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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
7, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, A9; 171 Vicinity of, 1863 34, 2 McNutt's Hill, La. 155, G2 Fort MacOMBmb, La. 156, D10; 171 Macon, Ga. 69, 5; 70, 1; 76, 1, 76, 2; 101, 21; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135, 4; 135-A; 143, H3; 144, D3; 171 Defenses, 1864 135, 4 Macon, Mo. 160, B10 Macon, Tenn. 135-A; 154, A11 Macon and Western Railroad 51, 2; 57, 1, 57, 3; 60, 1, 60, 2; 69, 5 Macon Fort, N. C. 40, 4; 67, 3; 117, 1; 135-A; 138, H11; 139, A13; 171 Fort McRee, Fla. 110, 1; 135-A; 147, F5; 171 Madison, Ark. 117, 1; 135-A; 154, B8 Madison Court-House, Va. 22, 5; 43, 7; 74, 1; 84, 9; 85, 1; 87, 4; 100, 1 Madisonville, Ky. 135-A; 150, C3; 171 Madisonville, La. 156, C10 Madisonville, Miss. 51, 1; 71, 15; 155, B10 Mad River, Cal. 134, 1 Magnolia, Fla. 146, B10 Magnolia, Md. 81, 4; 100, 1; 116, 2; 136, E10 Magnolia, Tenn. 24, 3; 150, G2 Maine (State) 162-171 Malheur River, Oreg.
om Mexico, Colonel Coffee lived for fifty years a respected and highly-esteemed citizen, and acquired great wealth. Colonel Seibels, like Colonel Coffee, declined to accept public office, preferring to devote himself to private business, in which he was very successful. Tennent Lomax was a splendid specimen of manhood, both physically and intellectually. Though quite young while in Mexico, he was appointed military governor of Orizaba After the Mexican war he engaged in journalism. In 1861 he successfully performed the delicate duty of taking possession of Forts Barrancas and McRee at Pensacola. In April, 1861, he was appointed colonel of the Third Alabama infantry; was highly esteemed as a soldier; was promoted to a brigadier-gen- eralship, but before receiving his commission was killed while gallantly leading his regiment at the battle of Seven Pines. Lieuts. John L. May and William R. King were among the officers from Alabama who were killed in battle during the Mexican war.
lected colonel, Cullen A. Battle, lieutenant-colonel, and Samuel Marks, major. On January 8, 1861, by order of Gov. A. B. Moore, the First regiment was sent against Fort Morgan and the Mount Vernon arsenal, and at the same time the Second regiment was ordered to report at Pensacola to General Chase, commander of Florida troops, and participated in the seizure of the Warrington navy yards and the forts on the Florida coast. The Second regiment captured the navy yard, and Forts Barrancas and McRae on January 10th and 11th, and soon afterward General Chase, Colonel Lomax and Lieutenant-Colonel Battle telegraphed to Senator Jefferson Davis, at Washington, for advice as to the propriety of an attack upon Fort Pickens, and received the reply: In the present condition of affairs Pickens is not worth one drop of blood. Not long after this the Alabama legislature passed the ordinance of secession, and at the same time annulled all military commissions previously issued above the rank of cap
f the State, and others, raised under special authority, reported directly to the war department. These two regiments, Ninth and Tenth, served in camp and at Fort McRee during the Confederate occupancy of Pensacola, and participated in the night attack upon Billy Wilson's Zouaves on Santa Rosa Island, October 8, 1861. This expaffair. On November 22d and 23d, the Mississippians, with the other troops, were under the forty hours bombardment from Fort Pickens and the sand batteries. Fort McRee suffered mostly in this fiery trial, and the Mississippians there, under Col. John B. Villepigue, with their Georgia comrades, made a gallant defense which elic, Colonel Jones was put in command at Pensacola, preparations having been made to evacuate the city. The Twenty-seventh Mississippi, which had been assigned to Fort McRee and adjacent batteries and had been distinguished for coolness and gallantry, was the last to leave the Florida post. The Third Mississippi, Col. J. B. Deaso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
major), April 30, 1849, and resigned February 25, 1861. From the date of his appointment as assistant surgeon he was on active duty at Fort Leavenworth, Fort Des Moines, Fort Gibson, Mo., Fort Coffee, Kan., and numerous forts in Florida, until in 1843 he was stationed at camp Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, where he became acquainted with his future wife, her father being in command of a detail of the Seventh Regiment of United States Infantry, occupying the harbor defences—Forts Pickens and McRae. In the August after his marriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement to the Rio Grande, and commencement of the Mexican war. For two years he was at Carmago, on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. Having attained his promotion as surgeon at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., he was ordered to duty with the troops which went as advance guard across the plains before the great emigration of 1849, and was en r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dr. Samuel P. Moore. (search)
major), April 30, 1849, and resigned February 25, 1861. From the date of his appointment as assistant surgeon he was on active duty at Fort Leavenworth, Fort Des Moines, Fort Gibson, Mo., Fort Coffee, Kan., and numerous forts in Florida, until in 1843 he was stationed at camp Barrancas, Pensacola harbor, where he became acquainted with his future wife, her father being in command of a detail of the Seventh Regiment of United States Infantry, occupying the harbor defences—Forts Pickens and McRae. In the August after his marriage he accompanied his command to Aransas and Corpus Christi, on the Texas boundary, the Neuces river, preparatory to the movement to the Rio Grande, and commencement of the Mexican war. For two years he was at Carmago, on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. Having attained his promotion as surgeon at Jefferson Barracks, Mo., he was ordered to duty with the troops which went as advance guard across the plains before the great emigration of 1849, and was en r
rt Livingston, La., VI., 314. Fort Lyon, Va., V., 85. Fort McAllister, Ga.: I., 35, 42, 80 seq.; III., 225, 226, 227, 229, 231, 233, 235, 236, 340; guns at, V., 263; VI., 121, 236, 241, 272, 316, 318; where Sherman's march, ended, VIII., 219; signalling from, VIII., 334, 335; IX., 169. Fort McGilvery, Va.: III., 206; V., 213. Fort McHenry, Chesapeake Bay, Md. : VII., 38, 56, 198. Fort Macon, N. C.: I., 262; IX., 69. Fort McPherson, Va., V., 102. Fort McRee, Fla.: I., 347, 354; V., 57; VIII., 196, 107; Confederate drill in, VIII., 156, 157. Fort Magruder, Va.: I., 268, 270-272; V., 31. Fort Mahone, Va.: III., 293, 205, 271, 279, 289, 290, 336; V., 215; dead in trenches, IX., 191. Fort Mannahasset, Tex., VI., 322. Fort Marcy, Va.: V., 85; N. Y. Fourth Artillery at, V., 97; its armament, V., 97; VIII., 88. Fort Marion, St. Augustine, Fla. : II., 347, 349; bastions of, II., 351. Fort Meikle, Va., III., 207.
ail, J. L., VII., 200. McPherson, J. B.: I., 33; II., 160, 199, 212, 216, 218, 334, 341; III., 101, 106, 108, 109, 113, 120, 124, 131, 132, 134, 221, 224, 318, 320, 322, 326, 328; V., 46; VIII., 240; X., 129, 168. McPherson Hospital, Vicksburg, Miss. , VII., 233. McPherson's Woods, Pa.: II., 241, 243, 244; IX., 223. McRae, D., X., 259. McRae, D. K.: I., 272; brigade of, II., 67. McRae, W., X., 281. McRae,, C. S. S.: I., 219; VI., 192, 193, 204, 218. McRee, Fort, battery north of Pensacola, Fla., VIII., 107. Madill, H. J., X., 303. Madison, J., I., 17. Madison, surgeon, VII., 222. Madison Court House, Va., IV., 96. Maffit, E., VI., 301. Maffit, J. N., VI., 291, 293. Maffit's channel, S. C., VI., 312. Magee, S., VIII., 281. Maggofin, escape from Alton prison, VII., 144. Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, S. C. , IX., 274, 277. Magruder, J. B.: headquarters of, Yorktown, Va., I., 261, 2
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
orders of the Chesapeake; Fort Macon in North Carolina; Forts Moultrie and Sumter in the bay of Charleston, South Carolina; Fort Pulaski in Georgia, near Savannah; Forts Key West and Garden Key on two small islands at the extremity of Florida; Forts McRae and Pickens at the entrance of the bay of Pensacola in the same State; Forts Morgan and Gaines in front of Mobile, in Alabama; and Forts Jackson and St. Philip on the Mississippi, below New Orleans. The garrisons of these forts had been so muf North Carolina and Florida. A few militia troops of the latter State assembled at Pensacola; the commandant of the arsenal allowed himself to be captured by them on the 12th, but an energetic officer, Lieutenant Slemmer, was in command of Forts McRae and Pickens. Not being able to defend both with a handful of men, he followed the example of Anderson, eluded the vigilance of the enemy who was watching him, and abandoned the first to retire into the second, which was thus wrested for ever
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
e offensive; and as his soldiers were too few in number to make a sortie, it was necessary that the fort itself should take part in the combat. Secession, as we have stated, had divided the line of defences at Pensacola into two parts, giving Fort McRae, on the west side of the inlet, to the Confederates, and leaving Fort Pickens, on the east side, in possession of the Federals. These two Forts—guardians of the harbor—constructed with a view to their mutual support, belonged therefore to the ces which the arsenal of Pensacola afforded them. The frigate Niagara and the sloop-of-war Richmond, charged with the blockade on the Florida coast, took part in the bombardment, which was opened by Fort Pickens on the morning of November 22d. Fort McRae replied, and was supported by the fire of several field-batteries erected in the vicinity of the arsenal. The cannonading was thus kept up for two days without producing any result. There were twelve or fifteen men disabled on both sides. Th
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