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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign in Pennsylvania. (search)
ety-five thousand. I think General Lee had about ninety thousand infantry, four thousand to five thousand artillery, and about ten thousand cavalry. Again, he testifies: I think the returns showed me, when I took command of the army, amounted to about one hundred and five thousand men; included in those were the eleven thousand of General French. In this latter matter the evidence is against General Meade. General Hooker, on the 27th of June, 1863, telegraphed to General Halleck, from Poolesville: My whole force of enlisted men for duty will not exceed one hundred and five thousand (105,000). This would make his total effective force (officers and men) full one hundred and twelve thousand. This dispatch was received by General Halleck at nine A. M. On reaching Sandy Hook, subsequently, on the same day, General Hooker telegraphed as follows, concerning the garrison at Harper's Ferry, under General French: I find ten thousand men here in condition to take the field. Here they are
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign of Gettysburg. (search)
headquarters were not more than a quarter of a mile from the ford, and we pushed our advance with such vigor that we captured it, with a copy of his orders and other important papers indicating the campaign Lee intended to make. In obedience to his orders, Stuart was to have crossed Beverly ford that morning to destroy the railroad to Alexandria, for the purpose of delaying the Army of the Potomac in its movement north; while that Lee intended to cross the Potomac in the neighborhood of Poolesville and the Monocacy, from the other communications captured, was evident. Stuart, stung at being surprised, soon had his command in action, and did some splendid fighting that day to recover his position. The whole of my line was engaged at once, and for a time it was charge and counter-charge. Nothing could have been finer than the gallantry displayed by the troops on both sides; but my command knew they had gained an advantage, and they were determined to keep it. The desperate attac