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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Outbreak of the rebellion-presiding at a Union meeting-mustering officer of State troops- Lyon at camp Jackson-services tendered to the government (search)
go to Springfield I went with them [April 25] and remained there until they were assigned to a regiment. There were so many more volunteers than had been called for that the question whom to accept was quite embarrassing to the governor, Richard Yates. The legislature was in session at the time, however, and came to his relief. A law was enacted authorizing the governor to accept the services of ten additional regiments, one from each congressional district, for one month, to be paid by, forming a part of the 11th Illinois volunteer infantry. My duties, I thought, had ended at Springfield, and I was prepared to start home by the evening train, leaving at nine o'clock. Up to that time I do not think I had been introduced to Governor Yates, or had ever spoken to him. I knew him by sight, however, because he was living at the same hotel and I often saw him at table. The evening I was to quit the capital I left the supper room before the governor and was standing at the front do
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Appointed Colonel of the 21st Illinois-Personnel of the regiment-general Logan-March to Missouri-movement against Harris at Florida, Mo. --General Pope in command-stationed at Mexico, Mo. (search)
and were accepted with their organizations as they were, except in two instances. A Chicago regiment, the 19th infantry, had elected a very young man to the colonelcy. When it came to taking the field the regiment asked to have another appointed colonel and the one they had previously chosen made lieutenant-colonel. The 21st regiment of infantry, mustered in by me at Mattoon, refused to go into the service with the colonel of their selection in any position. While I was still absent Governor Yates appointed me colonel of this latter regiment. A few days after I was in charge of it and in camp on the fair grounds near Springfield [June 15]. My regiment was composed in large part of young men of as good social position as any in their section of the State. It embraced the sons of farmers, lawyers, physicians, politicians, merchants, bankers and ministers, and some men of maturer years who had filled such positions themselves. There were also men in it who could be led astray
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Attack on Grand Gulf-operations below Vicksburg (search)
f the river as soon as possible. Accordingly, on the morning of the 29th, McClernand was directed to embark all the troops from his corps that our transports and barges could carry. About 10,000 men was so embarked. The plan was to have the navy silence the guns at Grand Gulf, and to have as many men as possible ready to debark in the shortest possible time under cover of the fire of the navy and carry the works by storm. The following order was issued: Note: On this occasion Governor Richard Yates, of Illinois, happened to be on a visit to the army, and accompanied me to Carthage. I furnished an ambulance for his use and that of some of the State officers who accompanied him. Perkins' Plantation, La., April 27, 1863 Major-General J. A. McClernand, Commanding 13th A. C. Commence immediately the embarkation of your corps, or so much of it as there is transportation for. Have put aboard the artillery and every article authorized in orders limiting baggage, except the men, a