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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 27, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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tering eyes, Keep guard, for the army is sleeping. There's only the sound of the lone sentry's tread, As he tramps from the rock to the fountain, And thinks of the two in the low trundle-bed Far away in the cot on the mountain. His musket falls slack; his face, dark and grim, Grows gentle with memories tender, As he mutters a prayer for the children asleep— For their mother—may Heaven defend her! All quiet along the Potomac: a civil-war sentry on his beat This Union picket by the Potomac River bank, clasping his musket in the chilling blast as he tramps his beat, conjures up the original of Ethel Beers' historic poem. The sympathy of the poet was not misplaced. Picket duty was an experience in every soldier's life. Regiments were detailed at stated intervals to march from their camps to the outer lines and there disposition would be made of the men in the following order: about one half of the regiment would be placed in what was known as the ‘reserve,’ while the balance o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
range. Thus, General Kelly had captured Romney, the county seat of Hampshire, forty miles west of Winchester, and now occupied it with a force of 5,000 men. Rosecrans' testimony before Committee on the conduct of the war, volume III, 1865, page 14. This movement gave the Federals control of the fertile valley of the south branch of the Potomac. Another, though much smaller force, occupied Bath, the county seat of Morgan, forty miles due north of Winchester, while the north bank of the Potomac was everywhere guarded by Union troops. The Baltimore and Ohio railroad was open and available for the supply of the Federal troops from Baltimore to Harper's Ferry, and again from a point opposite Hancock westward. The section of this road of about forty miles from Harper's Ferry to Hancock, lying for the most part some distance within the Virginia border, had been interrupted and rendered useless by the Confederates, but this gap was now supplied by the Chesapeake and Ohio canal, which
e storm, which greatly embarrassed our movements. The rear of the column did not leave its position near Gettysburg until after daylight on the 5th. The march was continued during that day without interruption by the enemy, except an unimportant demonstration upon our rear in the afternoon, when near Fairfield, which was easily checked. The army, after a tedious march rendered more difficult by the rains, reached Hagerstown on the afternoon of the 6th and morning of the 7th of July. The Potomac was so much swollen by the rains that had fallen almost incessantly since our army entered Maryland, as to be unfordable. A pontoon train had been sent from Richmond, but the rise in the river gave to it a width greater than was expected, so that additional boats had to be made by the army on its retreat. Our communication with the south side was thus interrupted, and it was found difficult to procure either ammunition or subsistence, the latter difficulty being enhanced by the high wat
r on the 19th, when he began to retreat, and was pursued with much loss, until he was disposed of by taking the route to the Kanawha River. On the 27th Early's force reached Staunton on its march down the Valley. It now amounted to ten thousand infantry and about two thousand cavalry, having been joined by Breckinridge and by Colonel Bradley T. Johnson, with a battalion of Maryland cavalry. The advance was rapid. Railroad bridges were burned, the track destroyed, and stores captured. The Potomac was crossed on June 5th and 6th, and the move was made through the gaps of South Mountain to the north of Maryland Heights, which were occupied by a hostile force. A brigade of cavalry was sent north of Frederick to strike the railroads from Baltimore to Harrisburg and Philadelphia, burn the bridges over the Gunpowder, and to cut the railroad between Washington and Baltimore, and threaten the latter place. The other troops moved forward toward Monocacy Junction, where a considerable bod
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blockade. (search)
mbarded Stonington (q. v.), but was repulsed. His squadron lay off the mouth of the Thames when the news of peace came. See New London. In the opening months of the Civil War, the Confederates planted cannon on the Virginia shores of the Potomac River, at various pints, to interrupt the navigation. One of these redoubts was at Matthias Point, a bold promontory in King George county, Va., and commanded the river a short time. The point was heavily wooded. Capt. J. H. Ward, with his flag- North Carolina, it lay in state, and was then taken to Hartford, where imposing funeral ceremonies were performed in the Roman Catholic cathedral. In September, 1861, General McClellan was ordered to co-operate with the naval force on the Potomac River in removing the blockade, but he failed to do so; and it was kept up until the Confederates voluntarily abandoned their position in front of Washington in 1862. See Charleston, S. C.; Mobile, Ala.; Savannah, Ga.; Wilmington, N. C. On Apri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
n 1804, he was actively engaged in the promotion of both projects. The Western canal was never completed, according to its original conception, but was supplemented by the great Erie Canal, suggested by Gouverneur Morris about 1801. In a letter to David Parish, of Philadelphia, that year. he distinctly foreshadowed that great work. As early as 1774 Washington favored the passage of a law by the legislature of Virginia for the construction of works—canals and good wagonroads—by which the Potomac and Ohio rivers might be connected by a chain of commerce. After the Revolution, the States of Virginia and Maryland took measures which resulted in the formation of the famous Potomac Company, to carry out Washington's project. In 1784 Washington revived a project for making a canal through the Dismal Swamp, not only for drainage, but for navigation between the Elizabeth River and Albemarle Sound. The oldest work of the kind in the United States is a canal, begun in 1792, 5 miles in e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frederick, Fort (search)
Frederick, Fort A protective work on the north bank of the Potomac River in Maryland, 50 miles below Fort Cumberland; erected in 1755-56.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
good fashion and 300 laboringmen (so Lord Baltimore wrote to Wentworth), sailed from Cowes, Isle of Wight, in two vessels, the Ark and Dove, accompanied by two Jesuit priests, Andrew White and John Altham. The Calverts and the other gentlemen, and some of the laboring-men, were Roman Catholics, but a greater portion of the latter were Protestants. After a terribly tempestuous voyage, in which the vessels were separated, they met at Barbadoes and finally entered the broad mouth of the Potomac River, in February, 1634. They sailed up the Potomac, and upon Blackstone Island (which they named St. Clement's) they landed, performed religious ceremonies, and were visited by the wondering natives. The governor made further explorations, and, finally, on March 27 (O. S.), Calvert, having entered into a treaty for the purchase of a domain on a pleasant little river, determined there to plant a settlement. With imposing religious ceremonies it was dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Napier, Sir Charles 1786-1860 (search)
Napier, Sir Charles 1786-1860 Naval officer; born in Stirlingshire, Scotland, March 6, 1786; joined the British navy in 1799; promoted lieutenant and assigned to duty against the French in the West Indies in 1805. He was ordered to the North American fleet on Lake Champlain in 1813; served on the Potomac River in August, 1814; and commanded the long-boats in the actions before Baltimore. He died in London, Nov. 8, 1860.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Quint, Alonzo Hall 1828- (search)
Quint, Alonzo Hall 1828- Clergyman; born in Barnsley, N. H., Nov. 22, 1828; graduated at Dartmouth in 1864; pastor of Mather Church in Roxbury, Mass., 1858; chaplain of the 2d Massachusetts Infantry in 1861; elected to the State legislature in 1881. Among his writings are The Potomac and the Rapidan; The record of the 2d Massachusetts Infantry; The first parish in Dover, N. H., etc.
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