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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 10: Sherman's Army. (search)
settled dislike to us, latent at least, among Sherman's men. In a certain class their manner was contemptuous and bullying. They threatened to come over and burst us up, and clean us out. Some directed their objurgations upon the whole East, --the Yankees generally; and more against the Army of the Potomac in particular. You couldn't fight. --You are babies and hospital cats. --We did all the marching and all the fighting. --We had to send Grant and Sheridan up to teach you how to fight. --Lee licked you, and was running away to get something to eat, poor fellow. --You wouldn't have caught him if we hadn't marched two thousand miles to drive him into the trap. On some of these points we might be a little tender; though on the whole we thought the charge a perversion of fact. But we had some Bowery boys and Fire Zouaves in our army too; and what they wanted was to get at these Sherman's Bummers and settle the question in their own Cossack and Tartar fashion. In fact, so serio
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 11: the disbandment. (search)
Grant leave the front of Meade and the Army of the Potomac where the principal negotiations with Lee had already begun, make the journey to Sheridan's front where Ord of the Army of the James was inobservation and experience we regarded Grant as a great general,--particularly in comparison with Lee. While our opinion could in no degree affect the reputation of either of these generals, it might were witnesses,servants and sufferers,--and it is our proud remembrance. Our estimate of General Lee was that he exemplified remarkable ability as a commander. In military sagacity and astuteneas ranking less than great among generals, and of the best of them. As to personal qualities, Lee's utter unselfishness, in fact his whole moral constitution, appeared to us singularly fine. In manly worth. Such care was manifest in the army life within our knowledge,--both in our army and Lee's, and presumably in others. Then as to the reactionary effect of warfare on the participants
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Military order of the Loyal Legion of the United States: headquarters Commandery of the State of Maine. (search)
res of their division. The next day in the advance on the South Side Railroad he still had the advance. He drove Fitz Hugh Lee's division of cavalry across the railroad, captured a train, and routed the enemy from his position. In the subsequen was designated to receive with the division he then temporarily commanded the formal surrender of the arms and colors of Lee's army on the 12th of April, 1865. The description of this historic ceremony by Gen. Morris Schaaf in his Sunset of th of the mind. What glorified tenderness that courtly act has added to the scene! How it, and the courage of both armies, Lee's character and tragic lot, Grant's magnanimity and Chamberlain's chivalry, have lifted the historic event up to a lofty, n, the 9th of April, his command had the advance, and was driving the enemy rapidly before it when the announcement of General Lee's surrender was made. The recommendation was cordially approved by Generals Meade and Grant and forwarded to Washingt