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Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 11: (search)
t the first tidings of the approach of the Yankee forces came to me as I was about to open the gate leading out on to the public road from Mr. G --‘s homestead. I was on my way to the school, when a man rode up, and halting an instant said, General Grierson and his army are marching from Mobile to Eufaula, and they will probably reach Eufaula to-night, or early to-morrow morning! As Mr. G — lived near the main highway, he did not expect to escape the invading army. Now, it seemed, we were te entered the house by the back door, just in time to find all in great confusion, caused by a false alarm. The home guards, composed of old men and young boys of the county, had that afternoon disbanded in the city of Eufaula, knowing that General Grierson would arrive that night or the next morning, and that resistance would be useless. So they deemed discretion just then the better part of valor, and here they were, returning home by the road on which my employer's plantation lay, their exp
Parthenia Antoinette Hague, A blockaded family: Life in southern Alabama during the war, Chapter 12: (search)
te to Eufaula. In our neighborhood, it was not believed at first that the enemy would find us, hence they left their own home to visit the relatives who lived near us. But rumors began to fly thick and fast when it was known positively that General Grierson was on the march from Mobile, and then it was believed that he would surely come by on our road. So the disabled Confederate soldier and his family packed their carriage again, and left our settlement. They made for the public road which, according to their theory, would be the one General Grierson would be least likely to choose to march into Eufaula by. They proceeded seven or eight miles undisturbed by anything, and were congratulating themselves on being so fortunate as to flank the enemy, when just as they turned a bend of the road that led into another, alack-a-day! there was one moving mass of blue, up the road and down the road, as far as the eye could see. They had driven altogether unexpectedly right into the mi