hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 257 results in 222 document sections:

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Humphreys, David 1752-1818 (search)
Humphreys, David 1752-1818 Military officer; born in Derby, Conn., July 10, 1752; graduated at Yale College in 1771, and was for a short time tutor in the family of Colonel Phillipse, of Phillipse Manor, N. Y. He entered the army as captain early in the Revolutionary War, and in October, 1777, was major of a brigade. He was aide to General Putnam in 1778, David Humphreys. and early in 1780 was made aide to Washington. Having distinguished himself at Yorktown, he was made the bearer of the captured British standards to Congress, when that body voted him an elegant sword. At the close of the war he accompanied Washington to Mount Vernon, and in July, 1784, went to France as secretary of legation to Jefferson, accompanied by Kosciuszko. In 1787 he was appointed colonel of a regiment for the Western service, but when it was reduced, in 1788, he again went to Mount Vernon, where he remained with Washington until sent as minister to Portugal in 1790. He was master of ceremonies i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hutchings, William 1764- (search)
onstruction of Fort George, on the peninsula. After the destruction of the British fleet, his father, who refused to take the oath of allegiance to the crown, retired to New Castle, where he remained until the close of the war. At the age of fifteen, having acquired a man's stature, William entered the Continental army. He enlisted in a regiment of Massachusetts militia commanded by Col. Samuel McCobb, Capt. Benjamin Lemont's company, as a volunteer for six months. That was in the spring of 1780 or 1781; and he was honorably discharged about Christmas, the same year, at Cox's Head, at the mouth of the Kennebec River. He received an annual pension of $21.60 until 1865, when an annual gratuity of $300 was granted by Congress to each of the five Revolutionary soldiers then supposed to be living. Only four of the number lived to receive this gratuity. William Hutchings and Lemuel Cook were the last. In 1865, when over 100 years of age, he received an invitation from the city auth
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hutchinson, Thomas 1711-1780 (search)
Hutchinson, Thomas 1711-1780 Royal governor; born in Boston, Sept. 9, 1711; graduated at Harvard College in 1727, and, after engaging unsuccessfully in commerce, studied law, and began its practice in Boston. That city sent him to London as its agent in important business; and he represented it in the general court for ten years. In 1752 he was chosen judge of probate; was a councillor from 1749 to 1766; was lieutenant-governor from 1758 to 1771; and was made chief-justice Thomas Hutchinson of the province in 1768. At that time he held four high offices under the King's appointment, and he naturally sided with the crown in the rising disputes, and became very obnoxious to the republicans. When, in 1769, Governor Bernard was recalled, Hutchinson became acting-governor of Massachusetts, and was commissioned governor in 1771. He was continually engaged in controversies with the popular Assembly, and often with his council. The publication of some of his letters (1773), whic
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingersoll, Jared 1749-1781 (search)
Ingersoll, Jared 1749-1781 Born in Milford, Conn., in 1722; graduated at Yale in 1742; was stamp agent in 1765. He was obliged to reship the stamps he had received and to resign his office. He is the author of The Stamp act. He died in New Haven, Conn., in August, 1781. Jurist; born in Connecticut in 1749; graduated at Yale in 1766; studied law in London; returned to Philadelphia in 1771; was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1780; a member of the Constitutional convention in 1787; and was the Federal candidate for the Vice-Presidency in 1812, but was defeated, receiving 86 electoral votes. He died in Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1822.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingersoll, Robert Green 1833- (search)
first, Lincoln the last. Paine, of all others, succeeded in getting aid for the struggling colonies from France. According to Lamartine, the King, Louis XVI., loaded Paine with favors, and a gift of six millions was confided into the hands of Franklin and Paine. On Aug. 25, 1781, Paine reached Boston, bringing 2,500,000 livres in silver, and in convoy a ship laden with clothing and military stores. In November, 1779, Paine was elected clerk to the General Assembly of Pennsylvania. In 1780, the Assembly received a letter from General Washington in the field, saying that he feared the distresses in the army would lead to mutiny in the ranks. This letter was read by Paine to the Assembly. He immediately wrote to Blair McClenaghan, a Philadelphia merchant, explaining the urgency, and enclosing $500, the amount of salary due him as clerk, as his contribution towards a relief fund. The merchant called a meeting the next day, and read Paine's letter. A subscription list was immed
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, Ralph (search)
Izard, Ralph Statesman; born near Charleston, S. C., in 1742; was educated at Cambridge, England, and in 1767 married a daughter of Peter De Lancey, of New York. They spent some time in Europe, and Mr. Izard was appointed by Congress commissioner to the Court of the Grand Duke of Tuscany, and resided in Paris, where he took sides with Arthur Lee against Silas Deane and Franklin (see Deane, Silas). He returned home in 1780; procured for General Greene the command of the Southern army, and pledged his large estates for the purchase of ships-of-war in Europe. He was in Congress in 1781-83, and in the United States Senate in 1789-95. Two years afterwards he was prostrated by paralysis. His intellect was spared, and he lived in comparative comfort about eight years, without pain, when a second shock ended his life, May 30, 1804.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, William 1759-1828 (search)
Jackson, William 1759-1828 Military officer; born in Cumberland, England, March 9, 1759; was taken to Charleston, S. C., an orphan, at an early age; at the breaking out of the Revolutionary War he entered the military service. He finally became aide to General Lincoln, and was made a prisoner at Charleston in 1780. He was secretary to Col. John Laurens, special minister to France, and was in Washington's military family as aide, with the rank of major. Jackson was assistant Secretary of War under Washington, and was secretary to the convention that framed the national Constitution in 1787. From 1789 to 1792 he was aide and private secretary to President Washington; from 1796 to 1801 was surveyor of the port of Philadelphia, and was secretary to the General Society of the Cincinnati. He died in Philadelphia, Dec. 17, 1828.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jefferson, Fort (search)
Jefferson, Fort A fortification built by Col. George Rogers Clark (q. v.), on the west side of the Mississippi. He had designed to extend his invasion to Detroit, but troops to reinforce him had been added to the force of another bold leader (see Shelby, Evan), and he had to abandon the undertaking. Jefferson, then governor of Virginia, gave instructions for the occupation of a station on the Mississippi River between the mouth of the Ohio and the parallel of 36° 30′; and in the spring of 1780 Clarke chose a strong position 5 miles below the mouth of the Ohio, whereon he built Fort Jefferson. Here the Americans planted their first sentinel to watch over the freedom of the navigation of the Father of wate
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, Sir John 1742- (search)
Johnson, Sir John 1742- Military officer; born in Mount Johnson, N. Y., Nov. 5, 1742; son of Sir William Johnson; was a stanch loyalist, and in 1776 the Whigs tried to get possession of his person. He fled to Canada with about 700 followers, where he was commissioned a colonel, and raised a corps chiefly among the loyalists of New York, known as the Royal Greens. He was among the most active and bitter foes of the patriots. While investing Fort Stanwix in 1777, he defeated General Herkimer at Oriskany, but was defeated himself by General Van Rensselaer in 1780. After the war Sir John went to England, but returned to Canada, where he resided as superintendent of Indian affairs until his death, in Montreal, Jan. 4, 1830. He married a daughter of John Watts, a New York loyalist.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnston, William 1780- (search)
Johnston, William 1780- Revolutionist; born in Canada, in 1780; was an American spy on the Canada frontier during the War of 1812-15. He was living at Clayton, N. Y., on the bank of the St. Lawrence, when the patriot war in Canada broke out in 1837. Being a bold and adventurous man, and cordially hating the British, Johnston was easily persuaded by the American sympathizers in the movement to join in the strife. The leaders regarded him as a valuable assistant, for he was thoroughly acqu1780; was an American spy on the Canada frontier during the War of 1812-15. He was living at Clayton, N. Y., on the bank of the St. Lawrence, when the patriot war in Canada broke out in 1837. Being a bold and adventurous man, and cordially hating the British, Johnston was easily persuaded by the American sympathizers in the movement to join in the strife. The leaders regarded him as a valuable assistant, for he was thoroughly acquainted with the whole region of the Thousand Islands, in the St. Lawrence, from Kingston to Ogdensburg. He was employed to capture the steamboat Robert Peel, that carried passengers and the mail between Prescott and Toronto, and also to seize the Great Britain, another steamer, for the use of the patriots. With a desperate band, Johnston rushed on board of the Peel at Wells's William Johnston. Island, not far below Clayton, on the night of May 29, 1838. They were armed with muskets and bayo
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...