Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for June 11th or search for June 11th in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
Railroad, arrived at the White House just as the enemy's cavalry was about to attack it, and compelled it to retire. The result of this expedition was that General Sheridan met the enemy's cavalry near Trevilian Station on the morning of the 11th of June, whom he attacked and, after an obstinate contest, drove from the field in complete rout. He left his dead and nearly all his wounded in our hands, and about 400 prisoners and several hundred horses. On the 12th he destroyed the railroad froders, seemingly emboldened by Forrest's operations, were also very active in Kentucky. The most noted of these was Morgari. With a force of from 2,000 to 3,000 cavalry he entered the State through Pound Gap in the latter part of May. On the 11th of June he attacked and captured Cynthiana, with its entire garrison. On the 12th he was overtaken by General Burbridge and completely routed with heavy loss, and was finally driven out of the State. This notorious guerrilla was afterward surprised
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
ad to reach it. On approaching close to the enemy, I found him occupying a line full twelve miles long, more than he could hold with his force. General McPherson was ordered to move toward Marietta, his right on the railroad, General Thomas on Kenesaw and Pine Mountain, and General Schofield off toward Lost Mountain; General Garrard's cavalry on the left, and General Stoneman on the right, and General McCook looking to our rear and communications. Our depot was at Big Shanty. By the 11th of June our lines were close up, and we made dispositions to break the line between Kenesaw and Pine Mountains. General Hooker was on its right and front, General Howard on its left and front, and General Palmer between it and the railroad. During a sharp cannonading from General Howard's right, or General Hooker's left, General Polk was killed on the 14th, and on the morning of the 15th Pine Mountain was found abandoned by the enemy. Generals Thomas and Schofield advanced and found him again s
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
essing them back we discovered that Pine Top was occupied by the enemy in force. At this point the command was halted to wait for the appearance of the Fourteenth Corps, which was to have the front in the order of march for the day. When it appeared General Palmer formed his line facing southward toward Pine Top. The two corps formed in conjunction and pushed up to within cannon range of the enemy's line. During the night batteries were put in position and good works were constructed. June 11, General Palmer's corps gained a little ground to his left and front. The interval left was filled by my command. June 12 and 13, heavy rains occurred and no change took place. June 14, my lines were extended about 300 paces, and advanced some three-quarters of a mile on the left toward the east of Pine Top and in conjunction with the Fourteenth Corps. During the last three days much artillery firing occurred. We opened all of our batteries whenever the enemy showed any force. D
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 20 (search)
furlough. On the morning of June 10 General Cruft was ordered to Chattanooga on account of severe sickness, and I had the honor to assume command. Moved out on the Burnt Hickory and Marietta road in advance of the division, deployed the Twenty-first Illinois and Thirty-first Indiana as skirmishers; the line soon became engaged with the enemy's skirmishers; drove them back nearly a half mile. The line was here. halted and column deployed into position and slight barricades constructed. June 11, line was relieved by portions of Colonel (now General) Grose's and General Whitaker's brigades, and my command, by order of General Stanley, moved to the left of General Grose, relieving General Morgan's brigade, of the Fourteenth Army Corps, and formed in two lines, three battalions front. Just before dusk commenced movement to occupy position 400 or 500 yards farther to the front; completed movement under cover of night. During the night my position was strongly intrenched. June 12, l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
vy and concentrated that no human being could show above the works for any length of time without being shot. The enemy was so hotly pressed that on the morning of the 5th his works were again found vacated. June the 6th we pursued them, and took position about three miles south of Acworth. Here we remained until the 10th June, on which day we advanced skirmishingn) and found the enemy strongly intrenched on Pine Mountain, with his left toward Lost and his right toward Kenesaw Mountain. June 11, took position on the left of Hooker and the right of Wood's division, and threw up earth-works with lumber revetments for artillery and riflemen. Keeping a heavy line of skirmishers forward, the enemy opened from Pine Mountain with artillery. Remained in this position, with severe skirmishing, the 12th, 13th, and 14th of June. On the 14th a shell from the Fifth Indiana Battery, commanded by Lieutenant Morrison, fired from a 3-inch Rodman gun, from the section commanded by Lieutenant
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
; we moved over the works and encamped for the night. June 6, marched at 6 a. m. in direction of the railroad, and encamped about three miles from Acworth. June 7, cleaned up camp and arranged tents in proper order. June 8, still in camp; nothing of importance transpired. June 9, remained quiet in camp all day and night. June 10, struck tents at 6 a. m. and marched about three miles in a southerly direction; came up with the enemy and formed line of battle, and encamped for the night. June 11, occupied the same position throughout the day; no fighting of consequence in our front. June 12, still hold the same position as yesterday; nothing but skirmishing through the day. June 13, remained in the same place throughout the day; nothing but the usual picket-firing in our front. June 14, moved one-half mile to the left, and encamped for the night. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front early this morning and were immediately followed, my regiment in advance of the division. Afte
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
the rebels having retreated during the night. On Sunday, June 5, the regiment lay quietly in camp all day. On Monday, June 6, the regiment marched at 5 a. m. a distance of about six miles to near Acworth Station. The regiment lay in camp during the 7th, 8th, and 9th. On Friday, June 10, the regiment left camp at 7 a. m., and marched four miles and encamped near Pine Knob, or Pine Top, near the enemy, our regiment on the second line, and was not engaged with the enemy. On Saturday and Sunday, 11th and 12th of June, the regiment still lay in camp on the second line in the same position as on the 10th. On Monday, June 13, the regiment moved one mile to the left, and threw up new works during the night. The rebels in front evacuated the same night. On Tuesday, June 14, the regiment moved forward one mile; finding the enemy in force, we here threw up new works; casualties, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 15, the regiment continued in the same position as on the 14th. We
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
mirable. June 5, remained in the same position. June 6, marched to Morris' Hill Church, bringing up the rear of the corps, and leaving Kimball's brigade behind to guard and bring up the corps hospitals. June 7, General Kimball having performed this duty, rejoined the division. He had several skirmishes with the enemy's cavalry. June 8 and 9, remained in camp. June 10, marched to a position in front of Pine Mountain, taking position to the right and rear of General Stanley's division. June 11, 12, 13, and 14, skirmishing and changes of position. The enemy retired on the night of the 14th. June 15, the corps was ordered to attack the enemy in his new position, my division to lead. Division was formed in column of attack, preceded by three regiments deployed as skirmishers, under command of Colonel Bradley, Fifty-first Illinois, who conducted the advance with great skill. The enemy's skirmishers were steadily driven out of skirmish pits in strong positions, and forced back to
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
ed and regiment went on picket. June 7, skirmished with rebel cavalry, capturing 8 prisoners. No loss in regiment. June 8, moved at 7 a. m., rejoining the division at 2 p. m. and camping four miles from Acworth. June 9, lay in camp. June 10, marched at 7 a. m., halting frequently and making but little progress, camping 7 p. m., having advanced but three miles. Colonel Marsh having been ordered to Nashville for medical treatment, Lieutenant-Colonel Kerr took command of regiment to-day. June 11, moved at 9 a. m. very slowly, the road being crowded with troops, and at 12 halted near Pine Mountain. Remained at this place until June 14. The roads were very bad by reason of daily heavy rains. June 14, advanced one mile. June 15, from 2 p. m. to 6 p. m., advanced two miles, regiment being formed in close column by division, and bayonets fixed, in momentary expectation of a charge. At 6 p. m., enemy being found strongly posted in our immediate front, the brigade halted and immediate
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
cupying nearly the same position in the trenches. June 5, the One hundred and twenty-fifth having been on picket during the night advanced as skirmishers at daybreak and found that the enemy had evacuated his works. June 6, moved at 6 a. m. eight miles toward the railroad and bivouacked at 4 p. m. near Lost Mountain. June 7, 8, and 9, remained in same place, men washing and resting. June 10, marched at 11 a. m. through mud and rain three miles and confronted the enemy near Pine Mountain. June 11, occupied in getting into positions, rain falling in such quantities as almost to prevent operations. June 12 and 13, active operations are suspended on account of excessive wet weather. June 14. regiment on picket, nothing of importance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two miles, when we again encountered him behind strong works. June 16, heavy artillery firing, but no movement on our part. June 17, advanced our lines a short distance. June 18, the li
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