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Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 241 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 222 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 141 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 141 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 131 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 86 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 80 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 68 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 63 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 54 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox. You can also browse the collection for George Crook or search for George Crook in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 16: the lost order --South Mountain. (search)
Crome, which advanced with the infantry. The battle was thus opened by General Pleasonton and General Cox without orders, and without information of the lost despatch. The latter had the foresight to support this move with his brigade under Colonel Crook. Batteries of twenty-pound Parrott guns were posted near the foot of the mountain in fine position to open upon the Confederates at the summit. After posting Colquitt's brigade, General Hill rode off to his right to examine the approach He hurried back and sent Garland's brigade, with Bondurant's battery, to meet the approaching enemy. Garland made connection with Rosser's detachment and engaged in severe skirmish, arresting the progress of Scammon's brigade till the coming of Crook's, when Cox gave new force to his fight, and after a severe contest, in which Garland fell, the division advanced in a gallant charge, which broke the ranks of the brigade, discomfited by the loss of its gallant leader, part of it breaking in co
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 19: battle of Sharpsburg, or Antietam (continued). (search)
. Upon receipt of the first order General Burnside advanced his troops, General Crook's brigade, supported by General Sturgis's division, to the bridge and ford batteries were posted on the right. One section of Simmonds's battery was with Crook's brigade, the other with Benjamin's battery. Dahlgren's boat-howitzers covereat ten o'clock: The line of skirmishers advanced and engaged across the river. Crook's brigade marched for the bridge. After a severe engagement of some hours, GenGeneral Crook posted two of Simmonds's guns in position to cover the bridge, and after some little time General Sturgis's division approached the bridge, led by Naglee'supported by the Scammon brigade of the Kanawha division, the brigade under General Crook to move with the troops from the bridge. Clark's, Durell's, Cook's, Muhraham; Harrison's co. W. Va. Cav., Lieut. Dennis Delaney. Second Brigade, Col. George Crook; 11th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Augustus H. Coleman, Maj. Lynman J. Jackson; 28th
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 36: strategic importance of the field. (search)
spring. Furlough all the veterans you deem it prudent to let go. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Major-General J. M. Schofield, Knoxville, Tenn.: You need not attempt the raid with the cavalry you now have. If that in Kentucky can recruit up it may do hereafter to send it on such an expedition. I have asked so often for a cooperative movement from the troops in West Virginia that I hardly expect to see anything to help us from there. General Halleck says they have not got men enough. Crook, however, has gone there, and may undertake to strike the road about New River. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Major-General Halleck, General-in-Chief, Washington: General,-- I have got General Thomas ready to move a force of about fourteen thousand infantry into East Tennessee to aid the force there in expelling Longstreet from the State. He would have started on Monday night if I had not revoked the order. My reasons for doing this are these: General Foster, who is now here (or lef