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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, I. April, 1861 (search)
ure of public sentiment, and place the State in the attitude now manifestly desired by an overwhelming majority of the people. He was answered by the gallant Capt. Wise, who thrilled every breast with his intrepid bearing and electric bursts of oratory. He advocated action, without reference to the other Convention, as the best means of bringing the Unionists to their senses. And the so-called Demosthenean Seddon, and G. W. Randolph (grandson of Thomas Jefferson), Lieut.-Gov. Montague, James Lyons, Judge Robertson, etc., were there. Never, never did I hear more exalted and effective bursts of oratory. And it was apparent that messages were constantly received from the other Convention. What they were, I did not learn at the moment; but it was evident that the Unionists were shaking in their shoes, and they certainly begged one--just oneday's delay, which was accorded them. The People's Convention agreed to adjourn till 10 o'clock A. M. the next day. But before we separated a c
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, X. January, 1862 (search)
the labors of the day, and he is a regular attendant at St. Paul's Church. I am rather inclined to credit the rumor that he intends to join the church. All his messages and proclamations indicate that he is looking to a mightier power than England for assistance. There is a general desire to have the cabinet modified and Christianized upon the inauguration of the permanent government. January 11 We have three candidates in the field in this district for Congress: President Tyler, James Lyons, and Wm. II. McFarland. The first will, of course, walk over the track. January 12 Gen. Wise, whose headquarters are to be fixed at Nag's Head on the beach near Roanoke Island, reports that the force he commands is altogether inadequate to defend the position. Burnside is said to have 20,000 men, besides a numerous fleet of gun-boats; and Gen. Wise has but 3000 effective men. January 13 The department leaves Gen. Wise to his superior officer, Gen. Huger, at Norfolk, who has
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 13 (search)
veral years in this city, does not seem to have a dozen acquaintances. But he inherits a name, being descended from Thomas Jefferson, and, I believe, likewise from the Mr. Randolph in Washington's cabinet. Mr. Randolph was a captain at Bethel under Magruder; and subsequently promoted to a colonelcy. Announcing his determination to quit the military service more than a month ago, he entered the field as a competitor for the seat in Congress left vacant by the death of President Tyler. Hon. James Lyons was elected, and Col. Randolph got no votes at all. March 30 Gen. Lee is to have command of all the armies --but will not be in the field himself. He will reside here. Congress passed an act to create a commanding general; but this was vetoed, for trenching on the executive prerogative-or failed in some way. The proceedings were in secret session. March 31 Gen. Joseph E. Johnston is to command on the Peninsula. The President took an affectionate leave of him the other day
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XX. November, 1862 (search)
cess to the President. This looks like the beginning of an imperial court. But what may not its ending be? I see that Mr. Hurlbut, incarcerated once as a spy, or as a writer for an Abolition paper in New York, and a Northern man himself, after being protected by Mr. Browne (the English A. D.C. of the President) and released by Mr. Benjamin from prison, has escaped to the North, and is out in a long article in the Times! He says he got a passport from Gen. Winder's Provost Marshal. Mr. James Lyons thought he had made H. a Southern man; what does he think now? The 290 or Alabama, the ship bought in Europe, and commanded by Capt. Semmes, C. S. N., is playing havoc with the commerce of the United States. If we had a dozen of them, our foes would suffer incalculably, for they have an immense amount of shipping. I see Semmes had captured the Tonawanda, that used to lie at the foot of Walnut Street, Philadelphia; but he released her, first putting the master under bond to pay Pre
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIII. February, 1863 (search)
est farther up the river. The heroic pilot ran the boat under our masked batteries, and then succeeded in escaping by swimming. The Queen of the West was forced to surrender. This adventure has an exhilarating effect upon our spirits. Hon. James Lyons sent to the President to-day a petition, signed by a majority of the members of Congress, to have me appointed major in the conscription service. February 21 Major-Gen. Hood's division passed through the city to-day, and crossed over t. Our soldiers must be fed and clothed according to the rules and regulations, or suffer and perish for the want of food and clothing! I have some curiosity to learn what the President has indorsed, or may indorse, on the paper sent him by Mr. Lyons, signed by half the members of Congress. Will he simply refer it to the Secretary? Then what will the Secretary do? My friends in Congress will likewise be curious to learn the result. February 23 I saw a letter from Gen. Lee to-day, s
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, Xxiv. March, 1863 (search)
ay from Bishop Lay, in Arkansas. He says affairs in that State wear a dark and gloomy aspect. He thinks the State is lost. Gen. Beauregard writes the Hon. Mr. Miles that he has not men enough, nor heavy guns enough, for the defense of Charleston. If this were generally known, thousands would despair, being convinced that those charged with the reins of power are incompetent, unequal to the crisis, and destined to conduct them to destruction rather than independence. March 24 Judge Lyons has granted an injunction, arresting the impressment of flour by the Secretary of War, and Congress is debating a bill which, if passed, will be a marked rebuke to the government. Notwithstanding the wishes of the Secretary of War, the President, and Gen. Rains, Lt.-Col. Lay is still exempting Marylanders, and even foreigners who have bought real estate, and resided for years in this country, if they have not taken the oath of domicile. In Eastern Tennessee, 25,500 conscripts were
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 27 (search)
urs, intensified the alarm. The presence of the enemy would not have produced a greater effect. But, in truth, the enemy were almost in sight of the city. Hon. James Lyons told me they were within a mile and a half of his house, which is about that distance from the city. Thousands of men, mostly old men and employees of the gbama; and everywhere South the crops are unprecedented in amount. To-morrow is election day. For Congress, Col. Wickham, who voted against secession, opposes Mr. Lyons. But he has fought since! We have a letter from Gen. Jos. E. Johnston, dated at Calhoun, Miss., 16th inst. He says the enemy on the railroad at Clinton numbmation at the polls, this being election day. It is said Mr. Wickham, who for a long time, in the Convention, voted against the secession of Virginia, is leading Mr. Lyons, an original secessionist, and will probably beat him. And Flournoy, an old Whig politician, will probably be elected governor. A dispatch from Gen. Johnston
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXVII. June, 1863 (search)
may defeat both sides. Early's victory. we have only supplies of corn from day to day. Chambersburg struck. Col. Whiting complains of blockade running at Wilmington. false alarm. Grant still before Vicksburg. June 1 Nothing decisive from Vicksburg. It is said Northern papers have been received, of the 29th May, stating that their Gen. Grant had been killed, and Vicksburg (though at first prematurely announced) captured. We are not ready to believe the latter announcement. Mr. Lyons has been beaten for Congress by Mr. Wickham. It is said the brigade commanded by Gen. Barton, in the battle near Vicksburg, broke and ran twice. If that be so, and their conduct be imitated by other brigades, good-by to the Mississippi Valley! Our people everywhere are alive to the expected raid of the enemy's cavalry, and are organizing the men of non-conscript age for defense. One of our pickets whistled a horse, drinking in the Rappahannock, and belonging to Hooker's army,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
s Government. The Secretary of War has called upon the Governor for all the available slave labor in the State, to work on the defenses, etc. The United States flag of truce boat came up to City Point last night, bringing no prisoners, and nothing else except some dispatches, the nature of which has not yet transpired. September 8 We have nothing further from Charleston, to-day, except that the enemy is not yet in possession of Sumter. Mr. Seddon, Secretary of War, said to Mr. Lyons, M. C., yesterday, that he had heard nothing of Gen. Lee's orders to march a portion of his army to Tennessee. That may be very true; but, nevertheless, 18,000 of Lee's troops (a corps) is already marching thitherward. A report on the condition of the military prisons, sent in to-day, shows that there is no typhoid fever, or many cases of other diseases, among the prisoners of war. Everything is kept in cleanliness about them, and they have abundance of food, wholesome and palatable.
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXIII. December, 1863 (search)
at he signed a contract with the Commissary-General last night to furnish meat on the Mississippi in Tennessee, in exchange for cotton. He told me that the proposition was made by the Federal officers, and will have their connivance, if not the connivance of Federal functionaries in Washington, interested in the speculation. Lieut..Col. Ruffin prefers trading with the enemy at New Orleans. It is rumored that Mr. Seddon will resign, and be succeeded by Gov. Letcher; notwithstanding Hon. James Lyons asserted in public (and it appears in the Examiner to-day) that Gov. L. told Gen. J. R. Anderson last year, subsequent to the fall of Donelson, he was still in favor of the Union. December 20 We have nothing new yet from Averill's raiders; but it is said Gen. Lee has set a trap for them. From East Tennessee there is a report that a battle has taken place somewhere in that region, but with what result is not yet known. There is much consternation among the Jews and other specu
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