Corps, Infantr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
n out her starboard guns, a flash was seen from the forward one, then a puff of white smoke, a deep boom was heard and over our heads came an eleven inch shell, which I saw distinctly in its passage towards our flag staff, past which it exploded harmlessly with a sharp report. The signal gun had been trailed to bear on an approaching frigate, and as I gave the command the landyard was jerked, and a ten-inch shot went bowling along, richochetted, and bounded through the smoke-stack of the Susquehanna. This was the commencement of the most terrific bombardment from the fleet which war had ever witnessed. Ship after ship discharged its broadsides, every description of deadly missile, from a three-inch rifle bolt to a fifteen-inch shell, flying wildly into and over the fort, until the garrison flagstaff was shattered. Most of the firing seemed directed towards it, and as it stood in the centre of the parade, all these bolts fell harmless as to human life, many of the shells, especia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Events leading up to the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
nd. General Longstreet's Corps was at Chambersburg with the commanding general. General A. P. Hill's Corps was about four miles east of Chambersburg on the road to Gettysburg. General Ewell was then at Carlisle. On the night of the 28th of June I was directed by General Lee to order General Ewell to move directly upon Harrisburg, and to inform him that General Longstreet would move the next morning (the 29th) to his support. General A. P. Hill was directed to move eastward to the 15 Susquehanna, and, crossing the river below Harrisburg, seize the railroad between Harrisburg and Philadelphia, it being supposed that all reinforcements that might be coming from the North would be diverted to the defence of that city, and that there would be such alarm created by these movements that the Federal Government would be obliged to withdraw its army from Virginia and abandon any plan that it might have for an attack upon Richmond. Lee's first information. I sent the orders about 10
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ore eight o'clock. By this desertion General Wool learned that Norfolk was being evacuated, and shortly after 12 o'clock the same day a squadron, composed of the ironclads Monitor and Naugatuck, gunboats Seminole and Dakotah and sloops-of-war Susquehanna and San Jacinto commenced to bombard the batteries at Sewell's Point, which were being dismantled. The Virginia at that time was taking in stores at the navyyard, but as soon as the bombardment commenced she started for the Roads to give ba the Rip-Raps and fired a shot to windward. This was her last challenge. Its historical accuracy can be verified by referring to a telegram of Commodore Goldsborough to President Lincoln, to abstracts from the logs of the Minnesota, Dakotah, Susquehanna, Naugatuck, St. Lawrence and San Jacinto, and to reports of Captain John P. Gillis, of the Seminole, and Lieutenant Constable, of the steamer E. A. Stevens. These reports are to be found on pages 330-1-2-3-4-5. The report, however, which con
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
e Confederacy on the acceptance of his resignation from the United States navy, about May 1, 1861, shortly thereafter taking part in the defense of Fort Hatteras in an attack made by the United States fleet consisting of the Minnesota, Wabash, Susquehanna, Cumberland, Pawnee and Harriett Lane, August 29, 1861. During this engagement he had his arm badly shattered and never fully regained the use of it. He was, as far as I can ascertain, the first Confederate naval officer to be wounded. Heo good service. Fort Clark, then in the possession of the enemy, opened fire also on Hatteras and several land batteries which the enemy had erected on shore. This, with the continuous firing of the fleet composed of the Minnesota, Wabash, Susquehanna and Columbus, pouring a continuous stream of shot and shell. All eyes were turned on the gallant little fort fighting against such desperate odds, amid a perfect hailstorm of shot and shell a boat leaves the fort. What can it mean? My! the
1864. General: I have the honor to forward as complete a field return as is possible at the present time. The most strenuous exertions are being made by me to obtain a full return, but the difficulty in obtaining such from the commanding officer, Department of West Virginia, because of his command covering so great an extent of country, has so far prevented. The enclosed return does not include the cavalry under Averill, about 2,500, or the troops of the Department of Washington, Susquehanna, or Middle. I simply forward it you as a statement showing the number of men for duty south of the Potomac. Hoping soon to furnish complete all reports required, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, P. H. Sheridan, Major-General. Brigadier-General L. Thomas, Adjutant-General, United States Army. Field return of troops in the field belonging to the Middle military division, September 10, 1864. Present for duty. troops.officers.Enlisted.aggregate. 6th Army Corps, Infantr
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
ne spirit untrammelled, unbending one knee! Like the oak of the mountain, deep-rooted and firm, Erect, when the multitude bends to the storm; When traitors to Freedom, and Honor, and God, Are bowed at an Idol polluted with blood; When the recreant North has forgotten her trust, And the lip of her honor is low in the dust,— Thank God, that one arm from the shackle has broken! Thank God, that one man as a freeman has spoken! O'er thy crags, Alleghany, a blast has been blown! Down thy tide, Susquehanna, the murmur has gone! To the land of the South, of the charter and chain, Of Liberty sweetened with Slavery's pain; Where the cant of Democracy dwells on the lips Of the forgers of fetters, and wielders of whips! Where ‘chivalric’ honor means really no more Than scourging of women, and robbing the poor! Where the Moloch of Slavery sitteth on high, And the words which he utters, are—Worship, or die! Right onward, oh, speed it! Wherever the blood Of the wronged and the guiltless is cryi
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