Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for May 22nd or search for May 22nd in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
ieth Illinois Infantry, of operations June 7-September 8. No. 28Col. Isaac C. B. Suman, Ninth Indiana Infantry. No. 29Lieut. Col. Orrin D. Hurd, Thirtieth Indiana Infantry. No. 30Capt. John C. Taylor, Eighty-fourth Indiana Infantry, of operations August 16-September 8. No. 31Col. Thomas E. Rose, Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry. No. 32Brig. Gen. John Newton, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division. No. 33Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First Brigade, of operations May 22-August 4. No. 34Col. Emerson Opdycke, One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of operations August 6-September 8. No. 35Lieut. Col. Porter C. Olson, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry. No. 36Lieut. Col. John Russell, Forty-fourth Illinois Infantry. No. 37Maj. Thomas W. Motherspaw, Seventy-third Illinois Infantry. No. 38Capt. Thomas J. Bryan, Seventy-fourth Illinois Infantry. No. 39Lieut. Col. George W. Smith, Eighty-eighth Illinois Infantry. No. 40Col. Bernar
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
vision was directed to take post on Stanley's left, but all but one or two regiments of it were crowded out by our forming a junction with General Hooker's corps. In this position, with General Hooker on the left and General Palmer on the right, continuous skirmishing and artillery firing was kept up until after dark. Before morning Johnston had abandoned another strongly intrenched position about Cassville and fled across the Etowah River, destroying the railroad bridge. May 20, 21, and 22, the army rested in position near Cassville, renewed its supplies, sent back everything surplus, and made other preparations for a movement on Dallas. May 23, crossed the Etowah River at Gillem's Bridge and went into position at Euharlee Creek. May 24, crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill and marched to Burnt Hickory, where we encamped for the night. May 25, command marched by a settlement road, making a detour to the right of Burnt Hickory, and expecting to come into Dallas by
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 37 (search)
No. 33. report of Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, U. S. Army, commanding First brigade, of operations May 22-August 4. Hdqrs. First Brig., Second Div., 4TH Army Corps, Near Atlanta, Ga., August 4, 1864. Sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to Special Field Orders, No. 139, extract 6, dated headquarters Department of the Cumberland, May 20, 1864, I assumed command of the First Brigade of your division on the 22d day of May, 1864, the brigade being then in camp at Two-Run Creek,mand of it and assigned to the command of the First Division of this corps, Col. E. Opdycke, of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, taking my place in the brigade. The total loss of the brigade while under my command, from the 22d day of May until the 4th day of August, was 71 killed, 341 wounded, 9 missing, and 4 captured; total loss, 424. All of the regiments in the brigade were small, their aggregate effective strength averaging about 175 each, and the command was many tim
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
evacuated his position in our immediate front. Marched at 8 a. m., passing through the village of Adairsville during the forenoon, camping at dark near the railroad. May 19, marched at 7 a. m., passed through Kingston at noon, formed line of battle about 3 p. mn., advanced to within two miles of Cassville, bivouacking at 10 p. m. Constant skirmishing during the day. Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, in compliance with orders from General Thomas, relieved Colonel Sherman in command of the brigade May 22. The regiment remained at this point at rest until 12 noon of the 23d instant, when it marched in a southwesterly direction, crossing the Etowah River at 10 p. m., camping at midnight four miles beyond the river. May 24, marched at 6 a. m., moving slowly and with frequent halts, camping at 8 p. m. May 25, marched at 9 a. m., halting at 4 p. m.; lay in line of battle all this night (25-26). Continuous rain all night. This near New Hope Church. May 26, slightly changed position this morning
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
herever it was required. In this way we moved all day until about 4 o'clock, when I deployed the rest of my regiment as skirmishers on the extreme right of our brigade, connecting on my left with the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and right with General Wood's division. In this position I remained all night. Was relieved the next morning (18th) at 6 o'clock by the Forty-second Illinois Volunteers. Continued our march again on same day. Passed Kingston on the 19th. Encamped near Kingston until May 22, when we again moved on. Met the enemy again on the 25th of May near Dallas. During the stay of our army before Dallas my regiment was almost daily more or less engaged with the enemy. Companies F, G, and I, especially, suffered severely on the 27th, a new skirmish line being established on that day, and said companies being out as skirmishers. On 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th of June we guarded, with the rest of our brigade, the hospital of our corps. Joined the army again on the 9th of June.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
Seventeenth Kentucky was deployed as skirmishers to cover the advance of its brigade, and suffered quite severely in the advance late in the afternoon, more than 20 casualties in the skirmish line bearing unmistakable evidence of the sharp fire to which it had been exposed. During the night of the 19th the enemy evacuated his works in the vicinity of Cassville, being the fourth intrenched position abandoned, and retired across the Etowah. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, the 20th, 21st, and 22d of May, the troops rested quietly in camp, but it was a busy period for commanding generals and staff officers preparing for the grand flank movement for turning the enemy's position at the railway gap in the Allatoona Hills. Taking twenty days subsistence in wagons, the entire army defiantly cut loose from its line of communication, crossed the Etowah River, and pushed boldly southward through a most abrupt and difficult range of hills. The movement was commenced on Monday, the 23d. On that a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
up position near Oostenaula River and built breast-works. May 15, enemy again abandoned their works and we took up line of march, followinghim southward. May 16, continued the march. May 17, still following the enemy. May 18, took up position in front of the enemy; during the night of the 18th the [enemy] abandoned his intrenchments. May 19, took up line of march, passing through Kingston; overtook the enemy near Cassville intrenched; took up position, and built breastworks. May 20, 21, 22, remained in our works, the enemy in the mean time retreating southward; while remaining in our works near Cassville replenished our stores of rations, reduced baggage, and prepared to follow the enemy across the Etowah River to his stronghold at Atlanta. May 23, took up line of march southward, crossed the Etowah River. May 24, still going southward in pursuit. May 25, still in pursuit. May 26, deployed regiment as skirmishers; encountered the enemy's skirmishers. Casualties, 1 man wounde
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
Cassville. The advance was made rapidly, severe skirmishing ensued, and the enemy driven from his advanced position before night. In this affair Captai-n Lendrum, of the Seventeenth Kentucky Volunteers, a gallant officer, was killed. Captain Hanna, of the Seventyninth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, was severely wounded; many enlisted men were killed and wounded. The brigade bivouacked in the position taken on the 19th day of May during the 20th, 21st, and 22d days of May, 1864. On the 22d day of May the Nineteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers rejoined the brigade, having been detached since the 4th day of May when near Catoosa SDrings. The brigade marched from the position near Cassville on the 23d day of May. Nothing occurred on the 24th and 25th of May. On the 26th the brigade was placed in support of the First and Second Brigades of this division, who had taken their position near Pumpkin Vine Creek. There was slight skirmishing and some shelling by the enemy during the day, but
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 94 (search)
reat or to destroy it. Reaching the bridge at 4 p. m., I found some of Garrard's cavalry, which had passed me, already there. I formed my lines here so as to cover all approaches and remained until morning, seeing nothing of the enemy. May 20, marched by the Cassville road four miles, passing the Confederate saltpeter works, which I caused to be destroyed by my rear guard, and formed on the right of Baird's division, my left resting on the railroad, my right considerably refused. May 21 and 22, my division lay in bivouac. On the 22d my preparations for the ensuing march were arranged. By stripping my regiment of all baggage, except that which might be carried on the persons of officers or their horses, and sending back the surplus, I was able to provide transportation for the twenty days rations and forage required by the orders of Major-General Sherman. On the 23d I marched, crossing Etowah River at the Island Ford, bivouacked in line and on Euharlee Creek, my left resting immed
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 96 (search)
works at 8 a. m. and passed through General Baird's division, near the creek, and marched on the Rough and Ready road to a point about one mile north of the town and bivouacked for the night. September 8.-The brigade moved at 7 o'clock, taking the advance of the division on the road leading to Atlanta. When within about two miles of the town it took position and went into camp, where it now is. The Second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry was detached from the brigade, near Kingston, May 22, as a guard for the supply train. July 26, Col. A. G. McCook received orders from department headquarters to report with his regiment to the post commander at Chattanooga, its time having nearly expired. August 29, the Tenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Capt. J. W. Roby commanding, was ordered to report to the officer in charge of the ordnance department, Marietta, Ga. Appended is a consolidated report of the casualties the brigade has suffered during the Georgia campaign. Zzz
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