Your search returned 265 results in 94 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
n, a name now familiar to every reader. On the south side of the Junction is Broad Run, a stream quite as large as Bull Run. On the east side is the Occoquan River, formed by the confluence of Broad Run and Cedar Run, and receiving Bull Run as a tributary. Now, between these three streams, and thus protected by themver, will not arrive until a strong force shall have been sent down the Potomac from Washington, or brought up the Potomac by sea, and landed at the mouth of the Occoquan, within ten miles of the enemy's right flank, and at Dumfries, within twenty miles of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, the channel through which he procures athe first aim should be to render the Capital secure, by adequately guarding the Potomac. That, retain order, formidable forces should be landed at or near Occoquan and Dumfries, and supported at those points by armed vessels, while entrenching themselves there, preparatory to a forward movement. That this movement shou
New plan of Campaign. Raymond, whose military genius has hitherto been chiefly displayed in practical illustrations in the art of retreating, which is said to require even greater skill that of advancing, is recommending in his paper that no farther attack be made upon Manassas; but that a strong force be landed upon the Potomac, as the mouth of the Occoquan, within ten miles of the Confederate right flank, and at Dumfries, within twenty miles of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, so as to turn our position at Manassas, and cut off the retreat of our army, whilst Banks' column should move simultaneously, &c. That is seems that, after all Gen. McClellan's warnings to the press, they will not hold their tongues. When a civilian obtains a little knowledge of military matters, it is impossible to make him keep the peace Nevertheless, leaky vessels may be of service to somebody. Our Generals will, no doubt, be ready for any movement of the enemy is any direction, whether by D
t, I took post to the left of my reserve. Of the topographical features of the country thus occupied, it must suffice to say that Bull Run is a small stream, running, in this locality, nearly from west to east, to its confluence with the Occoquan River, about twelve miles from the Potomac, and draining a considerable scope of country from its source in Bull Run mountain to a short distance of the Potomac, at Occoquan. At this season habitually low and sluggish, it is however rapidly and frOccoquan. At this season habitually low and sluggish, it is however rapidly and frequently swollen by the summer rains until unfordable. The backs for the most part are rocky and steep, but abound in long used fords. The country on either side, much broken and thickly wooded, becomes gently rolling and open as it recedes from the stream. On the northern side the ground is much the highest, and commands the other bank completely. Roads traverse and intersect the surrounding country in almost every direction. Finally, at Mitchell's ford the stream is about equidistant betw
line. On Friday, one thousand Mississipians, as a guard, reached the vicinity of Fairfax Court-House, with sixty pieces of artillery. The force opposite Washington is estimated by the Confederates at one hundred and twenty-five thousand, with heavy reinforcements daily arriving. They say an attack is to be made on Washington the present week. Simultaneously with the attack on Washington demonstrations are to be made (according to the same authority) below, near the mouth of the Occoquan, and above, and at Edwards', Nolan's, or the White House Ferry. "important from North Carolina." Our North Carolina friends will read the following Federal assertions with surprise: Washington, Sept. 5.--Respectable gentlemen who have arrived here from North Carolina, by a circuitous route, say that the Union prospects in that State are of the most encouraging character. The acting Governor is a reliable Union man. Secret leagues of loyal citizens exist in every county, whic
The enemy at Occoquan. The War Department received a dispatch yesterday, stating that the enemy had crossed the Potomac at Occoquan in strong force, for the purpose of capturing one of our batteries — perhaps the one located near Evansport. As they have no acquaintance with the country, it is believed that they will be cut off and forced to surrender. The enemy at Occoquan. The War Department received a dispatch yesterday, stating that the enemy had crossed the Potomac at Occoquan in strong force, for the purpose of capturing one of our batteries — perhaps the one located near Evansport. As they have no acquaintance with the country, it is believed that they will be cut off and forced to surrende
fell a distance of fifteen feet to the lower deck, escaping, however, with only a sprained ankle. The Delaware (her officers say) supposed we were laying at anchor, and bore away towards us to speak us, and endeavored to cross our bow, and at the same time the Planet endeavored to keep away from her by putting the helm to port, and blowing the whistle to notify the approaching steamer that we were under way, and intended to go to the right of her, according to law. The Delaware struck us when under full headway, she having barely stopped her engine when she struck us. The Planet sunk in ten minutes after she was struck, in five fathoms water. We had barely time to escape with our lives, and saved nothing, only what we had on. We remained on board the Delaware all night, and arrived at Washington city at 12 m. on Thursday, after being fired at on our return by the rebels at Occoquan. They fired several shots at the Delaware, some of which crossed her deck, but none struck her.
ral soldiers at Occoquan, Prince William county. We have information that our military started from Fredericksburg, and that Col. Ransom, of North Carolina marched thirteen miles with his command, with a view of driving back the enemy, when a courier met them with intelligence that there was no enemy to attack; that a small reconnoitering party had crossed the river, and returned after a brief sojourn. On learning these facts, our forces relinquished the expedition. So much for the great Occoquan excitement. The news of Gen. Jackson's victory on Greenbrier river is confirmed. The enemy has been strongly entrenched and fortified on the top of Cheat Mountain, and our troops, considering is hopeless to attack such a position, have tried every means to get the Federalists out, but they persistently refused to accept the challenge. It is probable that Gen. Reynolds designed to surprise Gen. Jackson's command when he made the attack on the 2d inst. At daylight on the morning of th
ky cavalry regiment is still without an officially recognized Colonel. A petition is in circulation recommending Lieut. Colonel Owens for the command. Prince Salm Salm was sometime ago appointed, but at his own request a change has been made, and he is now attached to General Blenker's staff. It is satisfactorily ascertained that the rebels have not lately sent any of their forces to the Upper Potomac. They have merely retired further back into Virginia. Their lines extend from Occoquan and Manassa to Fairfax C. H. Manassa obviously being their base of operations. The friends of Ex-Mayor Berret say he has gone to New York, purposing to reside there during the continuance of the present troubles. Affairs at New York. New York, Oct. 1. --It is known that a large quantity of cotton has arrived here from the Eastern States recently for shipment to Europe. It now appears that the brokers have been engaged in sending our fine staples abroad, receiving in retur
The Daily Dispatch: October 14, 1861., [Electronic resource], The danger of rebellion in the North! (search)
auregard about? --This question is the ruling topic of the day. It puzzles military critics, and politicians who can see through a millstone. The general idea is that Beauregard is falling back again to repeat the old ruse of Bull Run. But that trick is played out. Then, again, it is supposed that the rebel army of the Potomac is undergoing a division into two grand columns — the one to ford the river above the Great Falls, and the other to ferry it below Washington, somewhere between Occoquan and Matthias Point. But as this plan of operations would, if seriously attempted, almost certainly result in the destruction or capture of both these columns, we have no idea that it will be tried. But, again, it is supposed that Beauregard is falling back in order to send a heavy detachment of his troops into Kentucky, to capture that State and its vast army supplies before Gen. Anderson is strong enough to resist a body of twenty or thirty thousand men. This is a plausible conjecture, a
, and another," as the reports reverberated through the air in quick succession. Every moment the firing increased, until the sounds run into each other, producing a continuous roar. "They are rolling ten-pins down on the river," said I. "And there's a ten-stroke!" was the reply, as a Columbiad belched forth its contents, and shook the hills with its tremendous report. "Shall we go down?" "Agreed!" Ten minutes later saw us in the saddle galloping over the highway to Occoquan. The morning was very wet and disagreeable. The rain of the night previous had put the roads in a navigable condition, and although the mud was deep enough to float a Mississippi flat-boat we concluded it fordable, and pushed on. Dark masses of clouds hung in the sky and at times turned up their watering-pots and sprinkled us, as gardeners do their growing vegetables, until chased away by the sunshine. Between sunshine and shower, beneath giant elms, through oak forests, by dark pere
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10