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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 149 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 99 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 81 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 54 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Robert L. McCook or search for Robert L. McCook in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 7 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McClellan in West Virginia. (search)
de under Brigadier-General Morris, of Indiana, was at Philippi, and the rest were in three brigades forming the immediate command of McClellan, the brigadiers being General W. S. Rosecrans, U. S. A., General Newton Schleich, of Ohio, and Colonel Robert L. McCook, of Ohio. On the date of his proclamation McClellan intended, as he informed General Scott, to move his principal column to Buckhannon on June 25th, and thence at once upon Beverly; but delays occurred, and it was not till July 2d that From a photograph. of the turnpike. Before leaving Grafton the rumors he heard had made him estimate Garnett's force at 6000 or 7000 men, of which the larger part were at Laurel Mountain in front of General Morris. On the 6th of July he moved McCook with two regiments to Middle Fork Bridge, about half-way to Beverly, and on the same day ordered Morris to march with his brigade from Philippi to a position one and a half miles in front of Garnett's principal camp, which was promptly done. Thr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
nion army. Brig.-Gen. Irvin McDowell. Staff loss: w, 1. (Capt. O. H. Tillinghast, mortally wounded.) First division Brig.-Gen. Daniel Tyler. Staff loss: w, 2. First Brigade, Col. Erasmus D. Keyes 2d Me., Col. C. D. Jameson 1st Conn., Col. G. S. Burnham 2d Conn., Col. A. H. Terry 3d Conn., Col. John L. Chatfield. Brigade loss: k, 19; w, 50; m, 154 = 223. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert C. Schenck 2d N. Y. (militia), Col. G. W. B. Tompkins 1st Ohio, Col. A. McD. McCook 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Rodney Mason E, 2d U. S. Arty., Capt. J. H. Carlisle. Brigade loss: k, 21; w, 25; m, 52 = 98. Third Brigade, Col. W. T. Sherman 13th N. Y., Col. I. F. Quinby 69th N. Y., Col. M. Corcoran (w and c), Capt. James Kelly 79th N. Y., Col. James Cameron (k) 2d Wis., Lieut.-Col. H. W. Peck E, 3d U. S. Arty., Capt. R. B. Ayres. Brigade loss: k, 107; w, 205; m, 293 = 605. Fourth Brigade, Col. Israel B. Richardson 1st Mass., Col. Robert Cowdin 12th N.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
mberland, opposite Mill Springs) and about the same distance west of Somerset, with the 9th Ohio and 2d Minnesota of Robert L. McCook's brigade, the 10th Indiana of Manson's brigade, Kenny's battery, and a battalion of Wolford's cavalry. The 4th Ken's remaining Brig.-Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer, C. S. A. From a photograph. guns were held in the rear of the center, and McCook's two regiments were ordered up, the 9th Ohio on the right of the 10th Indiana, and the 2d Minnesota in reserve behind thnd 10th Indiana beginning to fail, the 2d Minnesota was ordered to relieve them, which it did under severe fire. Both of McCook's regiments were admirably drilled and disciplined, and moved to the attack with the order and steadiness of veterans. Tasualties being confined entirely to the 10th Indiana, 4th Kentucky, 2d Minnesota, 9th Ohio, and Wolford's cavalry. Colonels McCook and Fry were among the wounded. The enemy's loss he reported as 192 killed, 89 prisoners not wounded, and 68 prison
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
rning, forming the left wing. Two other divisions, Crittenden's and McCook's, came up the river from Savannah in the transports, and were on t river; Crittenden was next in line after Nelson, and on his right; McCook followed, and formed the extreme right of Buell's command. My old anding, it was halted, and the commanding officer, General A. McD. McCook, rode up to where I was and appealed to me not to send his divisionch I wrote for The Century magazine, I stated that General A. McD. McCook, who commanded a division of Buell's army, expressed some unwillingo makes the same statement, on my authority. Out of justice to General McCook and his command, I must say that they left a point twenty-two mn, both in his memoirs and report, makes mention of this fact. General McCook himself belongs to a family which furnished many volunteers to . I refer to these circumstances with minuteness because I did General McCook injustice in my article in The Century, though not to the exten
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
and successive days by the infantry divisions, McCook being in advance with instructions to move ste in flames, and the river at flood stage. General McCook immediately commenced the construction of and the battery was brought into service with McCook in the afternoon. Sherman had no artillery wia very stubborn resistance, chiefly because of McCook's vigorous pressure along the western Corinth treme right, and the decisive part ascribed to McCook's division in that part of the field in the reision at a crisis in its operations, by one of McCook's regiments. Colonel McGinnis, of the 11th with this Kentucky brigade. Of the action of McCook's division, General Sherman further says: I cohe Confederate batteries playing fiercely upon McCook, and they were soon silenced. General Sherman most probably with General Grant's authority, McCook's division had started to the river. Before tletter to me is, of course, insufficient. General McCook may have told him that his men were hungry[11 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
other brigades of the same division The Union gun-boats at Shiloh on the evening of the first day. From a lithograph. (McCook's) were close at hand. Thus, at the instant when the battle was opened we had to face at least 23,000 fresh troops, incl, with 18 guns. The strength of Crittenden's division may be estimated at 6750, rank and file, and Rousseau's brigade of McCook's division at 2250.-G. T. B. On the Confederate side there was not a man who had not taken part in the battle of the day riously pressed and must have been turned but for the opportune arrival and effective use of Terrill's regular battery of McCook's division. In the meantime Crittenden's division became involved in the battle, but was successfully kept at bay for several hours by the forces under Hardee and Breckinridge, until it was reinforced by two brigades of McCook's division which had been added to the attacking force on the field, after the battle had been joined, the force of fresh troops being thus
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.53 (search)
ped from the transports, which were fast on the mud bottoms, and, holding their cartridge-boxes and muskets over their heads, waded to the land. In addition to the 13 regiments of infantry, 8 pieces of artillery were landed, 6 in charge of Lieutenant McCook, of the navy, and 2 commanded by Captains Dayton and Bennett, of the Marine Artillery. The enemy had chosen a strong position, well calculated for defensive purposes. On Otter Creek, about seven miles up the river from the mouth of Sloral engagement was immediately consummated. The 25th Massachusetts had the extreme right; second in line came the 24th Massachusetts, its left resting on the country road, which was occupied by the artillery commanded by Captain Dayton and Lieutenant McCook. The 27th Massachusetts, with its right resting on the country road, was joined on its left by the 23d Massachusetts, the whole parallel with the enemy's works. The artillery and right regiments opened the engagement before those on the l