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The Daily Dispatch: July 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Afternoon landscape: poems and translations 10 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Cleopatra or search for Cleopatra in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Camp fires of the boys in Gray. (search)
f kings. As for thee, dark-eyed Egyptian, Glorious Sorceress of the Nile, Light the path to Stygian horrors With the glories of thy smiles. Give to Caesar Crowns and Arches, Let his brow the Laurel twine-- I could scorn the Senate's triumph, Triumphing in love like thine. I am dying, Egypt, dying I Hard I the insulting foeman's cry, They are coming! quick! my falchion!! Let me front them ere I die. Ah! no more amid the battle, Shall my heart exulting swell-- Iris and Osiris guard thee-- Cleopatra! Rome! Farewell! Good Bully! Go ahead, Jack! Give us some more, old fellow! And he generally did, much to everybody's satisfaction. We all loved Jack, the Poet of our mess. He sleeps, his battles o'er, in Hollywood. The Singing man generally put in towards the last and sung us to bed. He was generally a diminutive man, with a sweet voice and a sweetheart at home. His songs had in them rosy lips, blue eyes, golden hair, pearly teeth, and all that sort of thing. Of course he w