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Pausanias, Description of Greece 58 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 14 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 10 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Diodorus Siculus, Library. You can also browse the collection for Troezen (Greece) or search for Troezen (Greece) in all documents.

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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 39 (search)
In Greece the Athenians after the victory at Plataea brought their children and wives back to Athens from Troezen and Salamis, and at once set to work fortifying the city and were giving their attention to every other means which made for its safety. But the Lacedaemonians, observing that the Athenians had gained for themselves great glory by the actions in which their navy had been engaged, looked with suspicion upon their growing power and decided to prevent the Athenians from rebuilding their walls. They at once, therefore, dispatched ambassadors to Athens who would ostensibly advise them not at present to fortify the city, as not being of advantage to the general interests of the Greeks; for, they pointed out, if Xerxes should return with larger armaments than before he would have walled cities ready to hand outside the Peloponnesus which he would use as bases and thus easily subjugate the Greeks. And when no attention
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 78 (search)
ses the term "Lacedaemonian" in a wide sense to refer to any ally of Sparta. with not paying the sacrifices to Apollo Pythaeus,The temple is likely the one in Asine, which was the only building spared by the Argives when they razed that city (cp. Paus. 2.36.5; Thuc. 5.53.1). declared war on them; and it was at this very time that Alcibiades, the Athenian general, entered Argolis with an army. Adding these troops to their forces, the Argives advanced against Troezen, a city which was an ally of the Lacedaemonians, and after plundering its territory and burning its farm-buildings they returned home. The Lacedaemonians, being incensed at the lawless acts committed against the Troezenians, resolved to go to war against the Argives; consequently they mustered an army and put their king Agis in command. With this force Agis advanced against the Argives and ravaged their territory, and leading his army to the vicinity of the city he