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Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 1 1 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 1 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 1 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frelinghuysen, Frederick Theodore 1817-1885 (search)
Frelinghuysen, Frederick Theodore 1817-1885 Statesman; born in Millstone, N. J., Aug. 4, 1817; grandson of the preceding; graduated at Rutgers College in 1836; became an eminent lawyer, and was attorney-general of New Jersey, 1861-66. He was chosen United States Senator in 1868, and was re-elected for a full term in 1871. He was a prominent member of the Republican party. In July, 1870, President Grant appointed him minister to England, but he declined the position. On Dec. 12, 1881, he entered the cabinet of President Arthur as Secretary of State, on the resignation of Secretary Blaine, and served to the end of that administration, March 4, 1885. He died in Newark, N. J., May 20, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frye, William Pierce (search)
Frye, William Pierce Lawyer; born William Pierce Frye. in Lewiston, Me., Sept. 12, 1831; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1850: and became a lawyer. He served as a member of the Maine legislature in 1861-62 and in 1867; was mayor of Lewiston in 1866-67; attorney-general of Maine in 1867-69; Representative in Congress in 1871-81; and was elected to the United States Senate in 1881, 1883, 1888, 1895, and 1900. For a number of years he was chairman of the Senate committee on commerce. In 1898 he was appointed one of the commissioners to negotiate a treaty with Spain, under the terms of the protocol, and afterwards ably defended the treaty in committee and on the floor of the Senate. In recognition of his services in behalf of peace the legislature of Maine set apart a day for him to become a guest of the State, and he was given a flattering reception.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garrett, Thomas 1783-1871 (search)
Garrett, Thomas 1783-1871 Abolitionist; born in Upper Darby, Pa., Aug. 21, 1783; acquired a fortune in the iron business. In 1807 his sympathy for the slaves was first aroused, and for forty years thereafter he aided escaping slaves so skilfully that when their owners found the fugitives had reached his house they generally abandoned the chase. He was instrumental within the limits of the law in liberating about 3,000 slaves from Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia. Later, however, he was forced to part with his whole fortune in paying damages to the owners of runaway slaves. Afterwards his friends loaned him money to again engage in business, and before his death he accumulated a second fortune. He died in Wilmington, Del., Jan. 23, 1871.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
h to 30th1843 to 1848 Herschel V. Johnson30th1848 William C. Dawson31st to 33d1849 to 1855 Robert M. Charlton32d1852 Robert Toombs33d to 36th1853 to 1861 Alfred Iverson34th to 36th1855 to 1861 36th to 41st1861 to 1871 Joshua Hill41st to 42d 1871 to 1873 H. V. M. Miller41st1871 Thomas M. Norwood42d to 43d1871 to 1875 John B. Gordon43d to 46th1873 to 1881 Benjamin H. Hill45th to 47th1877 to 1882 Joseph E. Brown47th to 51st1881 to 1891 Pope Barrow47th1882 Alfred H. Colquitt48th to 53doombs33d to 36th1853 to 1861 Alfred Iverson34th to 36th1855 to 1861 36th to 41st1861 to 1871 Joshua Hill41st to 42d 1871 to 1873 H. V. M. Miller41st1871 Thomas M. Norwood42d to 43d1871 to 1875 John B. Gordon43d to 46th1873 to 1881 Benjamin H. Hill45th to 47th1877 to 1882 Joseph E. Brown47th to 51st1881 to 1891 Pope Barrow47th1882 Alfred H. Colquitt48th to 53d1883 to 1894 John B. Gordon52d to 55th1891 to 1897 Augustus O. Bacon54th to ——1895 to —— Alexander S. Clay55th to —
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gerrish, Theodore 1846- (search)
Gerrish, Theodore 1846- Author; born in Houlton, Me., June 19, 1846; received an academic education; served in the Civil War, being wounded four times. In 1871-88 he was a Methodist Episcopal minister at various places in Maine. His publications include Reminiscences of the War; The Blue and the Gray, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Getty, George Washington 1819- (search)
shington 1819- Military officer; born in Georgetown, D. C., Oct. 2, 1819; was graduated at West Point in 1840; served in the war with Mexico, and in the Seminole War in Florida; and, becoming brigadier-general of volunteers in 1862, did excellent service in the campaign on the Peninsula. He was in the battles of South Mountain, Antietam, and Fredericksburg in 1862; also in the campaign against Richmond in 1864 until August, when he was brevetted major-general of volunteers. He was in the army in the Shenandoah Valley the remainder of the year. He was also in the battle at Sailor's Creek, and at the surrender of Lee. On Aug. 1, 1864, he was brevetted major-general of volunteers, and March 13, 1865, major-general in the regular army. He was commissioned colonel of the 37th Infantry in 1866; transferred to the 3d Artillery in 1871: and retired Oct. 2, 1883. His last service was as commander of the United States troops along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad during the riots of 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gilman, Nicholas Paine 1849- (search)
Gilman, Nicholas Paine 1849- Educator; born in Quincy, III., Dec. 21, 1849; was graduated at Harvard Divinity School in 1871; became Professor of Sociology and Ethics in the Meadville Theological School in 1895. He published Socialism and the American spirit, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Glisson, Oliver S. 1809-1890 (search)
Glisson, Oliver S. 1809-1890 Naval officer; born in Ohio in 1809; entered the navy in 1826; in 1862 was commander of the Mount Vernon, which rescued the transport Mississippi, on which were General Butler and 1,500 men. This vessel had grounded on the Frying-Pan Shoals, off North Carolina, while on the way to New Orleans. He was promoted rear-admiral in 1870; retired in 1871. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 20, 1890.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grand army of the republic, the. (search)
order greatly. A heavy decrease of membership followed, causing almost a total disruption of the order in the West. In May, 1869, a change in the ritual was made, providing for three grades of membership, but this met with little favor, and in 1871 all sections providing for degrees or ranks among members were stricken from the rules. At the same time, a rule was adopted prohibiting the use of the organization for any partisan purpose whatever, a principle which has ever since been strictlyef elected: 1. Indianapolis, Ind., 1866; S. A. Hurlbut, Illinois. 2. Philadelphia, Pa., 1868; John A. Logan, Illinois. 3. Cincinnati, O., 1869; John A. Logan, Illinois. 4. Washington, 1870; John A. Logan, Illinois. 5. Boston, Mass., 1871; A. E. Burnside, Rhode Island. 6. Cleveland, O., 1872; A. E. Burnside, Rhode Island. 7. New Haven, Conn., 1873; Charles Devens, Jr., Massachusetts. 8. Harrisburg, Pa., 1874; Charles Devens, Jr., Massachusetts. 9. Chicago, III., 1875; John
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grant, Frederick Dent 1850- (search)
Grant, Frederick Dent 1850- Military officer; born in St. Louis, Mo., May 30, 1850; eldest son of Ulysses S. Grant; was with his father at various times during the Civil War; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1871; accompanied General Sherman on his European trip in 1872; was appointed aide-de-camp on the staff of General Sheridan with the rank of lieutenant-colonel in 1873; took Frederick Dent Grant. part in the campaign on the frontier against the Indians; accompanied his father on his trip around the world; and resigned his commission in the army in 1881. In 1887 he was defeated as Republican candidate for secretary of state of New York, and in 1889 President Harrison appointed him minister to Austria-Hungary, where he remained till 1893. He was a police commissioner in New York City through the administration of Mayor Strong. In 1898, on the call for volunteers for the war with Spain, Colonel Grant offered his services to the President, and went to the f
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