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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
ed in and credited. At a meeting held on the 8th of September, it was voted to pay the same amount of bounty to volunteers who enlist, and are credited, in the nine months service; and on the 15th of November the selectmen were authorized to pay the same amount of money to men who may be drafted, belonging to the town. 1863. At the town-meeting held on the 11th of April, it was voted to raise one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers; and on the 13th of November the selectmen were directed to continue the payment of State aid to the families of deceased soldiers. 1864. At a meeting held on the 28th of March, the chairman of the selectmen was directed to go to Boston and ascertain if the quota of the town on the previous calls had been filled ; and that he be authorized to secure volunteers to fill all calls up to the present time, if they can be obtained at a reasonable rate. On the 6th of June the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 20: to Falmouth, in pursuit of Lee. Burnside supersedes McClellan. (search)
nside assumed command immediately and the army was reorganized in three grand divisions, the right being commanded by Gen. Sumner and consisting of his own Second Corps; Gen. O. O. Howard commanding the Second Division and Col. Norman J. Hall, of the Seventh Michigan, the Third Brigade, which, in addition to the four regiments which had so long served together had been strengthened by the addition of the Fifty-Ninth New York, and One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Pennsylvania regiments. On Nov. 13 Division drill was held and it was a grand spectacle, there being nearly 6,000 troops on the field at one time. For some reason, Burnside abandoned McClellan's plan of operations, which the latter had fully explained to him, and started rapidly down the Rappahannock toward Fredericksburg on Nov. 15. This gave Jackson an opportunity to join Lee, who, as a result, was well prepared for any move of Burnside against him. A march of 14 miles was made on the first day. After leaving Warren
ssell, discharged. Co. B.Capt. Henry A. Hale, absent, severely wounded Sept. 17. First Lieut. Elisha A. Hinks, in command of company—transferred from Co. E. Second Lieut. Moses Shackley, promoted from Sergt. Co. B to be 2nd Lieut. to date Nov. 13, vice Newcomb, promoted. Co. C.Second Lieut. Chas. P. Abbott, on detached service 3d Brig. staff. Promoted from Sergt. Co. B to date Sept. 18, vice Mumford, promoted. Co. D.Capt. Moncena Dunn, absent, wounded Dec. 13. First Lieut. J. G. C. D. O. Dec. 15 to date Dec. 12. (This office was not again filled.) First Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb, died Dec.20, 1862, at Falmouth, Va., from wounds received at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, promoted from Second Lieutenant to First Lieutenant, to date Nov. 13, vice Thorndike discharged. Second Lieut. Thomas Claffey, killed in action December 13. The following enlisted men had been transferred to the regular army. Private Patrick Kelly, F, Oct. 23, 1862 to Batt. A., 4th U. S. Arty. Private
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
eb. 20, ‘64; 22; rejected Mar. 3, ‘64. Chick, Wm. H., priv., (H), Dec. 10, ‘61; 23; N. F.R. Choate, Elisha, priv., (F), Nov. 13, ‘63; 41; wounded May 6, ‘64; M. O. June 30, ‘65; abs. Sick disch. July 21, ‘65. Christy, Wm. J., priv., (E), May 21, 2, ‘64; not heard from since; on M. O. roll as Henry P. Kneeland, Geo. E., priv., (C), Sept. 10, ‘61; 28; disch. disa. Nov. 13, ‘62. Kneeland, Noah R., priv., (B), July 26, ‘61; 20; M. O. Aug. 28, ‘64. Knight, Cyrus, wagoner, (I), July 26, ‘61; isa. Sept. 23, ‘62; see also Co. K 2nd H. Art'y. Shackley, Moses, wagoner, (B), Aug. 24, ‘61; 21; 1st sergt.; 2nd Lieut. Nov. 13, ‘62; disch. Nov. 12, ‘63. Shackley, Wm., priv., (H), Dec. 9, ‘61; 26; disch. disa. Aug. 9, ‘62; see also V. R.C. ShaM., 1st lieut., (F and G), Aug. 3, ‘61; 50; disch. disa. Sept. 17, ‘62. Shea, John, priv., (G), July 25, ‘61; 22; died Nov. 13, ‘62, Bolivar, Va. Sheahan, Edward, priv., (I), Aug. 19, ‘61; 19; disch. disa
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 27: Chattanooga and the battle of Missionary Ridge (search)
rs who were present. While he was speaking the Confederates made themselves heard by an occasional shell from Lookout Mountain. The Thirty-third Massachusetts band came near and, as soon as the service was over, struck up some familiar hymns and airs that were sweet and cheering. As I went through the hospital afterwards, I asked the men --ill and wounded — if they liked the music. Oh, yes; I wish they would play often, was the burden of the responses. Sherman marched rapidly. By November 13th his advance had reached Bridgeport. He had already obtained the further orders to keep in motion until he found himself in the vicinity of Chattanooga. As soon as he reached that point, Grant requested him to have his troops close up and come on as fast as the bad roads would permit, but hasten in person for an interview and consultation at Chattanooga. Grant was already there. Sherman arrived the evening of the 14th. Several officers and I among them were present with Grant when
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 40: return to Atlanta; the March to the sea; Battle of Griswoldville, ga. (search)
tages for the very purpose of rest and refreshment after the 300 miles of severe additional campaigning. November 3d I encamped near Dallas. The 4th we were grouped near Lost Mountain, where it was easier to lose your way from the thick woods and crooked roads than to lose sight of the mountain. In fact, the mountain, unaccountably named Lost, enabled a wanderer to refind his pathway. The 5th brought the Army of the Tennessee back to Smyrna Camp Ground. There we remained until November 13th. General Sherman himself, as early as November 2d, had changed his headquarter belongings again to the little hamlet of Kingstown, Ga. From this point that same day was the significant dispatch to Grant: If I turn back, the whole effect of my campaign will be lost.... I am clearly of the opinion that the best results will follow my contemplated movement through Georgia. Grant's reply is: Your dispatch of 9 A. M. yesterday just received. ... I do not see that you can withdraw from w
as white as snow, with the softest fur, a perfect bunch of loving-kindness, all purr and felicity. I had a good audience last evening, and enjoyed it. My audiences, considering the horse disease and the rains, are amazing. And how they do laugh! We get into regular gales. E. has the real country minister turn-out: horse and buggy, and such a nice horse too. The baby is a beauty, and giggles, and goos, and shouts inquiries with the rising inflection, in the most inspiring manner. November 13. Wakefield. I read in Haverhill last night. It was as usual stormy. I had a good audience, but not springy and inspiriting like that at Waltham. Some audiences seem to put spring into one, and some to take it out. This one seemed good but heavy. I had to lift them, while in Framingham and Waltham they lifted me. The Lord bless and keep you. It grieves me to think you are dull and I not with you. By and by we will be together and stay together. Good-by dear. Your ever loving w
November 13. Wakefield. I read in Haverhill last night. It was as usual stormy. I had a good audience, but not springy and inspiriting like that at Waltham. Some audiences seem to put spring into one, and some to take it out. This one seemed good but heavy. I had to lift them, while in Framingham and Waltham they lifted me. The Lord bless and keep you. It grieves me to think you are dull and I not with you. By and by we will be together and stay together. Good-by dear. Your ever loving wife, H. B. S.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
Stanton, if the Society will cross the Rubicon, (if they knew it they have crossed it already), I will answer with my head for their success. The line forms on the other side—whoever don't report himself there, will be out of the victory. Thine from the bottom, E. Wright, Jr. This candid utterance produced the sensation, in both camps, which Mr. Garrison anticipated, and proved an invaluable weapon in his hands. In the meantime, however, a local anti-slavery convention held on November 13 and 14, in Warsaw, Genesee County, N. Y., under the Life of M. Holley, p. 256. very eye and hand of Myron Holley, resolved that every motive of duty and expediency which ought to control the action of a Christian freeman, required the abolitionists of the United States to organize an independent political party; and proceeded to tender the nominations of President and Vice-President to James G. Birney, of New York, and Francis Julius Le Moyne, Of French and Scotch-Irish parentage, Dr.
ere troops for the Confederacy were being recruited. On November 14, camp was broken at Snow Hill and the battery marched sixteen miles to Newtown, Md., where it joined the larger body of troops under General Lockwood. The whole force now consisted of detachments from the 4th Wisconsin, 21st Indiana, 6th Michigan, 5th New York, 2d Delaware, Pursell's Legion of Maryland, 17th Massachusetts, Richard's Cavalry and the 2d Massachusetts Light Battery all in command of General Lockwood. November 13, General Dix had issued a proclamation See Off. Records, Vol. 5, p. 431. to the inhabitants of Accomac and Northampton counties, Virginia, urging them to peace and loyalty. To enforce this proclamation General Lockwood with his brigade left Newtown and went by way of Drummondtown and Belleville to Eastville toward the end of the peninsula. The battery arrived at Drummondtown, November 21. This was Thanksgiving Day and we read, Poultry very plenty on the way. Bought (?) two turkeys
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