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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, Thomas Kilby 1820-1887 (search)
Smith, Thomas Kilby 1820-1887 Military officer; born in Boston, Mass., Sept. 23, 1820; graduated at Cincinnati College in 1837 admitted to the bar in 1845. When the Civil War broke out he became lieutenantcolonel of the 54th Ohio Infantry; promoted colonel in October of the same year; and with his regiment was conspicuous for bravery at Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, and the Vicksburg campaign. He was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers in August, 1863; won distinction in protecting the gunboats at Sabine Cross-roads when the National army fell back and the fleet withdrew down the river; was brevetted major-general of volunteers in March, 1865; and appointed United States consul at Panama in 1866. He died in New York City, Dec. 14, 1887.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stanley, David Sloan 1828- (search)
avid Sloan 1828- Military officer; born in Cedar Valley, O., June 1, 1828; graduated at West Point in 1852, entering the dragoon service. When the Civil War began he brought off the government property from the forts in the Southwest, and performed good service in Missouri, especially at Dug Springs and Wilson's Creek. After performing signal service in Mississippi, he became chief of cavalry in the Army of the Cumberland late in 1862, and displayed great skill in the battle of Stone River (q. v.), and afterwards in driving Bragg into Georgia. Late in 1863 he commanded a division of the 4th Corps. He was in the Atlanta campaign, and commanded the 4th Corps from July, 1864, to the close of the war. By his arrival on the battlefield at Franklin he averted serious disaster, but was wounded and disabled. He bad been made major-general of volunteers in November, 1862, and in March, 1865, was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was retired as brigadiergeneral in 1892.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Steele, Frederick 1819-1868 (search)
Steele, Frederick 1819-1868 Military officer; born in Delhi, N. Y., Jan. 14, 1819; graduated at West Point in 1843; served during the war against Mexico; and was major of infantry at the beginning of the Civil War, in service in Missouri. He was made brigadier-general of volunteers for his good conduct at the battle of Wilson's Frederick Steele. Creek, and major-general in November, 1862. He commanded a division under Sherman, and took part in the battle of Chickasaw Bluff and the capture of Fort Hindman. He commanded a division of Grant's army in the siege of Vicksburg, and afterwards commanded the Department of Arkansas to the end of the war. General Steele assisted in the capture of Mobile in April, 1865, he was then transferred to Texas. In March, 1865, he was brevetted majorgeneral. He died in San Mateo, Cal., Jan. 12, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stoneman, George 1822-1894 (search)
7,000 bales of cotton, a vast amount of ammunition, provisions, and clothing, and the railway tracks in each direction. The Union prisoners had been removed. On April 17 Stoneman started for east Tennessee. On the 19th Maj. E. E. C. Moderwell, with 250 cavalry, burned the fine bridge of the Charlotte and South Carolina Railroad, 1,150 feet in length and 50 feet above the water, over the Catawba. It was a blackened ruin in the space of thirty minutes. After a sharp skirmish with Confederate cavalry, the raiders returned to their main body at Dallas, with 325 prisoners, 200 horses, and two pieces of artillery. During the course of the raid the National cavalry captured 6,000 prisoners, twenty-five pieces of artillery taken in action, twenty-one abandoned, and a large number of small-arms. In March, 1865, General Stoneman was brevetted major-general, United States army, and in 1871 was retired. He was governor of California in 1883-87. He died in Buffalo, N. Y., Sept. 5, 1894.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Torbet, Alfred Thomas Archimedes 1833- (search)
Torbet, Alfred Thomas Archimedes 1833- Military officer; born in Georgetown, Del., July 1, 1833; graduated at West Point in 1855, serving in Florida in 1856-57. He became colonel of the 1st New Jersey Volunteers in September, 1861, and was active in the Peninsular campaign. He commanded a brigade in the battles of Groveton, or second battle of Bull Run, South Mountain (where he was wounded), and Antietam. In November, 1862, he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers; was engaged at Gettysburg; and commanded a division of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac from May to July, 1864. He was chief of cavalry in the Shenandoah campaign from August to October, 1864. and was brevetted major-general, United States army, in March, 1865. He resigned in October, 1866, and in 1871 was sent as consul-general to Havana. He was drowned in the wreck of the steamer Vera Cruz off the coast of Florida, Sept. 30, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Upton, Emory 1839-1881 (search)
Upton, Emory 1839-1881 Military officer; born in Batavia, N. Y., Aug. 27, 1839; graduated at West Point in 1861, and was assigned to the artillery. He became aide to General Tyler, and was wounded in the battle of Bull Run. In the Peninsular campaign he commanded a battery, and was active in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. In the campaign against Richmond (1864) he commanded a brigade until assigned to the army under Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, where he was wounded in the battle of Winchester. Early in 1865 he commanded a division of cavalry in General Wilson's operations in Alabama and Georgia, and was distinguished in the capture of Selma. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army, for meritorious services during the Rebellion. He was the author of Infantry tactics for the United States army, adopted in 1867. He died in San Francisco, Cal., March 14, 1881.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Reypen, William Knickerbocker 1840- (search)
Van Reypen, William Knickerbocker 1840- Naval officer; born in Bergen, N. J., Nov. 14, 1840; graduated at the Medical Department of the University of New York in 1862; served at the Naval Hospital, New York, in 1862, and on the frigate St. Lawrence of the East Gulf blockading squadron, in 1863-64; appointed medical director in March, 1865; surgeon-general United States navy, and chief of the bureau of medicine and surgery with the rank of rearadmiral, Oct. 22, 1897. During the American-Spanish War he designed and equipped the ambulance ship Solace, the first ever employed in naval warfare.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warner, Willard 1826- (search)
Sept. 4, 1826; graduated at Marietta College in 1845; removed to California in 1849; and engaged in mercantile business in Cincinnati, O., in 1852. He was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860. He served through the Civil War; was engaged at Fort Donelson, in the siege of Corinth, the Vicksburg campaign, the march from Vicksburg to Chattanooga, and in the battles of Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, and Ringgold. He was brevetted brigadier-general of volunteers in March, 1865, for gallantry; and mustered out of the service in the following July, when he returned to Ohio, served in the State Senate for a year, removed to Alabama in 1867, and engaged in cottonplanting. He was a member of the State legislature in 1868; United States Senator in 1868-71; collector of customs at Mobile, Ala., in 1871-72; and member of the Republican National conventions of 1868 and 1876. In 1873 he organized the Tecumseh Iron Company, of which he was general manager, and became pr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Warren, Gouverneur Kemble 1830-1882 (search)
(or second Bull Run), Antietam, and Fredericksburg. After Feb. 4, 1863, he was chief of topographical engineers of the Army of the Potomac. He was engaged in the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg (where he was wounded), and in the combats at Auburn and Bristow's Station. In March, 1864, he was placed in command of the 5th Army Corps, which post he held until April. 1865, in the campaign against Richmond, having been made major-general of volunteers in May, 1863. In that campaign he was exceedingly active and efficient, from the battle of the Wilderness to the battle of Five Forks. In March, 1865, he was brevetted major-general, United States army. He was the author of Explorations in the Dakota country; Preliminary report of explorations in Nebraska and Dakota in the years 1855–;57; and An account of the 5th army Corps at the battle of five Forks. He died in Newport, R. I., Aug. 8, 1882. A memorial statue of him was erected on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, in 188
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Weitzel, Godfrey 1835-1884 (search)
epartment of the Gulf, and became acting mayor of New Orleans after its capture. In August, 1862, he was made brigadier-general of volunteers, and did good service in Louisiana, commanding the advance of General Banks's army in operations there in 1863. He was at the capture of Port Hudson. In 1864 he commanded a division in the Army of the James, and was Butler's chief engineer at Bermuda Hundred. He was made commander of the 18th Army Corps, and was the leader of the land attack on Fort Fisher in December, 1864, in which he was second in command. Weitzel was made major-general of volunteers in November, 1864. During the spring of 1865 he was very active in operations against Richmond on the left bank of the James River, and led the troops that first entered Richmond after the flight of the Confederates from it. He was brevetted major-general, United States army, in March, 1865, and promoted lieutenant-colonel of engineers in 1882. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., March 19, 1884.
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