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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Bacchides, or The Twin Sisters (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Bacchides, or The Twin Sisters (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Evan (Minnesota, United States) or search for Evan (Minnesota, United States) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Bacchides, or The Twin Sisters (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act prologue, scene 0 (search)
come to you. PhilemonPhilemon: Philemon was a Greek Comic poet, of considerable merit, though inferior to Menander, of whom he was a contemporary. This play is more generally supposed to have been borrowed from a Comedy of Menander, which was called *di\s *e)capatw=n, "the Twice Deceived." formerly produced a play in Greek; this, those who speak the Greek language call "EvantidesEvantides: "Evantides" corresponds with the Latin word "Bacchantes," "followers," or "namesakes" of Bacchus," as "Evan" was one of the names by which that God was addressed during the celebration of the orgies.;" Plautus, who speaks the Latin, calls it "Bacchides." 'Tis not to be wondered, then, if hither I have come. Bacchus sends to you the Bacchides--the Bacchanalian Bacchanals. I am bringing them unto you. What! Have I told a lie? It don't become a God to tell a lie; but the truth I tell--I bring not them; but the salacious ass, wearied with its journey, is bringing to you three, if I remember right. One