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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 10: engagement at Bull Run, and battle of Manassas. (search)
Chapter 10: engagement at Bull Run, and battle of Manassas. The Federal Army under the command of General McDowell reached the vicinity of Fairfax Court-House on July 17th, and General Bonham, commanding that advanced post with a brigade of South Carolina troops, fell back and took position behind Bull Run, where, in line along that stream, were located the different regiments, batteries, and brigades of General Beauregard's army. The line extended a distance of eight miles from Union Mills on the right, to the stone bridge over Bull Run on the left, where it is crossed by the Warrenton and Alexandria turnpike. McDowell, arriving at Centreville, threw forward, on the 18th, a division under General Tyler, to feel General Beauregard's line, but not to bring on an engagement. But General Tyler, brought forward a battery of the Washington Artillery and opened fire upon the Confederates. After a sharp fight his forces were withdrawn with loss. This affair, being one almost
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 13: responsibility for the failure to pursue. (search)
ble at the time, from considerations which appeared so weighty as to more than counterbalance its proposed advantages. Informed of these views and of the decision of the War Department, I then made my preparations for the stoutest practicable defence of the line of Bull Run, the enemy having developed his purpose, by the advance on, and occupation of, Fairfax Court-House, from which my advance brigade had been withdrawn. The War Department having been informed by me, by telegraph, on July 17th, of the movement of General McDowell, General Johnston was immediately ordered to form a junction of his army corps with mine, should the movement in his judgment be deemed advisable. General Holmes was also directed to push forward, with two regiments, a battery, and one company of cavalry. The order issued by the War Department to General Johnston was not, as herein reported, to form a junction should the movement in his judgment be deemed advisable. The following is an accurate
nd of colors as trophies of their prowess, but now the time had come when man could do no more. They were physically unable to make a sortie, and all hope of outside relief from Johnston was gone. General Pemberton therefore resolved to seek terms of capitulation, and the city surrendered to General Grant on July 4th. On May 9, 1864, General Pemberton resigned his commission and expressed his willingness to serve in the ranks; the President conferred on him a lieutenant-colonelcy of artillery. General Grant immediately telegraphed to Washington. The enemy surrendered this morning. General Sherman will face immediately on Johnston and drive him from the State. On July 17th, General Johnston abandoned Jackson and retreated into the interior. General Johnston is retreating on the east side of Pearl River, and I can only learn from him of such vague purposes as were unfolded when he held his army before Richmond.-Letter of President Davis to General Lee, July 21, 1863.