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Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Aulularia, or The Concealed Treasure (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for Jupiter (North Carolina, United States) or search for Jupiter (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 33 (search)
Among many other jests, this was one: As he stood by the statue of Jupiter, he asked Apelles, the tragedian, which of them he thought was biggest? Upon his demurring about it, he lashed him most severely, now and then commending his voice whilst he entreated for mercy, as being well modulated even when he was venting his grief. As often as he kissed the neck of his wife or mistress, hewould say, "So beautiful a throat must be cut whenever Tplease;" and now and then he would threaten to put his dear Caesonia to the torture, that he pnight discover why he loved her so passionately.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Caligula (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 57 (search)
His approaching fate was indicated by many prodigies. The statue of Jupiter at Olympia, which he had ordered to be taken down and brought to Rome, suddenly burst out into such a violent fit of laughter, that, the machines employed in the work giving way, the workmen took to their heels. When this accident happened, there came up a man named Cassius, who said that he was commanded in a dream to sacrifice a bull to Jupiter. The Capitol at Capua was struck with lightning upon the ides of March [iJupiter. The Capitol at Capua was struck with lightning upon the ides of March [i th March]; as was also, at Rome, the apartment of the chief porter of the Palatiun. Some construed the latter into a presage that the master of the palace was in danger from his own guards; and the other they regarded as a sign, that an illustrious person would be cut off, as had happened before on that day. Sylla, the astrologer, being consulted by him respecting his nativity, assured him, "That death would unavoidably and speedily befall him." The oracle of Fortune at Antium likewise forewar