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Dinarchus, Speeches 24 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 14 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 10 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Letters (ed. Norman W. DeWitt, Norman J. DeWitt) 6 0 Browse Search
Demades, On the Twelve Years 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. Thomas Wentworth Higginson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Demades, On the Twelve Years. You can also browse the collection for Chaeronea (Greece) or search for Chaeronea (Greece) in all documents.

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Demades, On the Twelve Years, section 13 (search)
The Thebans were suffering the closest restriction in the Macedonian garrisoni.e. the garrison established in the Cadmea by Philip after Chaeronea. which bound their hands together and had even deprived them of their freedom of speech. Time buried the power of Thebes with the body of Epaminonidas. The Macedonians had reached their full strength, and in their aspirations Fortune was already leading them across the sea against the throne and treasuries of Persia.
Demades, On the Twelve Years, section 9 (search)
I have, to bear me out, the burial of a thousand AtheniansIt is said that after Chaeronea in 338 B.C. Philip was insulting his prisoners, until Demades, by his frank speech, won him over to a better attitude towards Athens. Cf. Dio. Sic. 16.87. performed by the hands of our adversaries, hands which I won over from enmity to friendship towards the dead. Then, on coming to the fore in public life, I proposed the peace. I admit it. I proposed honors to Philip. I do not deny it. By making these proposals I gained for you two thousand captives free of ransom, a thousand Athenian dead, for whom no herald had to ask, and Oropus without an embassy.