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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 79 79 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 18 18 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Epistulae ad Familiares (ed. L. C. Purser) 16 16 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 12 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Letters to Atticus (ed. L. C. Purser) 4 4 Browse Search
Frank Frost Abbott, Commentary on Selected Letters of Cicero 3 3 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 1 1 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 1 1 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, De Officiis: index (ed. Walter Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition.. You can also browse the collection for 50 BC or search for 50 BC in all documents.

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J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero , Allen and Greenough's Edition., Life of Cicero. (search)
His administration was in accord with the principles expressed in his writings,—clean and honest,—a thing worthy of notice in an age of corruption and greed. He had the good fortune to escape the test of a formidable war, but he was successful in overcoming some tribes of plundering mountaineers. For this he was hailed as imperator, according to custom, and he even hoped for the honor of a triumph, the highest conventional distinction which a Roman could obtain. He returned to Rome late in B.C. 50, and was still endeavoring to secure permission to celebrate his triumph These efforts were unsuccessful. when the great Civil War between Caesar and Pompey broke out (B.C. 49). From the beginning of the Civil War to the Murder of Caesar (B.C. 49-44). Cicero was now in a very difficult position. It became necessary for every man of importance to take sides; yet he could not see his way clear to join either party. For some time he vacillated, while both Caesar and Pompey made earnest effor
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 10 (search)
ut velis: for this rare constr., see § 571,c (332,f); Cf. G. 553,4; cf. H. 571, 2 (501, i, 2); Cf. H.-B. 521,3 and N. studiis prosequemur, the figure is that of a distinguished Roman escorted by a throng with enthusiastic acclamations (studiis). hujus curiae: the old Curia Hostilia, on the north side of the Comitium, was destroyed by fire in the riots after the death of Clodius, B.C. 52 (see Milo, sect. 33); but was rebuilt by Faustus Sulla, son of the dictator. C. Marcelli: Cos. B.C. 50, cousin of M. Marcellus. suam: § 301, c (196, g); B. 244, a, 4; G. 309, 2; H. 503, 4 (449, 2); H.-B. 264, 2
J. B. Greenough, G. L. Kittredge, Select Orations of Cicero, Allen and Greenough's Edition., section 2 (search)
Considio: C. Considius Longus, a propraetor of Africa in B.C. 50, the year before the Civil War. socus: see note on Verres 1, sect. 13 (p. 32, l. 29). satis facere, etc.: if a governor left his province before the expiration of his term, he could appoint any officer he chose to govern. pro praetore in his place, and such a substitute exercised the imperium of his superior. It was usual, although not obligatory, to appoint the highest subordinate officer, the quaestor. Hence this apologetic expression of the orator: Ligarius, he says, was so highly esteemed both by the Roman residents and by the native provincials that Considius could do no less than appoint him.