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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official report of General R. L. Gibson of the defence and fall of the Spanish Fort. (search)
harged his lines, surprised and drove in his skirmishers, capturing a few prisoners and a large number of arms and accoutrements, and was only recalled after the enemy was revealed in a heavy and extended order of battle. Our object seemed to be accomplished, for it was not until late in the evening that he advanced, feeling his way cautiously, and, making no assault, invested our defences. My scouts had reported two corps d'armee in front of us (the Thirteenth and Sixteenth), Major-General Canby commanding. From information derived from the prisoners, and from drawings and maps captured with one of the engineers of the Sixteenth corps, I estimated the force to be not less than 20,000 muskets strong-perhaps much larger. On his first advance he succeeded at some points in pushing his skirmishers to within two hundred yards; on the center and right he was driven back. Our artillery fire was reserved until his light batteries came well up, when it was suddenly opened, and i
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Farewell address of Brigadier-General R. L. Gibson to the Louisiana brigade after the terms of surrender had been agreed upon between Lieut.-Gen. Richard Taylor, C. S. A., and Major-Gen. E. R. S. Canby, U. S. A. (search)
Farewell address of Brigadier-General R. L. Gibson to the Louisiana brigade after the terms of surrender had been agreed upon between Lieut.-Gen. Richard Taylor, C. S. A., and Major-Gen. E. R. S. Canby, U. S. A. Headquarters Gibson's brigade, near Meridian, Mississippi, May 8th, 1865. fellow-soldiers: For more than four years we have shared together the fortunes of war. Throughout all the scenes of this eventful revolution you have been fully tried, and now retire with the consciousness of having achieved a character for discipline, for valor, and for unselfish patriotism, of which you may be justly proud. There is nothing in your career to look back upon with regret. You have always been in front of the enemy; you have never feasted in soft places at the rear, nor fought your battles at comfortable firesides. Your banners are garlanded with the emblems of every soldierly virtue; more than twenty battle-fields have seen them unfurled; they were never lowered save over